Wildflowers, Photos.....Acacia peuce

Image Could Not Be Found


Firstly, where ever you are and read this forum post, Happy Australia Day and enjoy this special day that symbolized back in 1788 the start of our Great Nation… Australia.

Nearly all readers of this forum have one very special bond, a love and respect of the Great Outdoors and more often than not, are drawn back again and again to our world famous Aussie Outback. If you are like me, that red sand under your feet, seeing the shimmer on a gibber-covered landscape, laying back in the swag and gazing at night skies like you have never seen before are more than just that; this is the true symbol of what the Outback is like.

One very such true icon of our Australian Outback is a special tree that to the casual observer is just another she oak as the wind blows through its leaves.

In anyone’s terms, 500 years is a very long time to live and if any tree lived that long it must be a giant. Not so in the case of Acacia peuce, or one of the common names as it is known, the Waddy Wood. This is a tree you can call the a real Aussie battler, as it lives year in and out with summer temperatures far in excess of 40° C, winter temperatures quite often below zero, and survive on as little as 150mm of rainfall per year.

If you would like to read the full story on this great tree, you can read it here on my latest Blog…The Waddy Wood

Image Could Not Be Found


For me this tree deserves an Australia Day Award.

Show your support for this tree and please share images that you have taken and show the world what can be seen nowhere else, but on the margins of another true draw card, the Simpson Desert.


Image Could Not Be Found



Image Could Not Be Found


Happy Australia Day



Stephen
Simpson Desert Colours

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

Back Expand Un-Read 0 Moderator

Reply By: Member - John and Val - Thursday, Jan 26, 2012 at 07:51

Thursday, Jan 26, 2012 at 07:51
Hi Stephen,

A great post for Australia Day, and well said too. Acacias, especially those that grow out in the desert have lots of what we like to see as the Aussie qualities - tough, resilient, a bit prickly sometimes, even beautiful in unexpected ways... Waddy Wood has that in spades.

Image Could Not Be Found

Image Could Not Be Found

Image Could Not Be Found

Image Could Not Be Found


And because it IS Australia Day here is our National Floral Emblem, Golden Wattle or Acacia pycnantha showing off our national colours. This wattle can be found along the coast and a bit inland in most states. Its softer, definitely beautiful but not nearly as tough as the desert acacias.

Image Could Not Be Found

May we all give a thought today to appreciate our good fortune to live in such a wonderful country.

Cheers,

Val.
J and V
"Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted."
- Albert Einstein

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

AnswerID: 476033

Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Thursday, Jan 26, 2012 at 07:59

Thursday, Jan 26, 2012 at 07:59
Hi Val

Thanks for adding more great images of Acacia peuce, and yes that great image of our National Floral Emblem, the Golden Wattle.

Happy Australia Day Val and John



Cheers



Stephen
Simpson Desert Colours

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 751051

Reply By: Member - Graham N (SA) - Thursday, Jan 26, 2012 at 08:21

Thursday, Jan 26, 2012 at 08:21
Hi Stephen, John and Val,
Happy Australia day to you.
A special Australia day award to you people for your contributions on this forum I and many others have enjoyed reading your posts.
Looks like one of the years projects will be for us to identify a Waddy Wood tree probably have driven past them and just thought they were she oaks. I think you mentioned once before that there were some near the Birdsville track Stephen.

Happy Australia day and how lucky are we.

Cheers

Graham
The wind will not always blow your way, adjust your sails.
VKS737 1219

Member
My Profile  Send Message

AnswerID: 476036

Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Thursday, Jan 26, 2012 at 08:44

Thursday, Jan 26, 2012 at 08:44
Hi Graham

Firstly Happy Australia Day to you and your family.

Thanks for those kind words, greatly appreciated. I enjoy doing the research and it gives me a far greater appreciation of our unique Australian Flora.

My idea of these type of forum posts and blogs is to give other readers and travellers a greater insight to these special Australian plants, and if they are lucky enough to see them, it will give them a better idea of what that plant is and how it survives.

Yes indeed it is a very special tree and if you are passing a mature tree, stop and look around and admire the scenery, as you will seeing the environment the way that that tree has seen it for hundreds of years, and hopefully many more hundreds of years to come.

The species on the Birdsville Track is another little Aussie battler, Acacia pichardii or the Mount Gason Wattle which you drive by and for most people is just another small twisted tree.


Have a Great Day.



Cheers



Stephen
Simpson Desert Colours

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 751054

Follow Up By: Member - John and Val - Friday, Jan 27, 2012 at 16:09

Friday, Jan 27, 2012 at 16:09
Hi Graham,

Thanks for your kind thoughts, and it is good to know that others enjoy our ramblings. As Stephen has said, its amazing how much there is to learn (and how enjoyable it is) when doing research for a blog or forum post.

I think this thread has demonstrated very well how valuable this forum can be when people contribute in a constructive way, with photos, comments and questions.

I hope you are able to achieve your project and find a Waddy Wood this year!

Cheers,

Val.
J and V
"Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted."
- Albert Einstein

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 751145

Reply By: Michael ( Moss Vale NSW) - Thursday, Jan 26, 2012 at 09:06

Thursday, Jan 26, 2012 at 09:06
Hi Stephen, There is something special about this country. I'v been to about 30 countries, all beautiful in their own way but we definately have the best country and our own continent of course!! Michael
Patrol 4.2TDi 2003

Retired 2016 and now Out and About!

There's time to rest when you're dead,
Get out and do something instead!

Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

AnswerID: 476039

Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Thursday, Jan 26, 2012 at 09:12

Thursday, Jan 26, 2012 at 09:12
Hi Michael

Happy Australia Day, and I am also bias as well, yes we do live and have the Best Country in the World, something that so many Australians take for granted.


Have a Great Day



Cheers



Stephen
Simpson Desert Colours

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 751056

Reply By: Life Member - Phil B (WA) - Thursday, Jan 26, 2012 at 10:31

Thursday, Jan 26, 2012 at 10:31
Hi Stephen

Interesting tree this Acacia peuce very desert oak like even in its juvenile form.

Happy Australia Day to you and Fiona.

cheers
There is a lot of difference between
‘Human Being’ and ‘Being Human’.





Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

AnswerID: 476045

Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Thursday, Jan 26, 2012 at 18:47

Thursday, Jan 26, 2012 at 18:47
Hi Phil

Yes they are but the Desert Oak is a bigger tree. I hope that you have had a great day. We have just returned home from a day over at the beach.


All the best.



Cheers


Stephen
Simpson Desert Colours

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 751089

Follow Up By: Member - John and Val - Saturday, Jan 28, 2012 at 13:23

Saturday, Jan 28, 2012 at 13:23
Hi Phil,

Good point about the similarities with the Desert Oak (Casuarina).

My take on that is that there must be some benefit to survival in both the juvenile and adult forms. The drooping adult form might help to reduce heating and thus conserve water by keeping the foliage more or less parallel to the sun.

Maybe the prickly juvenile foliage protects the very slow growing young plants from excessive browsing (from megafauna?). Just a thought.

Cheers,

Val
J and V
"Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted."
- Albert Einstein

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 751200

Reply By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Thursday, Jan 26, 2012 at 11:24

Thursday, Jan 26, 2012 at 11:24
Hi Stephen, and I hope you also have a great Australia Day. Raining heavy here and our Buderim parade and functions have been cancelled. But I'll still fly the flag and risk being branded racist!

I'm afraid that my understanding of botany is no better than my competence of fishing. However I do appreciate your threads of Australian flora and if I keep reading them I may gain a better appreciation. Many thanks to you.

I'll keep an eye out for the Acacia peuce. (My auto spellchecker keeps trying to change that to "peace" and maybe that is appropriate for the Aussie Outback)

Cheers
Allan

Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

AnswerID: 476047

Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Thursday, Jan 26, 2012 at 18:51

Thursday, Jan 26, 2012 at 18:51
Hi Allan

Thanks for that. It has been a warm day here today and we spent the day over at Moonta and Port Hughes. It was 37 over at the beach and the conditions were perfect, but it lacked the crowd's of city beaches.


Keep Dry and Happy Australia Day.



Cheers



Stephen
Simpson Desert Colours

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 751091

Reply By: Member - Michael John T (VIC) - Thursday, Jan 26, 2012 at 14:42

Thursday, Jan 26, 2012 at 14:42
Hi Stephen,

Great topic, thanks for the post. Quite a few years ago we visited the Mac Clarke CP to view these trees and then in 2010 we came across a strand near Boulia and in fact camped under these magnificent acacias. I have several photos so will compose a short blog about them.

Regards

Mike.
We retired to travell
It's time to go again...

Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

AnswerID: 476058

Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Thursday, Jan 26, 2012 at 18:56

Thursday, Jan 26, 2012 at 18:56
Hi Mike

Great trees for sure. You have some good images in your Blog.


Cheers



Stephen
Simpson Desert Colours

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 751092

Reply By: Member - Duncan W (WA) - Friday, Jan 27, 2012 at 10:54

Friday, Jan 27, 2012 at 10:54
Hi Stephen, based on th ephotos posted so far I think these two photos may also be the Acacia peuce. Photos were taken in the Dr Hicks Range GVD.

Image Could Not Be Found

Image Could Not Be Found
Dunc
Make sure you give back more than you take

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

AnswerID: 476101

Follow Up By: Member - John and Val - Friday, Jan 27, 2012 at 14:05

Friday, Jan 27, 2012 at 14:05
Hi Duncan,

Good photos, and thanks for posting them.

Unfortunately though I doubt that either is of Acacia peuce (and if they were it would be a new location for that species).

I think you may have 2 different trees/shrubs here. The top one has drooping branches, but without more detail cant be sure what it is.

The plant in the second, close-up photo (assuming the photo is right way up) has upright pointing leaves and branches, so is almost certainly different to the first photo. By the look of the seed capsules it is most likely to be a Hakea.

Acacia peuce has very big seed pods holding multiple large seeds.

Cheers,

Val.
J and V
"Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted."
- Albert Einstein

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 751137

Follow Up By: The Explorer - Friday, Jan 27, 2012 at 14:39

Friday, Jan 27, 2012 at 14:39
Hi some additional info here including a distribution map...

Acacia peuce Waddy, Waddi, Waddy-wood, Birdsville Wattle

Cheers
Greg
I sent one final shout after him to stick to the track, to which he replied “All right,” That was the last ever seen of Gibson - E Giles 23 April 1874

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message
Moderator

0
FollowupID: 751138

Follow Up By: Member - Duncan W (WA) - Friday, Jan 27, 2012 at 15:36

Friday, Jan 27, 2012 at 15:36
Hi Val, thought I might have been off the mark. Unfortunatly with not having the ability to have a close up look of the previous photos I wasn't sure if mine were or were not.

Now you mention that the seed pods are Hakea, I think I'd been told that before but forgot. Thanks for reminding me.



Dunc
Make sure you give back more than you take

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 751142

Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Saturday, Jan 28, 2012 at 08:29

Saturday, Jan 28, 2012 at 08:29
Hi Dunc, Greg and Val


Sorry for the delay, but have been off line for the past 24 hours due to a family funeral, sorry.

Val and Greg have shown you correctly and thanks for that.


All the Best and thanks for taking the time for displaying those great images, from great country.


Cheers


Stephen
Simpson Desert Colours

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 751180

Reply By: Member - Min (NSW) - Saturday, Jan 28, 2012 at 11:53

Saturday, Jan 28, 2012 at 11:53
Hi Stephen,

I've been off the air for some time due to travel, etc. and have only sporadically looked at the site since our return in November so am working my way through a couple of weeks of posts. What a delight to come across your post on Acacia peuce (Waddy Wood) after reading the unpleasant exchanges regarding getting water.

We got amongst the Waddy trees down the Bedourie road from Birdsville when we were on that trip you talked us into in July! I was in heaven and took lots of photos and even came across what I believe to be a lone Acacia pickardii which should only be at Mt Gason on the Birdsville Track south of Clifton Downs and Andado Station, NT.

It's good to be back.

Cheers,

Min

John 'n' Min

Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

AnswerID: 476190

Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Saturday, Jan 28, 2012 at 20:32

Saturday, Jan 28, 2012 at 20:32
Hi Min

Good to hear you are "back on air" as such. I was only asking about you with another EO member that you know recently, asking that I had not heard of you for a while and hoped things were OK.

As for the Acacia pichardii, you never know, as if you have read my Blog about that species, it is still not clear as to where the official populations can be found because of the remote nature of where they have been and are being found.

Glad to hear you enjoyed the Acacia peuce north of Birdsville.


Welcome Back.



Cheers



Stephen

Simpson Desert Colours

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 751242

Sponsored Links

Popular Products (13)