trailblazer 60 l fridge

Submitted: Sunday, Jan 25, 2004 at 20:23
ThreadID: 10008 Views:12587 Replies:6 FollowUps:7
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looking to purchase a trailblazer 60L fridge that is about 9 years old. the price is reasonable and the fellow selling used it very little as he never had the 240 volt adapter. this fridge uses the old R12 refridgerant as it has the old danfoss BD 2 compressor. the fridge looks in excellent condition. anyone have any figures on how long it will take to get to zero empty, out of the sun, on a day of lets say 28C. perhaps there is a way of checking performance without being a technician. any ideas, good or bad or feedback will be appreciated. cheers, robert
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Reply By: Member - Eskimo - Sunday, Jan 25, 2004 at 21:07

Sunday, Jan 25, 2004 at 21:07
old r12?
will require an oil change( which aint easy) if & when a leak develops.

not a lot of difference between r12 and r143
trailblazer are good ....i am a fridgie and built my own Wow! am I cute
If yer ain't fishing, Yer ain't livin
Richard
AnswerID: 44301

Follow Up By: robert4615 - Sunday, Jan 25, 2004 at 21:19

Sunday, Jan 25, 2004 at 21:19
richard, what exactly is an oil change? i understand that these compressors are hermetically sealed. when you say a leak develops--could'nt any new fridge have the same problem? since you have built your own is there anything to look for in purchasing a used fridge? could and empty fridge get below zero in one hour? thanks, robert
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Follow Up By: Member - Eskimo - Sunday, Jan 25, 2004 at 21:29

Sunday, Jan 25, 2004 at 21:29
r12 uses mineral oil
r134 uses synthetic oil
the compressor is only "hemeticaly sealed" to the rest of the system
Oil and refrigerant are always being circulated.

empty fridge is v ersus time is not how one should work it out!
empty fridge's actually use more energy due to the cylcle rate.
mine gets to below 0 in less than 1 hour

Trailblazer have a very good insulation factor compared to most..
one reason why i copied.

yes a leak can develop with any new fridge ...mine did after 3 yrs ...but that problem shouldnt happen again....(keeping my fingers crossed as they always breakdown when you need them most)Wow, am I cute! The extra long legs are built-in prevention against ducks disease. Great looks and a real goer. Doesnt waddle along like some.
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Follow Up By: Dennis (Brisbane) - Monday, Jan 26, 2004 at 10:37

Monday, Jan 26, 2004 at 10:37
Eskimo, so when are you going into business building fridges?

Could be a real money spinner for you, could probably even sell enough to make it worthwhile just from the people that visit this forum.

The more competition in the market place the better.
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FollowupID: 306559

Follow Up By: Member - Eskimo - Monday, Jan 26, 2004 at 12:18

Monday, Jan 26, 2004 at 12:18
Running a business now in airconditioning.
Dont want to get into manufacturing....cant do 10% of want i want to do now...only worse if i try to make fridges too...

However ....always thought about making one that moulds into the car ...say over the wheel arch and into the corner etc etc....might happen one dayWow, am I cute! The extra long legs are built-in prevention against ducks disease. Great looks and a real goer. Doesnt waddle along like some.
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FollowupID: 306566

Follow Up By: Dennis (Brisbane) - Monday, Jan 26, 2004 at 12:45

Monday, Jan 26, 2004 at 12:45
Smallish freezer on top of the wheel arch, larger fridge behind.

That would be a real space saver in a styleside dual cab.
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FollowupID: 306569

Follow Up By: Member - Eskimo - Monday, Jan 26, 2004 at 13:58

Monday, Jan 26, 2004 at 13:58
Dennis....i'm not accepting orders lol lolWow, am I cute! The extra long legs are built-in prevention against ducks disease. Great looks and a real goer. Doesnt waddle along like some.
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Reply By: ianmc - Monday, Jan 26, 2004 at 00:00

Monday, Jan 26, 2004 at 00:00
Hi Robert. I owned a Trailblazer 60l for a few years and did a number of trips in the tropics where it kept its cool beautifully.
Doubt if many others are as efficient, but it is bulky & as I often travel solo & nowadays find it too heavy to lift in & out I switched to a Waco 45 when they first came out & were quite cheap.
It may be best to get the genuine factory 240V adaptor even if it is dearer than others. It will NOT freeze in standard trim but the factory has a different thermostat which they sent me free of charge so I could use it as a freezer but never installed it.
It was heavily use by 3 people in the tropics & everything cooled quickly after re-loading it.
It was used in unshaded area of truck in 35-39c & was fine.
AnswerID: 44319

Reply By: Topcat (WA) - Monday, Jan 26, 2004 at 00:14

Monday, Jan 26, 2004 at 00:14
Hi Robert, I run a 60ltr. Trailblazer which is 15 years old & have never had a problem with it as I have mentioned in previous forum discussions. Mine does have the 240 volt adaptor but I have run it in the 12volt situation from the ambient temperature condition to full freeze (i.e. thermostat at max cooling position) & managed to freeze an ice-cream container of water in 6 hours which I thought is pretty good. Provided you have the battery storage capacity & recharge capabilties they are a very good portable refrigerator. Once the internal temperature has reached its cut out setting, mine in the fridge/freeze condition (setting 4. on thermostat) draws about 20amps of battery power over a 24hr. period. I have a wooden partition to separate the frozen food on the bottom from the items I just want to cool on the top. I have a Solar Panel recharge set-up to my deep cycle batteries which keep my batteries fully charged so battery usage is not really a problem.
If you want to test it why don't you run it with a battery charger connected up to the battery you plan to use & put some water in a conainer, e.g. ice cream container & see how long it takes to freeze it. This is just one man's opinion but I reckon the trailblaizer is one of the best portable refrigerators ever built. Mine has stood up to some of the roughest road conditions ( & this includes the Cape York Bi-Pass road) in Australia without spring base cushioning like some of the Engels need & not as much as a screw has ever come loose.Have Wheels Will Travel
AnswerID: 44320

Reply By: Bundy - Monday, Jan 26, 2004 at 08:36

Monday, Jan 26, 2004 at 08:36
Robert

We have just updated to a 70L fully optioned Trailblazer. The previous model was a 60L that had travelled round oz twice as well as many other trips.

I have one of the older Trailblazer brochures that states the BD2.5 compressor has a refrigeration capacity of 81watts and current consumption of 5.4 amps (@12V).

They work an example for a BD35F compressor but substituting the figured for the BD2.5 it looks like this...

Carton of stubbies (used as their measure)
Cooled from 32C to 2C
Heat to be removed 1134Kj or 315Watt Hours

315WH/81W=3.88hours
3.88h x 5 amp/h = 20.95 AHs

From this it looks like your stubbies should be 2C in just under 4 hrs and you'll use 21amp/hs to do it. I am only going on the fugures they supplied.

Trailblazers also have a coefficient of performance of 1...that is the compressor uses one unit of energy to remove an equivalent amount of energy. I am not sure what other brands claim.

While this doesn't directly answer your question it may provide some other info.

Cheers

Bundy
AnswerID: 44331

Reply By: haze - Monday, Jan 26, 2004 at 08:57

Monday, Jan 26, 2004 at 08:57
Following other positive comments I also reckon they are beyond doubt the best 12v. compressor fridge available. Have had mine 10yrs. not one problem. Yes, they are bulky, heavy, but mine is bolted permanently in the trayback so dont have to worry!
When I bought mine (new) Norcoast reckoned should easily last 25yrs. I dont doubt them! As we usually camp 4/5 months one spot (work) it is used as a freezer only. meat, frozen veg. fish etc. The energy consumption figures Norcoast provide are quite accurate. I cant say how long it would take to discharge say a 100ah. battery, I use a small honda motor to drive a 12v. car alternator to keep things topped up. This uses about 5l./week.
Dont think you could go wrong.
AnswerID: 44332

Reply By: Member - Des Lexik(SA) - Monday, Jan 26, 2004 at 12:00

Monday, Jan 26, 2004 at 12:00
Robert, I also have a 70litre unit and fully agree with the other's comments in cluding the weight and bulkiness but wouldn't swap it for any thing else. They are a great fridge and the only problem I had was of my own doing. (Changed the cable entry point and arced a bare wire on the cabinet. It was disconnected but it had a residual[I think] current. Norcoast after sales service was excellent.Dare to Lead not to Follow
AnswerID: 44345

Follow Up By: robert4615 - Wednesday, Jan 28, 2004 at 00:16

Wednesday, Jan 28, 2004 at 00:16
good day to everyone. thanks for helping and for all the positive responses. just purchased my 60L trailblazer today. the unit is 9 years old, at 26c empty, the fridge got to zero in 50 mins. i was impressed, considering the low power consumption. talked to trailblazer today and several times before. they have always been very helpful. ask for bruce[ one of the techs] great fellow. cheers to all. robert
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