Wildflowers, Photos...What is in Your Backyard

Submitted: Sunday, Nov 28, 2010 at 20:39
ThreadID: 82742 Views:6265 Replies:8 FollowUps:15
This Thread has been Archived
Hi All and trust everyone has had a good weekend.

I have been out twice over the weekend to take lots of pictures for a new blog and follow up for Wildflowers, Photos..that Val has been posting lately. The Conservation Park is only a fifteen minute drive and 14 kilometres from where we live, yet we travel thousands of kilometres to see wildflowers in other remote places. Here is a sneak preview and what do you have in your backyard.

Image Could Not Be Found[/fi][fi]/Members/58567.5/Forum/507Image Could Not Be FoundImage Could Not Be FoundImage Could Not Be FoundImage Could Not Be FoundImage Could Not Be FoundImage Could Not Be FoundImage Could Not Be Found


Val has started something special and it up to all of to show the world what we have so special here in Australia.

Cheers

Stephen
Simpson Desert Colours

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

Back Expand Un-Read 0 Moderator

Reply By: Member - Matt & Julie- Sunday, Nov 28, 2010 at 21:35

Sunday, Nov 28, 2010 at 21:35
Hi Stephen

I am always getting picked on for my photos of different weeds as Matthew
calls them!! I will get around to sharing them with you all as soon as I work
out how to!! Great photos especially from Roxby Downs, we were there
third week of September what a site to behold, the outback was a fantastic site this year, looking forward to our trip next year on the Hay River.
Please keep the photos and info coming it is very much appreciated.
Cheers
Julie
Cheers

Matt & Julie


Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Position  Send Message

AnswerID: 437206

Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Sunday, Nov 28, 2010 at 21:48

Sunday, Nov 28, 2010 at 21:48
Hi Julie
The whole of Australia must be filled with many great sites like this at the moment. When we went out to take pictures on the featured eucalypt that the story will be about, we never expected to see so many wildflowers at this time of the year and all within the distance of just a few kilometres.

Great to see that you were able to witness first had the colours of Roxby Downs, like you know they have to be seen to be believed. Post your pictures, as your "weeds" may be someone's wildflowers.

As for your Hay River trip next year, I believe that this is the best Simpson trip to experience.

Cheers

Stephen
Simpson Desert Colours

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 708638

Reply By: Bazooka - Monday, Nov 29, 2010 at 00:46

Monday, Nov 29, 2010 at 00:46
Brilliant, thanks Stephen. Sometimes you have to search but there is always an interesting flower pretty much everywhere you go. Puts me in mind of some of my pics from a work trip in the gulf years ago. During a later slide show for my parents my knowledge of plants was quickly shown to be negligible. Commenting about one flower pic I proudly announced that this was a grevillea, to which my horticulturalist father replied 'yes but which one'? I didn't know (at the time) that there were many many varieties. Keep them coming.
AnswerID: 437222

Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Monday, Nov 29, 2010 at 08:15

Monday, Nov 29, 2010 at 08:15
Hi Bazooka
Thanks for that. When the final work is finished and up here on the forum and blogs you will see that we were some what side tracked from the main theme and were totally surprised by the main different types that we found, just walking to the waterfall.


Cheers

Stephen
Simpson Desert Colours

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 708664

Reply By: Member - Stuart P (WA) - Monday, Nov 29, 2010 at 01:37

Monday, Nov 29, 2010 at 01:37
the orange pea flower , gastrolobium spinosum . producer of sodium monofluoroacetate (1080)
AnswerID: 437224

Follow Up By: Member - Joe F (WA) - Monday, Nov 29, 2010 at 02:23

Monday, Nov 29, 2010 at 02:23
G'day Stuart ~ Stephen L.Image Could Not Be Found

It is quite amaizing really, the subject of "wild flowers" as to its or their significance, the Pilbara has had many studies carried out in regards to new species of "Flora" and yes they find new varieties that may or may not be benificial to mankind, yet in the truest sense such discoveries tack a back seat position when it comes to mining?Image Could Not Be Found
0
FollowupID: 708658

Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Monday, Nov 29, 2010 at 08:20

Monday, Nov 29, 2010 at 08:20
Hi Stuart and Joe

Firstly Stuart thanks for identifying the little orange flower, we have no idea what it was.

And Joe thanks for those pictures from the Pilbara, you can see how nature works in that small little run off area. The flowers must be unreal up there when they are in full bloom.


Cheers

Stephen
Simpson Desert Colours

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 708667

Follow Up By: Member - John and Val - Monday, Nov 29, 2010 at 14:21

Monday, Nov 29, 2010 at 14:21
Hi Stuart,

Interesting point you make about the natural occurrence of 1080 in plants. Apparently plants that contain 1080 or sodium monofluoroacetate occur only in WA and across the NT and into parts of Qld. None of these plants occurs in the southern states which means that native animals in the southern states don't have natural immunity to 1080 as they do in WA. There is a bit more about it here This immunity to 1080 (or lack of it depending on where you happen to be) has implications for how baiting programs using 1080 are carried out. Hence the warnings to those traveling with pets to be very careful of baits especially in WA and northern parts of Australia.

Stephens orange pea comes from SA and Gastrolobium spinosum only occurs in SW WA so I dont think it could be a plant containing 1080. Have a look at Gastrolobium spinosum here It has big spiny leaves unlike Stephens plant.

Unfortunately there are tens if not hundreds of orange pea flowers and a lot of them are difficult to tell apart. It could possibly be a Pultanea or Dillwynia?

Cheers,

Val.
J and V
"Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted."
- Albert Einstein

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 708704

Follow Up By: Member - Stuart P (WA) - Monday, Nov 29, 2010 at 21:37

Monday, Nov 29, 2010 at 21:37
my apologies i must wear my glasses and study the leaves more closely, the flower looks identical to the poisonous pea i grow here on my property
0
FollowupID: 708777

Follow Up By: Member - John and Val - Monday, Nov 29, 2010 at 21:43

Monday, Nov 29, 2010 at 21:43
Hi Stuart, No need for apologies, they can be very hard to tell one from another, and there are lots of different ones that all look quite similar.

Cheers,

Val
J and V
"Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted."
- Albert Einstein

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 708783

Reply By: Member - Heather G (NSW) - Monday, Nov 29, 2010 at 07:42

Monday, Nov 29, 2010 at 07:42
Hi Stephen,

I make a point of photographing many of the wildflowers we find while we are walking along the bush tracks between our home and the nearest newsagency and here are a few of those.

They arent all flowering at the same time.

Image Could Not Be Found

Image Could Not Be Found

Image Could Not Be Found

Image Could Not Be Found

Image Could Not Be Found

Image Could Not Be Found

Image Could Not Be Found

Image Could Not Be Found

Its amazing just how many there are if you take the time to really look out for them.

regards,

Heather
Of all the paths you take in life, make sure a few of them are dirt. John Muir

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

AnswerID: 437227

Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Monday, Nov 29, 2010 at 08:26

Monday, Nov 29, 2010 at 08:26
Hi Heather
Thanks for sharing those great photos and that was the point that I was making.
If we all take the time to have a look at where we all live, Australia is full of so many beautiful wildflowers what in most cases we take for granted.

Those orchids are great and we took a couple of pictures of little orchids that grow in the Conservation Park.


Cheers

Stephen
Simpson Desert Colours

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 708668

Reply By: Richard W (NSW) - Monday, Nov 29, 2010 at 11:46

Monday, Nov 29, 2010 at 11:46
Some beaut images in this thread.

Whilst the first orchid I don't think is a native the second one is and they are both on the Melaleuca tree literally in my backyard.



Dendrobium Speciosum sometimes called Rock Lily:


A few more from around Lake Parramatta:





Possibly Heath Banksia - Bansia ericifolia


Possibly Pink Phebalium - Phebalium nottii


Pea family most likely Daviesia or Dillwynia genus:



AnswerID: 437253

Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Monday, Nov 29, 2010 at 14:23

Monday, Nov 29, 2010 at 14:23
Hi Richard
Great pictures and it shows just how diversified the flora is across our great nation.

The great thing about Australia, like our fauna we have many types of plant that are only found here in Australia, and some species restricted to very small areas.

Thanks for putting up your photos and I believe Val will start a new Blog and have all these Wildflowers, Photos... forum posts linked so viewers will not have to search through countless posts.


Cheers

Stephen
Simpson Desert Colours

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 708705

Follow Up By: Richard W (NSW) - Monday, Nov 29, 2010 at 16:48

Monday, Nov 29, 2010 at 16:48
Thanks Stephen.
I carry an Australian Wildflower and Bird field guide with me in my travels.
They are quite useful when trying to identify something when out and about.
0
FollowupID: 708714

Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Monday, Nov 29, 2010 at 18:56

Monday, Nov 29, 2010 at 18:56
Hi Richard
When I post the full story, I will have to get you to try and identify all the different types of flowers, there were lots.

Cheers

Stephen
Simpson Desert Colours

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 708735

Reply By: lifetime member - Ou - Monday, Nov 29, 2010 at 13:58

Monday, Nov 29, 2010 at 13:58
very nice.
bob
AnswerID: 437272

Reply By: Member - Malcolm (Townsville) - Monday, Nov 29, 2010 at 19:20

Monday, Nov 29, 2010 at 19:20
I often get criticised for stopping to take - yet another photo - no excuses !!

Here is a few from our current trip ....

Image Could Not Be Found

Image Could Not Be Found

Image Could Not Be Found

only a couple of weeks left on the road then I can photograph some REAL WEEDS at home. LOL

Mal

(currently Toowoomba QLD)

living the 'good life'

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

AnswerID: 437301

Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Monday, Nov 29, 2010 at 20:39

Monday, Nov 29, 2010 at 20:39
Hi Mal
Thanks for the pictures. You can get some great pictures as you travel this great country of ours.

Cheers

Stephen
Simpson Desert Colours

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 708760

Reply By: Member - John and Val - Monday, Nov 29, 2010 at 21:20

Monday, Nov 29, 2010 at 21:20
Hi Stephen,

Here are a few taken in and around Canberra over the last 2 or 3 years.

Bulbine lily on top of Mt Coree
Image Could Not Be Found

Blue Veronica - Parahebe also on top of Mt Coree
Image Could Not Be Found

Daisy, probably an Olearia near Bredbo
Image Could Not Be Found

Ground Orchid - Caladenia near Bredbo
Image Could Not Be Found

Snow Gum, Eucalyptus pauciflora in the Brindabellas
Image Could Not Be Found

Daisy, possibly Podolepis in Brindabella Mtns
Image Could Not Be Found

Purple flag - Patersonia, a native iris, near Braidwood
Image Could Not Be Found

There are many beautiful natives, its a real thrill to come across them and to get a decent photo!

Cheers,

Val
J and V
"Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted."
- Albert Einstein

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

AnswerID: 437331

Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Monday, Nov 29, 2010 at 21:32

Monday, Nov 29, 2010 at 21:32
Hi Val
More great photos to add to your Blog. Re your question the other day, you have my full permission to use or link my blog to what ever way you do go.

You have started something now and lets hope that the other members keep it going.

My full post and Blog should be up by the end of the week.

Cheers

Stephen
Simpson Desert Colours

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 708776

Follow Up By: Member - John and Val - Monday, Nov 29, 2010 at 21:56

Monday, Nov 29, 2010 at 21:56
Hi Stephen,

Thank you very much for that. Hopefully I will get a blog up in the next day or 2. Its been raining all day here today so I have spent the enforced indoors time going through photos and generally getting organised.

I am working on another wildflower, photos ... post that I will probably have ready by the weekend, plus I have several more mulling around in my head. I want to incorporate at least common names (and Latin names where possible without getting too technical), as there do seem to be quite a few people who like to be able to put names on things (and I'm one of them). But even without a name some info about where the plant was growing will also be useful. So it all takes a bit of time, but its fun to do.

Looking forward to your post.

Cheers,

Val.
J and V
"Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted."
- Albert Einstein

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 708788

Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Monday, Nov 29, 2010 at 22:23

Monday, Nov 29, 2010 at 22:23
Hi Val
The bonus of the details that I found were the wildflowers. I may have to rely on your past studies to identify the ones that I list. The best part of the find is that they are all flowing at the same time. We had to virtually look at the ground all the time we were walking, as most were hidden in the very lush native grasses that were also in full growth. The biggest flower would have been the size of a 20 cent piece, while most were small and the size of a 5 cent piece or smaller.
Here are a few more and the last one is very interesting. It was only when I viewed them at home that you can see a yellow bug on the flower (the flower was only the size of a 5 cent piece)

Cheers

Stephen

Image Could Not Be FoundImage Could Not Be FoundImage Could Not Be FoundImage Could Not Be Found
Simpson Desert Colours

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 708800

Sponsored Links

Popular Products (13)