tyre pressure monitoring systems

Submitted: Wednesday, Jan 23, 2013 at 08:10
ThreadID: 100136 Views:3228 Replies:9 FollowUps:6
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Thinking of putting a tyre pressure monitoring system on the wagon and the van, only have a single axle on the van and would like the opportunity of knowing if there is a problem with tyres on the van developing leaks etc before something bad happens. Would like some feedback on the various types available if anyone has had expierence with any problems with any particular type. Not sure which way to go ie the type that goes into the tyre or the screw on cap type, and are they as good as they promote themselves. Any feedback appreciated. Is dust or water a problem with them.
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Reply By: Member - Frank P (NSW) - Wednesday, Jan 23, 2013 at 09:02

Wednesday, Jan 23, 2013 at 09:02
Brian,
We have a Tyredog 6 wheel relayless system which works well for us. Tyredog sensors are the screw-on cap type. On rubber valve stems they bang around a fair bit on dirt roads and may damage themselves on the rim, but you can minimise that with a lump of stiff foam cut to shape and fitted over the sensor. On the Prado's alloys with solid valve stems, they're fine.

Although they indicate tyre pressure on the display I think you have to accept that they're not particularly accurate - use a gauge for that. But they DO indicate when a tyre pressure is changing, and that's what you want.

They also indicate tyre temperature, which I think is useless as they're outside the tyre and subject to ambient conditions.

There are other types of external sensors which may be more accurate, but I'm happy enough with these - they have saved two tyres, so have paid for themselves.

Cheers





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Follow Up By: Echucan Bob - Wednesday, Jan 23, 2013 at 13:06

Wednesday, Jan 23, 2013 at 13:06
Frank, the temperatures that a tyre can generate are way higher than ambient. High ambient and road temperatures will reduce the rate at which heat will dissipate from an overheated tyre, but a tyre can be destroyed by thermal damage even in cool conditions. A tyre that is generating too much heat may well maintain a fairly steady pressure, but suddenly delaminate through thermal damage. The amount of heat generated in a tyre is determined by side wall bagging, load and speed. Obviously a tyre bags when the pressure is too low for the load carried. Thats why its important to travel slowly when tyres are deflated for increased traction. So I regard the temperature of my tyres almost as important as the pressure. If one tyre starts to overheat its time to pull over and address the problem before a blow out occurs. When the blow out occurs your pressure alarm will sound, but too late to be of any use.
Bob
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Follow Up By: Member - Frank P (NSW) - Wednesday, Jan 23, 2013 at 22:42

Wednesday, Jan 23, 2013 at 22:42
That's exactly my point, Bob. The external Tyredogs don't properly sense the tyre's temperature because they (the Tyredogs) are in the breeze sensing ambient, not sensing the tyre temperature....

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Follow Up By: Echucan Bob - Saturday, Jan 26, 2013 at 14:06

Saturday, Jan 26, 2013 at 14:06
Frank, I see what you mean. I still think that the conducted heat through the stem gives meaningful information about temp changes in the tyre.
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Reply By: Great Divide Tours - Wednesday, Jan 23, 2013 at 09:24

Wednesday, Jan 23, 2013 at 09:24
I have used the tyredog system for several years now on most of my tour vehicles, they are well worth the money, over time they do fail but everything wears out, I find they read about 1-2 psi low but that is OK once you become aware of this discrepancy. Batteries last about 12 months with a lot of use and I have the main unit hard wired to save on battery use in it. Tyre monitoring systems are now mandatory on all new vehicles sold in USA, not that everything they do is right, but this time I agree.
Vic
AnswerID: 503192

Reply By: Effie C (Ex NT now ACT) - Wednesday, Jan 23, 2013 at 11:35

Wednesday, Jan 23, 2013 at 11:35
We have a 8 units Tyredog unit with rear relay, batteries went flat in relay and after replacing them (hard wired relay) the head unit now only finds the relay but receives no info from tyre sensors, have fitted new batteries to all sensors but still no go. Spoke to Tyredog in Vic. And they have suggested to pack them all up and send back to them for repair. When they were operations as per previous replies they worked ok but we're not accurate and there was no consistencie between the 8 sensors as to a few psi above or below as they all had their own discrepencies
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Reply By: Member - Geoff M (VIC) - Wednesday, Jan 23, 2013 at 12:44

Wednesday, Jan 23, 2013 at 12:44
Hi Brian,

I've got the TPMS system that has been OK. Have had several sensors faill but TPMS have promptly supplied replacement one's at no cost. It is the screw-on type.

Cheers, Geoff
AnswerID: 503207

Follow Up By: brian s - Wednesday, Jan 23, 2013 at 17:42

Wednesday, Jan 23, 2013 at 17:42
Has anyone tried the Inawise brand, I've heard there is a problem with getting the tyre properly balanced using these type of system. Also is there a chance the screwq on type could come lose on a corrugated road and is it just a matter of tapping over the sensor cap to stop this.
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Follow Up By: AlbyNSW - Thursday, Jan 24, 2013 at 19:57

Thursday, Jan 24, 2013 at 19:57
Brian S I am getting the Inawise ones fitted tomorrow so cannot comment personally on them yet but that type of unit is commonly used as OEM equipment by many companies so do not expect an issue
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Reply By: Echucan Bob - Wednesday, Jan 23, 2013 at 13:17

Wednesday, Jan 23, 2013 at 13:17
Tyre Pressure Monitoring System - comparison





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Reply By: BFreer - Wednesday, Jan 23, 2013 at 19:38

Wednesday, Jan 23, 2013 at 19:38
I tried the Tyredog system - had a few problems and Co. gave a full refund, much appreciated. Then tried the S&T system (rebranded TPMS system ) but a bit cheaper, thru AutoGizmo. Had a problem with sensors occasionally dropping out - then replaced rubber valve stems with metal valve stems ($7/tyre fitted) and no problem since.
AnswerID: 503232

Reply By: Geoff (Newcastle, NSW) - Wednesday, Jan 23, 2013 at 22:31

Wednesday, Jan 23, 2013 at 22:31
I have the Sensa Tyre system with the sensors strapped into the well of the rim using hose clamps.

I don't have a camper or caravan but do have two spares therefore my system has 6 sensors.

As far as I'm concerned it works great and has saved me from potentially destroying at least 3 tyres since I've installed it.

My system is capable of supporting a camper or caravan and comes with a remote antenna to mount at the rear of the vehicle to ensure the trailed vehicle sensors are seen correctly.
I chose the sensors strapped to the rim well because as far as I'm concerned tyres, valve stems, valve caps and tubes are all consumable items on a vehicle. The rims are not.

My sensors are part of the rim, the reusable item.

An awful lot of people get attached to the idea of knowing exactly were on the vehicle each wheel is located.
For me, I don't care.

As far as I'm concerned the Sensa Tyre system is there to tell me I have a developing problems, not solve it for me.

Once the alarm goes off I pull over and have a look. I engage the Mark I tyre checking device.
These system are designed as a tool, not a solution.

For what you ask pretty much every system on the market will meet your needs.

Just view them as a smart hammer, not a solution.
Geoff,
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Reply By: glids - Thursday, Jan 24, 2013 at 09:43

Thursday, Jan 24, 2013 at 09:43
Repco have Tyredog 4 sensor units on sale from today to 30th Jan for $199 - approx half price. I don't know if they will sell the 6 or 8 sensor units at reduced prices.

cheers,
glids
AnswerID: 503275

Follow Up By: brian s - Thursday, Jan 24, 2013 at 10:38

Thursday, Jan 24, 2013 at 10:38
thanks glids i will check them out
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Reply By: JohnnyC - Thursday, Jan 24, 2013 at 18:06

Thursday, Jan 24, 2013 at 18:06
I bought a TyreDog system a couple of years ago after doing two good BFG tyres due to overheating, the recommended pressure was way too low.
I have split rims, easy to repair on the road, and the tubes have metal stems, the sensors screw onto the valve stem, the pressure indication is accurate to within 1 psi, and not sure about the Temp accuracy but it seems close to ambient at the start and certainly increases as we travel, I have the alarm set at 70 degC and it gets close on a 40 degC day so it does work, it must sense the heat of the valve stem.
If there is a crosswind the downwind side will be a few deg higher than the upwind side which was a worry till I figured it out
They stick out a bit so if there is a chance of damaging them you can easily remove them, no more difficult than deflating the tyres.
With internal sensor types, there is a good chance of damaging them when removing the tyre from the rim.
I have not had any trouble with the system and would recommend it, I think it cost about $300, cheaper than a tyre.
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