Wild Flowers -- Lobed Spinifex triodia basedowii

Submitted: Tuesday, Dec 14, 2010 at 18:28
ThreadID: 83065 Views:8787 Replies:5 FollowUps:0
This Thread has been Archived
Image Could Not Be Found

To me of all the wonderful Plants Shrubs & Trees of The Great Victoria Desert the Lobed Spinifex /ringed spinifex is the most Iconic.
Image Could Not Be Found

lobed spinifex Aboriginal name: Awilura is a slow growing tussock forming perennial grass with needle sharp cylindrical leaves.the clumps are up to 1.5 m tall including flower heads & up to 4m across.

Image Could Not Be Found
lobed spinifex often forms in rings and crescents when older parts die off.
The leaves are up to 25 cm long & 1-5 mm wide.
Image Could Not Be Found

Normally grows on sand dunes swales & sand plains.

Image Could Not Be Found

Sorry! I just had to include a spinifex ant's nest.

Mike.
Back Expand Un-Read 0 Moderator

Reply By: Fred G NSW - Tuesday, Dec 14, 2010 at 18:34

Tuesday, Dec 14, 2010 at 18:34
Good stuff Mike.
AnswerID: 438897

Reply By: Member - joc45 (WA) - Tuesday, Dec 14, 2010 at 20:00

Tuesday, Dec 14, 2010 at 20:00
Intriguing!
A bit like the
Wreath Leschenaultia in WA
Gerry


AnswerID: 438909

Reply By: Member - John and Val - Tuesday, Dec 14, 2010 at 20:43

Tuesday, Dec 14, 2010 at 20:43
Those a wonderful spinifex rings Mike, thanks for putting them up. Beautiful photos too. Does that species produce spinifex resin?

There is so much variety among spinifex. Here are a few of my spinifex shots, though of different species - not sure which ones, maybe someone can identify them?


These are some huge rings from the Victorian mallee - you could see where animals had sought shelter in the centre.Image Could Not Be Found


These soft looking hummocks from the northern half of the Canning are covered with needle sharp points. Not sure whether these are a ring forming species or not - maybe they are just young plants that are not mature enough to have formed a ring.Image Could Not Be Found


At, I think, Well 29 on CSR I spotted this, which I took to be spinifex as it was very prickly, but bright green and with short leaves. No flowers. Can anybody identify it?Image Could Not Be Found

Cheers,

Val
J and V
"Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted."
- Albert Einstein

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

AnswerID: 438912

Reply By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Tuesday, Dec 14, 2010 at 20:53

Tuesday, Dec 14, 2010 at 20:53
Hi Michael
Great pictures and it is part of the outback experience. Here are a few more pictures taken from various locations around Australia, from Victoria through to the true remote desert locations.

Cheers

Stephen

Image Could Not Be FoundImage Could Not Be FoundImage Could Not Be FoundImage Could Not Be FoundImage Could Not Be FoundImage Could Not Be FoundImage Could Not Be FoundImage Could Not Be FoundImage Could Not Be Found
Simpson Desert Colours

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

AnswerID: 438915

Reply By: Member - Duncan W (WA) - Tuesday, Dec 14, 2010 at 21:04

Tuesday, Dec 14, 2010 at 21:04
We encountered one between Millar Range & Saunders Range (GVD) 2years ago that would of measured about 20m across and had another ring growing inside it. There were about 22 of us and we all stood side by side in the ring and we only covered about 1/2 of the circumference. Never seen one that big before or since. Must of been dodging fires for decades.

Image Could Not Be Found
Dunc
Make sure you give back more than you take

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

AnswerID: 438917

Sponsored Links

Popular Products (13)