Spider orchids 2012

Submitted: Sunday, Oct 21, 2012 at 15:44
ThreadID: 98659 Views:3531 Replies:6 FollowUps:9
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A few orchids from this year.Some of these are threatened species that some may not have seen before.
cheers Graeme.
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Reply By: Member - John and Val - Sunday, Oct 21, 2012 at 16:58

Sunday, Oct 21, 2012 at 16:58
Hi Graeme,

Thanks for posting these lovely photos. I particularly like the cherry spider orchid - beautiful. May I link this to the wildflowers blog page - its been very quiet for a few months but that will soon change. I am hoping to get an orchids blog up before too long but its a big job just sorting the photos!

I wonder if you - or anyone else - can identify this orchid for me, found this year right on the coast east of Albany?

We found quite a few orchids this year, and were amazed at how many enamel orchids we saw this time.

Cheers,

Val
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Follow Up By: dellycat - Sunday, Oct 21, 2012 at 21:38

Sunday, Oct 21, 2012 at 21:38
I think that is a Dragon Orchid, we saw some a few weeks back in the Narrogin area.

Cheers
Sally
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Follow Up By: Member - graeme W (WA) - Monday, Oct 22, 2012 at 02:31

Monday, Oct 22, 2012 at 02:31
Hi Val. Dragon orchid another family of orchids different to spider orchids which are caladenia of which there are around 120 in wa.
cheers Graeme.
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Follow Up By: Member - John and Val - Monday, Oct 22, 2012 at 08:55

Monday, Oct 22, 2012 at 08:55
Thank you Graeme and Sally. Dragon orchid it is, and a fascinating story as well when I googled it.

Cheers,

Val.
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Reply By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Sunday, Oct 21, 2012 at 20:48

Sunday, Oct 21, 2012 at 20:48
Hi Graeme

Thanks for sharing those great images, it would have been a great experience to see them.

To give them a better impact next time, make the image size bigger, in that way the photos will be bigger when they are opened, and not small as they are. You can see from Val's image just how much bigger it is when opened.




Cheers


Stephen
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Follow Up By: Member - graeme W (WA) - Monday, Oct 22, 2012 at 02:44

Monday, Oct 22, 2012 at 02:44
Hi Stephen.Takes that long to load them if any bigger so used the smallest size i could.Have a canon 100mm is macro on its way at the moment so will have know excuses now if i cant get a near perfect shot.Been a bit dry so spider orchid numbers are down a bit with one ive been chasing for some time not flowering this year,only small numbers of this species on a good year so have to wait another year now.Some patches of bush are covered with different sun orchids at the moment .Never seen this many before.May post some next week if allowed another post.
cheers Graeme.
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Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Monday, Oct 22, 2012 at 07:40

Monday, Oct 22, 2012 at 07:40
Hi Graeme

Sorry to hear about the slow upload, but never the less keep up those great images, they are great.

Looking forward to your next lot.

Cheers


Stephen
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Reply By: dellycat - Sunday, Oct 21, 2012 at 22:03

Sunday, Oct 21, 2012 at 22:03
Thank you for sharing your photos. I love the native orchids and look for them where ever we go and now have a few more to add to the find list :D
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Reply By: Member - Stuart P (WA) - Monday, Oct 22, 2012 at 00:51

Monday, Oct 22, 2012 at 00:51
nice photos what lense and exif data
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Follow Up By: Member - graeme W (WA) - Monday, Oct 22, 2012 at 02:58

Monday, Oct 22, 2012 at 02:58
Hi Stuart.No special lense but will have the 100mm is macro by next week i hope.Use a canon 600D which is a very good camera with full hd vidio etc with a tameron 18-270 lense which is a great allrounder that is also good value.Used with the cameras macro setting orchid photos are reasonable with this setup.By all accounts the macro lense i have coming is meant to be the best setup for orchids etc but it is very expensive even on line.Its also meant to be a good portrait lense as well .Hope the quality improves.
cheers Graeme.
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Follow Up By: Member - Stuart P (WA) - Monday, Oct 22, 2012 at 12:08

Monday, Oct 22, 2012 at 12:08
thanks for that Graeme , being fairly new to photography I was interested in which lenses were being used in travel
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Reply By: Member - Barry H (WA) - Tuesday, Oct 23, 2012 at 22:26

Tuesday, Oct 23, 2012 at 22:26
Hi Graeme,

Here are a few of ours from the last couple of weeks.

We have been lucky to find a few unusual one's this season.

I believe the Augusta Bee Orchid is uncommon

The King in his Carriage is just plain hard to see








Regards

Barry H
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Follow Up By: Member - graeme W (WA) - Tuesday, Oct 23, 2012 at 23:14

Tuesday, Oct 23, 2012 at 23:14
Hi Barry. The augusta bee is uncommon. Exelsia is probibly the most impressive of the white spider orchids and this was a good year for the. The funnel web crosses with others in particular the forrest mantis. Where you find the king in his carrage you are also likely to find the flying duck and other hammer orchids but being so small are hard to find. Your queen of sheeba has unusal colour could you pm me where you found it as we part of a program putting a data base together for rare orchids.
Cheers Graeme.
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Reply By: Member - Barry H (WA) - Thursday, Oct 25, 2012 at 21:47

Thursday, Oct 25, 2012 at 21:47
Hi Graeme,

Sorry I cant help you with the location of the Queen of Sheba location, it was on private property and we agreed to keep it private, enough to say it was in the Eneabba area.

The reason the colour is a little unusual is because it is an Eastern Queen of Sheba.

Attatched is an Elbow Orchid that we found today, these guys are smaller than King in his Carriage and Duck Orchids.





Regards

Barry H
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Follow Up By: Member - graeme W (WA) - Sunday, Oct 28, 2012 at 23:30

Sunday, Oct 28, 2012 at 23:30
Hi Barry. No probs. Its not that subspecies under threat but the one found in the southwest. Used to be found in quite a number of locations but sadly missing from nearly all now and i guess with buget cuts etc dec have developed programs to help find any populations left. Not allowed to post any more photos of orchids on the forum. Pity really as have found a lot of special ones this year. Not going to bother with a blog as orchids are flowering every month and my guess is most would read it once but to keep up to date i would have to add to it all the time and most would not reada second time.
Nice shot of the elbow orchid.
Cheers Graeme.
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