Scam? Comments sought

Submitted: Tuesday, Jan 27, 2004 at 19:01
ThreadID: 10059 Views:1634 Replies:14 FollowUps:6
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I have been contacted by an alleged dealer in West Africa regarding the landrover I am trying to sell thru Adventrue Trader on this site. Having heard all the stories about scams originating in Nigeria and similar places I am a bit wary about this one. The guy claims to be a dealer in West Africa (country not specified) and tells me he is agreeable with my price - sight unseen. He then tells me he has another client in the US who owes him over 3 times what I'm asking, and requests my full name and address so he can get this client to send the money direct to me, and have me forward the excess to him via western union money transfer.
This seems rather dodgy to me, and I was wondering if other Trader users had had similar experiences, and what ohter users thought about it?
Cheers, Alex.
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Reply By: Pluto - Tuesday, Jan 27, 2004 at 19:09

Tuesday, Jan 27, 2004 at 19:09
Any email that suggests the transaction includes a payment from a third party is a scam.Get out there & have Fun!!!
AnswerID: 44513

Reply By: ExplorOz Team - David - Tuesday, Jan 27, 2004 at 19:11

Tuesday, Jan 27, 2004 at 19:11
DO NOT REPLY TO THIS RUBBISH. CERTAINLY DO NOT GIVE OUT PERSONAL DETAILS.

We have been hit with a few crappy things in the trader in the last two days. We have this guy and we have a vehicle dealer in Japan trying to get people to import vehicles from him.

Please let me know if you see more of this type of crap - I have blacklisted these email addresses from the system.

Do not reply to anyone that you think is not legimate as the reply action sends an email direct from you.Regards
ExplorOz Team - David
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Always working, not enough travelling ;-)
AnswerID: 44515

Follow Up By: ExplorOz Team - David - Tuesday, Jan 27, 2004 at 19:13

Tuesday, Jan 27, 2004 at 19:13
PS - Please forward me directly anything you suspect is a scam or rubbish - I will take action and blacklist these email address or advise you if I believe they are legimate. Regards
ExplorOz Team - David
--------------------------
Always working, not enough travelling ;-)
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FollowupID: 306689

Follow Up By: Alex H - Tuesday, Jan 27, 2004 at 20:53

Tuesday, Jan 27, 2004 at 20:53
David, can't find an email address for you guys, and I'm sorry I'm creating more work for you - you do a great job with thesite.
blacklist this email address - williams0042002@graffiti.net
Cheers,
Alex
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FollowupID: 306705

Follow Up By: ExplorOz Team - David - Tuesday, Jan 27, 2004 at 21:40

Tuesday, Jan 27, 2004 at 21:40
Alex,

All of our details are on the About Us page in the menu. Anyway I have already listed this email address in the blacklist. Thanks anyway.Regards
ExplorOz Team - David
--------------------------
Always working, not enough travelling ;-)
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FollowupID: 306710

Reply By: crfan - Tuesday, Jan 27, 2004 at 19:24

Tuesday, Jan 27, 2004 at 19:24
It`s a SCAM they are getting people off ebay as well,
The way it works is you get acheque put it your account it goes through
then you send the guy the differance in the money and the the origanal cheque bounces.(somthing to do with over seas transactions.
I saw this explained on a web sight not that long ago but cant think which one.
try snopes.com
AnswerID: 44517

Reply By: Bonz (Vic) - Tuesday, Jan 27, 2004 at 19:26

Tuesday, Jan 27, 2004 at 19:26
Almost as believeeable as " I am a student at a large mid-western university. I never thought something like this would happen to me until last night................ hahahah send the excess to me and I will contact the guy is S AFRICAIf you hold your heart and focus,
you will end up holding your dream
AnswerID: 44518

Reply By: crfan - Tuesday, Jan 27, 2004 at 19:28

Tuesday, Jan 27, 2004 at 19:28
Found it here it it off snopes...

Claim: Vehicle sellers advertising online should trust buyers who pay with cashier checks made out for amounts in excess of the agreed-upon purchase price and ask the balances be sent to third parties.
Status: False.

Example: [Collected on the Internet, 2003]

My husband is currently selling his motorcycle online. Last week when he posted his bike he recieved an email from a hotmail account stating he was interested in buying his bike and he is located in West Africa. He mentioned that he knows someone in the US that owes him money and would like to get our address to meet and make the exchange and that he would pay for all shipping charges. Well, a friend of ours, his cousin is also selling his bike. And he got the same email, but from a different email and name. That sounds funny to me. Well, my husband re-posted his bike yesterday online and he received from another person just about the same email about him residing in West Africa.


Origins: An
interesting and highly lucrative con targeting those attempting to sell vehicles online debuted in the summer of 2002. Like the highly successful Nigerian scam, this new bit of larceny also features businessmen from Africa intent upon closing odd-sounding deals. Only in this case, it is not the pigeons' greed that traps them, it's their honesty.

The scam works like this:

Person looking to sell a used car or motorcycle advertises the vehicle on the Internet.

The unsuspecting seller is contacted in e-mail by a prospective buyer who hails from somewhere in Africa, usually Nigeria. This buyer agrees to the asked-for price without haggling and looks for immediate assurance the vehicle will not be sold to anyone but him. He offers to have someone pick up and ship the vehicle to Africa once the sale is complete, making it clear he alone will bear all charges associated with that aspect of the sale.

Mention is now made of the method of payment: a cashier's check for more than the agreed-upon price for the vehicle. This check is to come from the buyer in Africa, with the residue to be sent to a third party in the USA the buyer says he owes money to. The seller is asked to cash the check, keep the right amount for the sale of his car or bike, and send what's left to this third party. (Alternatively, the check is said to be coming from the third party, with the residue after the vehicle is paid for to be sent back to the buyer.)

Example 1: Dr. Dipo Morgans of Nigeria wants to buy your used car for $5,000. His friend, Mr. Okuta, will be sending you a cashier's check for $8,000. You are to keep $5,000 for the car and send the remaining $3,000 to Dr. Morgans.

Example 2: Dr. Dipo Morgans of Nigeria wants to buy your used car for $5,000. He will be sending you a cashier's check for $8,000 on the understanding that you will forward $3,000 of it to the shipping company that will be transporting your car to Africa.

The cashier check for the larger-than-necessary amount arrives and is duly deposited in the seller's bank account.

Three days later, the check appears to clear, and any freeze the bank had placed on these funds is removed.

Satisfied that the check was good (the bank had released the funds, after all), the seller wires the overage to the person it's owed to and waits for someone to come pick up the vehicle.

No one ever comes to pick up the vehicle.

Two weeks later, the seller is informed by his bank the check was a forgery.

The seller is now out the amount he wired to someone else.
In some versions of the scam, the buyer is not an individual but rather an agent for a firm that purchases cars on behalf of others, often diplomats stationed in foreign lands. This car broker is usually located in Africa.

The "reason" for the inflated-value check will vary from one attempt to defraud to another. Currency exchange problems will be cited. Or a horrified buyer will realize he's had the check prepared for far too large an amount. Or the check is being sent by a third party for the full amount this other person supposedly owes the buyer. Or it's a refund check for a failed sale for something that would have cost more. Or it would take 30 days to clear a check from Africa, hence the need to have an American third party send the payment. The reasons are many. And varied. And false.

Cars or motorcycles aren't the only items to attract this form of scam — those attempting to sell horses have experienced it too. It's not unreasonable to extrapolate those attempting to sell boats will be similarly targeted. What matters is not the nature of the item being offered for sale but its price — it has to be high enough to justify the seller's feeling comfortable in sending thousands of his own dollars to a stranger under the mistaken belief he's already holding an even greater sum in his hand.

The scam works because the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. (FDIC) requires banks to make money from cashier's, certified, or teller's checks available in one to five days. Consequently, funds from checks that might not be good are often released into payees' accounts long before the checks have been honored by their issuing banks. High quality forgeries can be bounced back and forth between banks for weeks before anyone catches on to their being worthless, by which time victims have long since wired the "overpayments" to the con artists who have just taken them for a ride.

Although this scam is new, real people have already been bilked out of thousands of dollars by it — in some cases tens of thousands. The con has claimed victims in communities across the USA, so don't let its newness lull you into a false sense of security. That the game is new doesn't mean it's not dangerous.

Barbara "cheque and cheque again" Mikkelson

What You Can Do:
No matter how sweet the deal, don't get involved in any sale where the buyer wants you to accept a check for an inflated amount and refund the overage.

If you accept a cashier's check as payment for something you have sold, make sure it has cleared the issuing bank before you refund any money or surrender possession of the vended item. It may take two to three weeks for the banking system to determine the check is counterfeit, so even if the funds look like they're available (and even if your bank tells you they are), hold onto whatever it was you sold and the funds you received for it for three weeks.

If you have been bilked, call the U.S. Secret Service at (202) 406-5572 or write to U.S. Secret Service, Financial Crimes Division, 950 H St. N.W., Washington, DC 20223. Also, call your state attorney general's consumer protection division.

Last updated: 7 September 2003
AnswerID: 44519

Reply By: howesy - Tuesday, Jan 27, 2004 at 19:35

Tuesday, Jan 27, 2004 at 19:35
Look up ASIO's head office address or maybe the fraud or major crime squad and give them that address.
AnswerID: 44520

Reply By: ExplorOz Team - David - Tuesday, Jan 27, 2004 at 19:52

Tuesday, Jan 27, 2004 at 19:52
These accounts are all going on the new blacklist - Why new because of these gooses I have to spend hours writing and debugging new code to kill off users email accounts. This list has doubled in size in one day. Please as mentioned before just send me noticifation of any junk coming via the system and I will kill it off as best I can.Regards
ExplorOz Team - David
--------------------------
Always working, not enough travelling ;-)
AnswerID: 44524

Reply By: Vojta - Tuesday, Jan 27, 2004 at 20:05

Tuesday, Jan 27, 2004 at 20:05
roll the dice and see...

accept the deal and when the chq comes in take it to one of those instant pay day advance places get the money on the spot and let them worry about the forged cheque, god knows some of these 'sharks' (instant loan offices) deserve a little of their own back.

Vojta.

AnswerID: 44526

Follow Up By: goingplatinumcomau - Tuesday, Jan 27, 2004 at 20:44

Tuesday, Jan 27, 2004 at 20:44
LOL That was so Funny

As usual if it sounds to good to be true it isnt.
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FollowupID: 306703

Follow Up By: Member - StevenL - Tuesday, Jan 27, 2004 at 20:44

Tuesday, Jan 27, 2004 at 20:44
What chance those guys coughing up cash?

Somewhere between Buckleys and sweet FAPrado GXL TD Manual
It's on order, Delivery in April '04.
This pic will have to do till then. Can't wait!!!
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FollowupID: 306704

Reply By: Member - Ross - Tuesday, Jan 27, 2004 at 21:51

Tuesday, Jan 27, 2004 at 21:51
SCAM SCAM SCAM .... CON CON CON !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!Fidei defensor

Rosco
AnswerID: 44542

Follow Up By: Bonz (Vic) - Wednesday, Jan 28, 2004 at 18:30

Wednesday, Jan 28, 2004 at 18:30
Can we Bilk Him, Yes we Con! hahahahaIf you hold your heart and focus,
you will end up holding your dream
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FollowupID: 306798

Reply By: cwebb - Tuesday, Jan 27, 2004 at 22:23

Tuesday, Jan 27, 2004 at 22:23
Absolutely, categorically a scam. Good advice as per above posts.
I've read the exact same thing that was happening to Americans that were selling cars on Ebay.
If you want to read about this sort of stuff, visit www.scamorama.com
There are also funny stories in there that have people "anti-scamming" the scammers, which is really just trying to waste their time and also stories from people that have been sucked in by these African scammers in one way or another, including the one described above. Worth a look, whether to have a laugh or to actually understand these scumbags better.
AnswerID: 44559

Reply By: Alex H - Tuesday, Jan 27, 2004 at 22:29

Tuesday, Jan 27, 2004 at 22:29
THANK YOU TO EVERYONE WHO ANSWERED MY QUERY. I HAVE DELETED ALL CORRESPONDANCE TO THIS A**HOLE AND ONCE AGAIN THANK YOU FOR ALL YOUR HELP.

We 4wders have to stick together - my faith in Australia and Australians has been reaffirmed - you're a bunch of great blokes!!
Cheers,
Alex
AnswerID: 44563

Reply By: Member - StevenL - Tuesday, Jan 27, 2004 at 22:45

Tuesday, Jan 27, 2004 at 22:45
As someone said somewhere above - If it looks too good to be true is probably is.

These days if you see a $50 note on the sidewalk it is probably only because some a!!hole from reality TV glued it there and is ready to leap out with camera and microphone and yell SURPRISE!!! you're on national shmuckTV.

As Mulder says - Trust No-one.

StevenLPrado GXL TD Manual
It's on order, Delivery in April '04.
This pic will have to do till then. Can't wait!!!
AnswerID: 44568

Reply By: Member - Toonfish - Wednesday, Jan 28, 2004 at 00:09

Wednesday, Jan 28, 2004 at 00:09
this same scam was trried om me via ebay a few months back.
too good to be true as a precaution i later forwarded to a friend in asip who put it to federal police.
had me going for a while too.1999 NISSAN NAVARA DUALCAB
DIESEL 3.2 & SPRINGY CARLTON TOY
2 awestruck kids (dads driving!)
AnswerID: 44579

Reply By: wazza - Wednesday, Jan 28, 2004 at 07:54

Wednesday, Jan 28, 2004 at 07:54
Alex,

you could always make up a fake hotmail address and lead this guy on (take the p*ss).

This was supposedly done with one of the Nigerian scam emails where a guy used the name Harry Potter to lead on the scammer. Here is a link. Makes for funny reading in the too and fro correspondence between them.

http://www.scamorama.com/harrypotter-ayokure.html
AnswerID: 44584

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