Bread making

Submitted: Sunday, Jun 15, 2008 at 22:41
ThreadID: 58832 Views:3299 Replies:8 FollowUps:10
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Evening all. In preparation for my upcoming trip I thought I'd better practice making bread.

Bought a packet of the premixed bread flour and followed the instructions; or so I thought. It always looks easy on the adverts.

Found that the dough was very sticky and I had a hell of a job getting the dough of my hand. Yes I only used one hand. Added a bit of flour to stiffen the mix a bit.

When I was satisfied with the of the dough I placed it in a bowl and covered as instructed, but it took about an hour to get any rise. Is this normal?

After I was satisfied that the dough had done what it was supposed to do I kneaded it for the prescribed time and the bunged it in the oven.

At the end of the cooking time the bread looked a bit doughy inside so I gave it a further 10 minutes or so. Is it normal for fresh bread to look a bit doughified inside.

Box I grabbed (didn't check whether white, brown or whatever) is Sour Dough and Rye.

Bread tasted fine but a bit heavy. Did I do it right or do I need more practice?
Dunc
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Reply By: autosparky - Sunday, Jun 15, 2008 at 22:56

Sunday, Jun 15, 2008 at 22:56
sounds like to much water and on cold days yeast action diminishes try a warmer spot to get the yeast to rise the dough
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Follow Up By: Member - Duncan W (WA) - Sunday, Jun 15, 2008 at 23:17

Sunday, Jun 15, 2008 at 23:17
Think you could be right
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Reply By: Willem - Sunday, Jun 15, 2008 at 22:57

Sunday, Jun 15, 2008 at 22:57
Lots more practise!!!!....LOL

And try a White bread next time



Cheers
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Follow Up By: Ianw - Sunday, Jun 15, 2008 at 23:12

Sunday, Jun 15, 2008 at 23:12
didnt let it rise the second time!
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Follow Up By: Member - Duncan W (WA) - Sunday, Jun 15, 2008 at 23:17

Sunday, Jun 15, 2008 at 23:17
More like read the lable to make sure I get what I really want.
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Reply By: Bongo (Darwin NT) - Sunday, Jun 15, 2008 at 23:11

Sunday, Jun 15, 2008 at 23:11
After you "bunged" it in the oven did you let it prove the second time before putting coals below and on top of the oven?

When I'm "Down South" I put the dough in a closed car to prove; the warm environment helps.
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Follow Up By: Member - Duncan W (WA) - Sunday, Jun 15, 2008 at 23:25

Sunday, Jun 15, 2008 at 23:25
Bungo was trying at home. The acid test is in a fortnight's time.
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Follow Up By: Member - Duncan W (WA) - Sunday, Jun 15, 2008 at 23:27

Sunday, Jun 15, 2008 at 23:27
Oops sorry Bongo a bungo snuck imto your bongo
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Reply By: autosparky - Sunday, Jun 15, 2008 at 23:28

Sunday, Jun 15, 2008 at 23:28
i now use a patisserie (french) yeast and is so much more reliable in so many ways (temp) wise costs 5.95 for 300 g available from local self baking shops (all about bread)
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Reply By: Member - John L (WA) - Sunday, Jun 15, 2008 at 23:45

Sunday, Jun 15, 2008 at 23:45
Dunc
The easy way is to buy Laucke bread mix and follow the instructions using a breadmaker or by hand.
http://www.laucke.com.au/

Have fun
john
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Follow Up By: Member - Duncan W (WA) - Monday, Jun 16, 2008 at 00:24

Monday, Jun 16, 2008 at 00:24
John that is the brand I was using. Good that it comes in the 600gm sachets. The instructions are pretty good as well.
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Reply By: Member - Dunworkin (WA) - Monday, Jun 16, 2008 at 00:11

Monday, Jun 16, 2008 at 00:11
Hi Duncan, it sounds like you were on the right track,

First, a little less water,
Second, a warmer spot to let it prove
Third, let it prove a second time before "bunging" in the oven.
I use TipTop white bread mix (at home in the breadmakeer, in the bush I use the oven with coals mainly on the top)
I use to make my bread from scratch years ago before breadmixes and machines, Geez those were the days!!!!!!!!!!

Cheers

D


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Follow Up By: Member - Duncan W (WA) - Monday, Jun 16, 2008 at 00:28

Monday, Jun 16, 2008 at 00:28
Hi D, you're back from your wanderings again I see. I think you could be right as today was relatively cool maybe I should of used warmer water and then as you say let it rise and then knead it some more then let it sit for a while and then give it a final degassing knead.
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Follow Up By: Member - Dunworkin (WA) - Monday, Jun 16, 2008 at 00:37

Monday, Jun 16, 2008 at 00:37
Yes we are back, went to Kalbarri and then stayed at Dongara for a few days on the way home. We are headed up to Shark Bay next month and then our next trip will be Birdsville races. We might squeeze Albany in between Shark Bay and Birdsville.

Back to the bread, you only need to knead it twice, the first time then let it rise (about twice the size as it was) knead it again and let it recover for about 15/20 minutes (in a warm spot) and then put it in the oven. Well that's how I do it and have done for years, others may have a different way of doing it.

Cheers

D


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Follow Up By: Member - Duncan W (WA) - Monday, Jun 16, 2008 at 09:59

Monday, Jun 16, 2008 at 09:59
Oh to be retired.
Sounds more and more that it wasn't warm enough. One of the older guys here at work gave me some tips as well which I'll try and adopt.

Thanks
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Reply By: Steve63 - Monday, Jun 16, 2008 at 10:42

Monday, Jun 16, 2008 at 10:42
A lot of packet mixes are for bread machines. The machines use a wetter dough. If you can find a Lauke (?sp) they have two sets of instructions, one for the machine and one for hand mixing.

The rising is a function of temperature. The dough needs to be in a warm spot. You an use the inside of a car during the day or put the bowl near the fire so that the bowl is warm (not hot), then turn bowl every 10 minutes or so. You need to let the dough rise a second time. I do this in the camp oven then put it on coals with most of the coals on the lid. You only use the time as a guide. The loaf should sound hollow when it tapped if it is cooked. Mine usually end up like a bought loaf.

Sour Dough and Rye are heavey breads and can be tricky to get right. Stick to white and multi grain type breads. Proper sour dough can take 24 hours to prepare.

A few ideas:
If you have a freezer you can mix the dough and freeze it. Stick it in a bowl with a lid on the dash in the morning and first rise is usuall done by 4pm. So less clean up.

Focaccia is easy and because it is thinner it is easier to get right. Put some sea salt and sliced olived on top before cooking and it is great.

Steve
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Follow Up By: Member - Duncan W (WA) - Monday, Jun 16, 2008 at 20:05

Monday, Jun 16, 2008 at 20:05
Thanks for the tips Steve. I was using that brand of pre mix.
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Reply By: Member - Crazy Dog (QLD) - Monday, Jun 16, 2008 at 15:43

Monday, Jun 16, 2008 at 15:43
Check this below..

hand made bread rolls ...Image Could Not Be Found

The warm water is the clue and a warm sopt to allow to rise. make sure you "knock it down" get the air out by lightly kneeding and leave for about another hour prior to cooking ...

Grrr!!!
AnswerID: 310339

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