Do you pick up Hitch Hikers ?

Submitted: Friday, Mar 22, 2013 at 08:10
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2 days ago I picked up a 60 year old out of Yara Glen (Vic) carrying nothing but a small bag and got quite a different view on life over the next 100km.

Was a farmer from gippsland who didn't talk much but gave me his name and address as soon as he got in the car I guess sort of trying to show he was bonna-fide.

I'm semi retired driving around all over the place just for the fun of exploring but I soon learnt there is another side of life as this guy said the bank was selling his Angus beef property to recover debt and he had no money and nothing to show for 40 years hard work.
Never been away from the farm in gippsland in his life and this was his first ever bit of involuntary exploring.

With no money, food or car he and his wife had an offer of a farming job with board from a friend 600 km away in NSW.

He had no idea where the NSW town was and they spent there last dollars on 1 train ticket.
He put his wife on the train while he had no option but to hitch hike as best he could.

I soon learnt everyone from the city was to be regarded with suspicion - he told me he did have $3 dollars left if I wanted it.
I think this was a way of giving me a message that he wasn't worth mugging - seems incredible doesn't it , and I only took this view after he said he had to only valuable things in world other than his wife , a wedding ring and a watch - his wife carried them so that they wouldn't be lost if he was actually mugged.

After a few questions it became obvious he really didn't know where he was or how he was going to get to his destination.
(Reminded me of when we departed the Madigan line for unknown territory recently with just a vague idea of direction - post 88482)

A few minutes before I picked him up the cops had stopped him and said hitch hiking was illegal on highways(?) and another car had given him the finger salute

I felt sorry for him and at the next town I brought him a cup of coffee.

A 100km later as I turn off the highway in Yarck at the bus station I had made up mind to help him catch up to his wife and had $20 for a bus ticket in my hand
to give him , but he got out of the car and took his bag so quickly that by the time I was out of the car he was halfway across the road calling out thanks.

I probably could have chased him but in those two seconds I summed up the previous hour and thought there was no point and that he had contributed to his own situation in life a lot and anyway I'm just a city slicker.

Was I right or wrong ?
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Reply By: Racey - Friday, Mar 22, 2013 at 09:01

Friday, Mar 22, 2013 at 09:01
I'm sure this story is repeated in many parts of Australia. The bank has taken everything but his pride.
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Follow Up By: Robin Miller - Friday, Mar 22, 2013 at 11:14

Friday, Mar 22, 2013 at 11:14
I got that impression and that he was gun shy as a result wanting the minimum contact with strangers needed to achieve his travel objective Racey.
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Follow Up By: Racey - Friday, Mar 22, 2013 at 16:24

Friday, Mar 22, 2013 at 16:24
Robin, if that was the case why accept the coffee.
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Follow Up By: Robin Miller - Friday, Mar 22, 2013 at 16:49

Friday, Mar 22, 2013 at 16:49
Good question Racey - I ordered 1 extra hot coffee and asked him and he said just warm , the shop assitant then asked "Cup or takeaway " ? he answered take away its quicker, before I could answer , and his was made first and it was drunk by the time mine was made.
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Reply By: Member - Fab72 (Paradise SA) - Friday, Mar 22, 2013 at 09:26

Friday, Mar 22, 2013 at 09:26
G'Day Rob,
Great write up I must say...and I would have loved to have been a fly on the wall.
I've been on both sides of the hitch-hiker fence. I 've only ever picked up 2 in my life (despite seeing hundreds while driving trucks).
One was an old bloke who ended up being drunk as a skunk. Dropped him off 5 kms up the road at the next pub. No story to offer, just a half soaked cigarette which I kindly refused.
The second was was a couple of young ladies on a day it was pouring down raining. Again, it was just a quick drive to the local shops which was exactly where I was headed anyway. They had decided to walk to the shops and had misjudged the weather. I had my daughter in the car so I'm sure they felt safe and my intentions were pure regardless of the fact they were both stunners.
I have however been on the otherside of the deal. I was using my car to drag a dead carcass out of a almost dry dam. I made a poor calculation and ended up with my car bogged half way down the inside of the dam wall. I wasn't game to try too much knowing gravity had different ideas than me. I walked 6kms to the main road to hitch hike into town to get some help. This was way back in the era before mobile phones and the terrain prevented UHF coverage.
Anyway....long story short, no-one picked me up. I ended up walking the additional 8kms back into town til I got to the first public phone box.
Nothing as interesting as your story.
So did you do the right thing leaving him there...?
You'll never know. If he is a legit cocky, the bloke is probably too proud to accept hand outs anyway. It is sad though (if totally acurate) that a bank could clean out a bloke until he's got literally only the clothes on his back.
Bastard corporate greed or poor luck/management on his behalf.... another question you'll never know the answer too either.
Fab.
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Follow Up By: Robin Miller - Friday, Mar 22, 2013 at 11:44

Friday, Mar 22, 2013 at 11:44
Actually you made me think FAB - I almost forgot I have a car drive recorder and enclose 1 blurry picture.


Love the dam bit , I have been caught on that one two.

I'll have to admit I have picked more than one odd girl.


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Follow Up By: Member - Fab72 (Paradise SA) - Saturday, Mar 23, 2013 at 17:26

Saturday, Mar 23, 2013 at 17:26
Looks friendly enough Robin....love technology.
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Follow Up By: Member - KEITH W (QLD) - Saturday, Mar 23, 2013 at 19:02

Saturday, Mar 23, 2013 at 19:02
i believe you made the right decision. actually brought a lump to my throat, there are some people out there really doing it tough, i've met some in my travels, always a smile, firm handshake.
i hope he makes it ok, probably will never know.
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Reply By: jacent - Friday, Mar 22, 2013 at 09:27

Friday, Mar 22, 2013 at 09:27
The whole trip I would of been trying to work out if he was full of it and if I decided that he was for real I would of tried to locate the address for him on a map and give it to him, and then try give him the money for the bus plus a bit extra for food but as you said some people are soo proud no matter what you do they wont accept help, hence why you hear of farmers shooting themselves when faced with losing everything after working so hard. Very sad indeed!
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Follow Up By: Robin Miller - Friday, Mar 22, 2013 at 16:54

Friday, Mar 22, 2013 at 16:54
Yes Jacent , I was trying to work it out as you suggest.

Apart from a town name all he had was a phone number - and he would call once it was only a local call (I guess phone boxes still exist ).
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Reply By: Member - wicket - Friday, Mar 22, 2013 at 09:54

Friday, Mar 22, 2013 at 09:54
well the guy seemed like a bit of a dimwit, so no wonder he couldn't make a go of his farm
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Follow Up By: Rockape - Friday, Mar 22, 2013 at 11:30

Friday, Mar 22, 2013 at 11:30
wicket,
If the story is true and it probably is. Can you imagine the state of that persons mind.

One day you or I could find ourselves in that position, so my way is to show a bit of empathy and don't be to quick to judge. Ever wondered why the suicide rate of farmers is so high. Ever planted crops and plowed them back in, year after year because of drought. Meanwhile the bank debt is getting higher and higher.

RA.
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Follow Up By: pop2jocem - Friday, Mar 22, 2013 at 11:44

Friday, Mar 22, 2013 at 11:44
wicket,

Are you serious, or are you just trying to get a bite??

Pop
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Follow Up By: Lyn W3 - Friday, Mar 22, 2013 at 11:45

Friday, Mar 22, 2013 at 11:45
A little harsh Wicket,

Here is a fitting article on:
Rural Suicide

It is a real shame that there are still people out there with your attitude.
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Follow Up By: bluefella - Friday, Mar 22, 2013 at 12:21

Friday, Mar 22, 2013 at 12:21
Words fail me wickett, on second thought 22%$##87^%%%%%%^^^^66####33(((999&&&&&&&&.
glad I GOT THAT OFF ME' CHEST.
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Follow Up By: mountainman - Saturday, Mar 23, 2013 at 03:29

Saturday, Mar 23, 2013 at 03:29
this is happening all over WA wheatbelt.
theyve toiled over their land for 40years..
and as the seasons got worse, got more into debt to put a crop in to get themselves back on track, only to suffer season after season..
crops failing, and after all this, their land has devalued, no small part on the supermarket price war.. 1 dollar for a loaf of bread, and then you only have to see what a 1 dollar a litre for milk is doing to the dairy industry.
NO ONE goes to work, 12mnths and waits to get a return on their labour to make a profit, breakeven or make a loss..
they deserve the respect of all australians, they gamble on the weather to make a living, of some what the supermarket war is destroying any future farmers wishing to start on the land.

this story is happening all the time.
alot of these farmers are from settlement blocks given to them for their war service, SHOW RESPECT !!
what your not hearing is the high suicide rates, because these people dont have a farm just for a business, its their way of life, where they grew up, raised family, made a home, a life and have generations grown up on the farm, the land gets into your blood..
brings an inner peace to the soul..
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Reply By: olcoolone - Friday, Mar 22, 2013 at 10:31

Friday, Mar 22, 2013 at 10:31
It's hard to gauge if it was true or false (and I don't mean what happened to Robin).

We had a guy stroll into our workshop about 7pm one wet night, wanted to know if we wanted to buy some equipment he had from his farm that was a forced sales..... he needed the money to pay for a new turbo for his truck so he could pick it up from the repairer and and head west to try and get work.

He gave us a big sob story for about 20 minutes and told us about this farm equipment and if we paid him he would drop it around as soon as he had his truck back on the road.

We declined his offer and he went on his way...... little did he know some of the companies he mentioned we do work for, so the next morning I was on the phone to them and they had a similar story told to them but the information was different, it turned out he had approached others seeking money.

The hardest thing is you don't know the real truth and if it was true was the whole truth being told, people can become very smart and professional in what they do if they can make money from it.

Over the years we have learnt to trust nobody who we don't know..... sad but true and as for picking up hitch hikers... arrhh NO, it's good be a good Samaritan but it's no good being a dead or injured one.

Most think of con artists and people with a bad past being young with piercing and body art...... young ones eventually turn old and they usually get more wiser when older.
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Follow Up By: Robin Miller - Friday, Mar 22, 2013 at 17:02

Friday, Mar 22, 2013 at 17:02
Isn't it just fascinating Old Kool one when you know the real story behind some line someone is telling you - and even better when you lead them on a little and see which way they jump.

One of my favourite books is called "The games people play" and I often see the books words of wisdom in real life.
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Follow Up By: olcoolone - Friday, Mar 22, 2013 at 17:34

Friday, Mar 22, 2013 at 17:34
I think we are heading to a sad society..... It would be nice to think when I needed help someone who I don't know would be there to help and lend a hand but I would understand is nobody offered.

These days you can never be too sure if they are telling the truth and what may be the consequences if you did or didn't offer help.

There are many out there who have an interesting life story.

At work we get people crying poverty and giving us a bad luck story and then we have others who are down and out who are either to proud or not looking for a hand out who don't argue with the price .... it brings a smile to every ones face when you do offer help to those not expecting it and it makes you understand how $50 can mean so much to some.
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Reply By: Sutto - Friday, Mar 22, 2013 at 11:10

Friday, Mar 22, 2013 at 11:10
As a younger man my friends and I used to hitch a fair bit and when I got a car I started returning the favour. Until one day while my mate was driving to Uni he picked up a guy and dropped him off in Brisbane. Later that day he saw a news bulletin about an escaped murderer from the local prison. Yep that was the guy he had given a lift to. Called the cops and was interviewed for the next couple of hours about every detail. The cops said he was lucky as this guy had a knife on him. My mate said he seemed like a nice bloke at the time lol. After that we stopped picking up hitch hikers. They only got the guy a few years ago working in a hospital up north
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Follow Up By: Member Andys Adventures - Friday, Mar 22, 2013 at 12:33

Friday, Mar 22, 2013 at 12:33
Sutto your mate was lucky, about 40 years ago their was a bloke who would use girls to hitch hike and then when you pulled over to give them a lift he would jump into the car with a gun and take them around to a quiet place a shoot you. He did this 3 times before they caught him. And they only caught him when one of his mates was next on the list and he rang the police. In court he said he wanted to kill 7 people. I have never picked up a hitch hiker since then, even young pretty girls.
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Reply By: Bushranger1 - Friday, Mar 22, 2013 at 13:02

Friday, Mar 22, 2013 at 13:02
G'day all,
My wife & I walked 120km of the Larapinta trail near Alice & tried to hitch a ride back to the Alice but it took 5 hours for someone to stop & offer assistance.

Eventually a kind couple stopped for us but they did not have room in the car for us & our backpacks. They offered to call our friends in Alice but there was no phone service so they said they would do this for us when they got in phone range. Not only did they do this but they drove back to tell us it was all arranged & our lift would arrive in an hour or so. How nice is that!

I can't for the life of me understand why no-one else stopped as a couple of people in their 50's carrying packs doesn't exactly look threatening.

Cheers
Stu
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Follow Up By: Member - Mark (Tamworth NSW) - Friday, Mar 22, 2013 at 14:40

Friday, Mar 22, 2013 at 14:40
Stu
120km on the Larapinta Trail is about 6-7 days worth, after that # of days on that Trail, most of the walkers are a pretty scary sight (& smell) !
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Follow Up By: Bushranger1 - Friday, Mar 22, 2013 at 18:55

Friday, Mar 22, 2013 at 18:55
Good Point!
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Follow Up By: Member - Graeme W (NSW) - Friday, Mar 22, 2013 at 19:46

Friday, Mar 22, 2013 at 19:46
I gave a lady a lift last year who had been walking the Larapinta trail. One of the others she was with had bad blisters and couldn't walk anymore, so she was hitching into Alice Springs to organise transport.

She managed to get a lift to Larapinta drive and lots of people passed her, but when she tried to flag them down they just waved and kept driving. She was getting pretty frustrated when I stopped. She said something like "why would I be in the middle of nowhere just waving at people!".

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Reply By: Member - Andrew - Friday, Mar 22, 2013 at 13:43

Friday, Mar 22, 2013 at 13:43
Robin

I think you did the right thing.
As a young country bloke pre drivers licence, I spent a year getting to work and to trade school by hitch-hiking. I didn't have the option of public transport and I am always thankful for those people, local and strangers who helped me out. heard lots of stories as well as walked lots of miles (no kilometres back then). Been rescued after a few breakdowns as well including one memorable late wet night with wife and new child on board.
I have returned the favour on many occasions and while some have been grumpy or missed the last day or two's shower for the most part they have been grateful and as a said there was often a tale to pass the time.

regards

A
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Follow Up By: Robin Miller - Friday, Mar 22, 2013 at 17:15

Friday, Mar 22, 2013 at 17:15
Hi Andrew

Yep plenty of people have helped me out years ago and I agree with you that its good to return the favours when you reasonably can.
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Reply By: Krooznalong - Friday, Mar 22, 2013 at 14:31

Friday, Mar 22, 2013 at 14:31
G'day Robin
Good yarn as always from you.

Were you right or wrong - buggered if I know. Don't worry about it - just another of life's interesting experiences.

Picked up a hitchhiker once when I lived near Nimbin - was only going to give her a lift to the turnoff to where she wanted to go (a commune) however I decided to go the few miles out of my way to see what was there. Bloody hell - that turned out to be an eye opener. Naked people all over the place. Chicks I didn't mind seeing but the guys were a bit offputting.

Must have been a traumatic experience cause I aint picked up no more hitchhikers since!
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Follow Up By: Robin Miller - Friday, Mar 22, 2013 at 17:21

Friday, Mar 22, 2013 at 17:21
Geez I'm living in the wrong part of the world Krooznalong - nothing so interesting has showed up on my driving recorder - might go back and check a few videos just in case !



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Reply By: Member - Keith A1 - Friday, Mar 22, 2013 at 14:57

Friday, Mar 22, 2013 at 14:57
Hi Robin,
A fascinating story. And I think you are spot-on in your guesses at what the bloke was thinking.
You ask whether you were right or wrong.
An act of kindness to someone going through a bad patch can never be wrong.
And apart from anything else, he is 100km closer to his destination.
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Follow Up By: Robin Miller - Friday, Mar 22, 2013 at 19:25

Friday, Mar 22, 2013 at 19:25
It really was Keith and I thought it might be when as I said the first thing he did on getting in was give me his full name and where he was from , and as you say whatever else, he was 100+ km closer to his goal.
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Reply By: Echucan Bob - Friday, Mar 22, 2013 at 15:29

Friday, Mar 22, 2013 at 15:29
Most of the time we make sure we are secure in our comfort zone - reliable vehicle, plenty of fuel, cash in the pocket, credit card with plenty on it, mobile phone with plenty of juice. It doesn't take much for a few of those things to fail, especially when away from home, and you are totally reliant the kindness of others. So to justify your lack of charity by recounting some apocryphal story about hitch hiking murderers etc means we turn into a nastier, less friendly society.
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Follow Up By: Robin Miller - Friday, Mar 22, 2013 at 19:30

Friday, Mar 22, 2013 at 19:30
I guess thats a reason we like to travel together Bob, even its a loose relationship like with people we talk to on sites like this.
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Reply By: mike g2 - Friday, Mar 22, 2013 at 16:11

Friday, Mar 22, 2013 at 16:11
One could say there's a risk to hitchhikers or people looking like their in trouble. its a shame we have got like this, suspicous of potential foul play when you see/hear of someone in distress of some sort.. risk appplies either way to driver or hitcher. memories of the occasional psycho or robber and so on..
it would seem this case was legitimate, those on the land are well known for their toughness and reluctance to accept loss or failure. this also comes with pride.
situation can get bad so that depression with confusion and suicidal ideology sets in.
read 'east of eden ' for a classic story of farmers pushed /encouraged off the land during bad times in America.
banks do what they can if asked for help, but utimately will run out of options.
we all have chances to do some good in life, even if its at some risk.
MG.
PS: I thought innapropriate comments are looked at by moderator..one of the reply/follow up comments to your story seems in poor taste-the apparent objection was not clarified or reasoned.
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Follow Up By: Robin Miller - Friday, Mar 22, 2013 at 21:44

Friday, Mar 22, 2013 at 21:44
I understand what you are saying Mike - we hear stories on both sides of the fence and its hard to make a judgement sometimes.

I guess its a bit like car reports we read about - no matter how good a model is somewhere some time one will blow up and it really is hard to put it all in context and draw the right conclusions.

I like to pick the good side until proven otherwise and I think its worth the odd bruise.
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Follow Up By: mike g2 - Saturday, Mar 23, 2013 at 11:17

Saturday, Mar 23, 2013 at 11:17
sorry all-misquoted the story(book) on desperate farmers- im pretty sure it was 'grapes of wrath' .
out of some amazing co-incidence, farmers in WA wheatbelt currently looking for some temporary help with getting by until better times...current poor outlook,high aus $ effecting crop sale price, rising costs, bad seasons etc..
When they ask for help you know its needed.
MG.
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Reply By: Penchy - Friday, Mar 22, 2013 at 17:47

Friday, Mar 22, 2013 at 17:47
sounds to me like you did all that was needed. He needed a lift and you gave him one. If your the charitable type who goes beyond what is required then you be doing things for other people all the time, but I'm sure he is happy with what he got.
I picked up my first hitch hiker and drove her 50 odd k's to her aboriginal community at Galahgumbone (spelling may be wrong) a few months back. She had spent the night in hospital for trying to top herself by drinking her self to death. She checked herself out and was going to walk the 50k. She was harmless, kept nodding off and so on. My only concern was that she pass out and have a bladder or bowel misfunction on my seat that I would have to clean. All was good though, I dropped her at her house and we said goodbye.
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Follow Up By: Robin Miller - Friday, Mar 22, 2013 at 21:46

Friday, Mar 22, 2013 at 21:46
It does make you wonder how some people get themselves in those states doesn't it Penchy.

Glad you story had a happy ending as not all do.
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Reply By: Rockape - Friday, Mar 22, 2013 at 19:19

Friday, Mar 22, 2013 at 19:19
Robin,
I do and I don't if you know what I mean. I make a decision pretty quickly whether to or not on a gut feeling. Maybe that is stupid and maybe I am.

This happened in the 70's rattling back to Weipa from Mapoon. You just don't expect hitchhikers in that country. Came across a long head blond leaping nome with his finger out. I actually knew him by the name of Marijuana Jeff. I knew he had been Barra fishing with German Jack Keil but on the the journey back to Weipa I couldn't make head nor tail as to why he was wandering around up there. I don't think he knew either.

If you want a good story google German Jack Keil. He was something else and I often remember him getting pissed, playing his guitar and starting some bloody in depth argument about politics until he got knocked A over T.
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Follow Up By: Robin Miller - Friday, Mar 22, 2013 at 21:52

Friday, Mar 22, 2013 at 21:52
After a few questions and a look over I think like you that you can develop a reasonable gut feeling Rockape.
We often have to make judgements short on hard information but really humans are designed to do that and by and large it does work and we use that process to assit us next time we have to make one so I'm with you on that.

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Reply By: Member - VickiW - Friday, Mar 22, 2013 at 21:45

Friday, Mar 22, 2013 at 21:45
Hi Robin,

whatever the truth of the situation it sounds like he needed help & you helped him. Nothing bad about that, his situation sounds unhappy whatever the truth.
I don't pick up hitch hikers just because of my situation, but I have to recount an unusual story. We (the ex & me) had only just set up camp at a small campsite beside the GRR, no one esle there. A guy walks into camp, no vehicle in site. He says he's been walking for 20ks & asks for water which of course we help him with. He says he left his grandmother in the car 20k back and was walking to the next roadhouse to get help.. we hadn't seen a stuck car, or him walking along the GRR to the campsite. it was about this time I noticed the machete tucked into his belt. My ex asked if he needed a lift to the roadhouse, which I remember was probably another 20k away. He said no he was fine, he'd spoken to his Dad who was apparently driving towards them from I can;t remember how far away. He thanks us politely, waves & continues his walk.

Afterwards my ex said he'd only seen the machete only part way through the conversation & had also been nervous ... remains to this day one of the oddest & most disturbing experiences on a trip (for me). Similarly it left me always wondering about the truth.

Cheers,
Vicki
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Follow Up By: Robin Miller - Friday, Mar 22, 2013 at 22:03

Friday, Mar 22, 2013 at 22:03
I have some empthay with what you are saying Vicki.

I try and design everything with a backup plan and redundancy in mind - partly because as a design engineer on many consumer goods you are often the target when something goes wrong and so wether its designing a new TV , a piece of public infrastructure , or a difficult 4wd trip I always go thru the process of asking myself whatif and what is the backup plan.

Once I had to walk 10km thru the bush to camp leaving a vehicle behind and all I took was a Machete.
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Follow Up By: Member - VickiW - Friday, Mar 22, 2013 at 22:12

Friday, Mar 22, 2013 at 22:12
Robin - so you didn't happen to be on the GRR about 6ish years ago?
:)
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Follow Up By: Member - Warrie (NSW) - Saturday, Mar 23, 2013 at 11:53

Saturday, Mar 23, 2013 at 11:53
Robin, you win the prize for the most out of date video date - January 1st 1970 indeed. And besides Oz still used mph back then.. W
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Follow Up By: Robin Miller - Saturday, Mar 23, 2013 at 12:51

Saturday, Mar 23, 2013 at 12:51
Your on the ball Warrie, I was wondering if anyone would notice that the recorder clock backup batery is stuffed.
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Reply By: Gaynor - Sunday, Mar 24, 2013 at 06:00

Sunday, Mar 24, 2013 at 06:00
I have been hitch hiking around Australia extensively for the past 4 years. It is the only way I can afford to get around and see all the places I want to see. I have only been met with kindness and concern for my well being, well except for three minor situations that did not escalate.

One time I climbed into a double-cab (Ute with bin, seats in back and front) There were three people in the vehicle. The woman driver, was covered in blood, the man in the back seat had a terribly scared face and the man in the passenger seat had a rifle between him and the door. I burst out laughing the situation was so bizarre. Turns out the woman was the owner of Barn Hill, a lovely rustic campsite south of Broome and they had just been to a killer (shot a cow and cut it up, putting it in coolers in the back of the Ute). After such a strange introduction to Barn Hill, I went on to have such a good time and ended up camping there for 6 weeks.

Most of the time I found it really easy to get a lift, but there were a couple of occasions that really surprised me - between Derby and Fitzroy Crossing and Winjana Gorge and Fitzroy Crossing. I was in the middle of nowhere and cars simply did not stop. I eventually got a lift, but the one occasion was because and ex-Mauri military man going in the wrong direction with a fuel tanker stopped and refused to leave me there as the sun had set and it was getting dark. When he stepped out into the road and told people to stop, they did! He was a powerfully built man and very commanding. He put me into a car with a lady and satisfied I was now safe, continued on his way. I was and am, eternally grateful for his chivalry. Who knows, perhaps without his intervention, the day may have ended badly.
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Follow Up By: Robin Miller - Sunday, Mar 24, 2013 at 08:13

Sunday, Mar 24, 2013 at 08:13
Hi Gaynor
Sounds like Barn hill was a great experience for you.

I think we can sometimes forget that there are other valid ways to get out and explore the place - I must admit that for last few years its been the multi-thousand dollar long distance dash to an objective for me but I'm working on changing this, though I don't think I'd have it in me to do your 4 year of hitch hiking.

I imagine there are a whole bunch little things and approaches to issues that you have learnt.
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Follow Up By: Gaynor - Sunday, Mar 24, 2013 at 14:42

Sunday, Mar 24, 2013 at 14:42
I come from a violent continent so I am not unaware of the dangers, but I refuse to view all people with suspicion. Nor do I make the mistake of believing an unassuming, benign looking person is incapable of atrocities. I have walked amongst six year old children who have murdered in order to survive.

Hitch hiking is not for everyone. If you have victim written all over you, there is a strong possibility that you will attract the type of person who is looking for just such a candidate. Showing no fear, no matter how frightened I may be inside, is something I try to do, so far with success.

Being aware and always keeping my eye on the driver and never turning my back is very important. Does that mean I contradict myself? Perhaps, but I think it sends a signal to any person sizing me up to do me harm, reason to think twice.

I would not do what I do in Australia, in just any country. Australians value life and in general, treat one another accordingly. There are exceptions, but the important fact is, that harming another human being is not the norm. I appreciate that sentiment.
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FollowupID: 784759

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