New shockers for IFS 100 Series Cruiser

Howdy all,

My father-in-law has just bought a 100 series cruiser, and overall he's happy with his purchase. He intends to use it to tow a large caravan and perhaps do a little bit of light off-road work, but for the most part it will be on the tarmac.

He's mentioned that he reckons that the shockers are on their way out. I'm pretty sure they are the OEM kit.

I'm just looking at getting some recommendations for good shockers that will hold up to towing. Also if you have any other recommendations for suspension upgrades - springs, torsion bars - and how they affect drivability would be handy too.

Cheers,

James
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Reply By: baz&pud (tassie) - Thursday, Feb 07, 2013 at 09:14

Thursday, Feb 07, 2013 at 09:14
G'day James W13,

We have a 2002 V8 Cruiser and toe a near three ton van.

Vehicle was purchased new and soon after had a Pedders suspension kit fitted, which
consisted of stronger shockers, stronger rear springs fitted with air bags.

The cruiser has now towed a van in excess of a hundred thousand ks and we have had no trouble what so ever.

Have no interest in Pedders.

Cheers
Baz
Go caravaning, life is so much shorter than death.

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AnswerID: 504241

Reply By: MEMBER - Darian, SA - Thursday, Feb 07, 2013 at 11:19

Thursday, Feb 07, 2013 at 11:19
Bought my 100 at the Government auctions - the department that had it from new had an Old Man Emu suspension upgrade installed straight off - lifted the front about 35mm - the rear about 50mm via up-spec torsion bars and coils - shocks were included too. In my view, the towing was great right from the start - our van is 18' / 2800kg ATM. One change that I made was to retire the original EMU shocks (I wanted some field spares for the travel kit anyway).... got a pair of Bilstein mono tube gas units for the front and TJM XGS gas units for the rear - my rationale was that the mono Bilsteins should run cooler than most and not suffer from stone damage at the front - the XGS's are large twin tubes and have an outer stone shield so are more suited to the flying stones on gravel roads.
AnswerID: 504249

Follow Up By: Ross M - Thursday, Feb 07, 2013 at 13:29

Thursday, Feb 07, 2013 at 13:29
G'day Darian
You are the first person I have noticed who has the stone issue in mind.
Excellent choice for the front and it is as you said., cooler.
Your rears are able to take a hit or two where Bilsteins in that position would require a stone shield as you realize.

Previously I have used some OME but found them to only last a short time before a large degradation of performance is noticed.

I have two sets of OME which sort of act like shocks, look like shocks, but don't perform, despite not being used in rough stuff or having travelled long distances either. Nice and Yellow though.

You retired your OME's, mine retired all by themselves. Really poor value.

Ross M
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Follow Up By: MEMBER - Darian, SA - Thursday, Feb 07, 2013 at 15:08

Thursday, Feb 07, 2013 at 15:08
The IFS design on the cruiser means that the front shocker is quite small - therefore, my simplistic thinking is that the relatively small amount of gas and oil in there must get awfully hot, so the mono tube choice makes sense to me. As mentioned on this page, Koni's are a good mono product too, but as I recall there wasn't one for my 100 at the time. I had Koni's on my Jackaroo and they went very well on a number of bush trips (adjustable too, to compensate for wear). As for the XGS's - huge things - they look like mortar barrels, compared to the front units. Greater size, with more gas, oil and exterior barrel surface means that cooling should not be a huge problem.
Oh... and as David O has jogged my memory - the XGS's can be chosen as oil only, or oil and gas (I can't recall the advantage offered by oil only). Bilsteins and Konis can cost quite a bit more pound for pound, but with reputation, reconditioning (Bilstein) and adjustment (Koni) on offer, they might actually be worth it :-o).
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FollowupID: 781042

Follow Up By: Olsen's 4WD Tours and Training - Thursday, Feb 07, 2013 at 18:08

Thursday, Feb 07, 2013 at 18:08
The argument of straight oil is that on corrugated roads even a small amount of gas gets much hotter than straight oil I guess due to the compressibility of the gas- I've verified this with temperature measurement on the Canning on various vehicles - the staight oil runs cooler.

For 100% highway speed use fade is an issue with straight oil, hence the gas to stop foaming, but in the bush, I'd prefer straight oil, particularly on bad corrugations.

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FollowupID: 781052

Follow Up By: Olsen's 4WD Tours and Training - Thursday, Feb 07, 2013 at 18:59

Thursday, Feb 07, 2013 at 18:59
I wish there was an edit facility. Let me try to punctuate the above a little better-

For 100% highway speed use, fade is an issue when using straight oil dampers, hence the gas which is to stop foaming, but in the bush, I'd prefer straight oil, particularly on bad corrugations.
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Reply By: Olsen's 4WD Tours and Training - Thursday, Feb 07, 2013 at 11:31

Thursday, Feb 07, 2013 at 11:31
I use and highly recommend Konis. Mine are no gas straight oil.
AnswerID: 504250

Follow Up By: Olsen's 4WD Tours and Training - Thursday, Feb 07, 2013 at 11:32

Thursday, Feb 07, 2013 at 11:32
And King's springs
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Follow Up By: Mick O - Thursday, Feb 07, 2013 at 17:33

Thursday, Feb 07, 2013 at 17:33
Yep,

second that. I'm using Toughdog big bore adjustables which I have found to be excellent. Konig will be the replacement of choice (if I can secure the loan lol). Very expensive but worth every penny.

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trip would doubtless be attended with much hardship.''
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Reply By: Bazooka - Thursday, Feb 07, 2013 at 16:10

Thursday, Feb 07, 2013 at 16:10
Unless he has money to burn there's no point in going top of the range (eg Bilstein gas) for the uses you've mentioned. Twin tube oils will do the trick.


I found this bloke very helpful:ZORDOS
AnswerID: 504256

Reply By: Ross M - Thursday, Feb 07, 2013 at 23:40

Thursday, Feb 07, 2013 at 23:40
I'm not sure if you are open to buying on the internet.
Although there is some risk there can also be advantages ie cost/saving.
Never having purchased overseas before, but I bought 4 Bilstein shocks for a Dmax which took 6 days to get the the Aussie address after they were sent from the USA.

No warranty, but they were made in Germany and shipped to USA. USA sent them to me and the cost was $437 which included $139 shipping.
Same things here in Australia with warranty, imported from Germany costs $880.

Worth investigating.
I understand an Aussie importer must make a profit and has to give warranty but it is hard to see why such a difference in price can exist given the double/shipping delivery of mine.

Buying like this gets you a quality product at prices here of just cheap shockers.
AnswerID: 504279

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