Fitting Spare Tyres

Submitted: Friday, Apr 26, 2013 at 09:43
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I read somewhere that, in addition to carrying 2 spare wheels on an outback trek, one ought to also carry spare tyres.

How feasible is it to swap over a tyre on the road and what equipment would one need?

Peter
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Reply By: Member - Duncan W (WA) - Friday, Apr 26, 2013 at 10:08

Friday, Apr 26, 2013 at 10:08
Firstly I'd get off the road as you might get run over. Sorry couldn't resist.

Seriouslythough it's not that hard. I use the R & R Bead breakers as they are good to use with alloy rims. A lot more gentle and less hard work than the plyer type in my mind.

Practice at home before you leave. The R & R's come with an instructional DVD. I set up my lap top in the garage at home and watched and practiced.

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Reply By: Hairy (NT) - Friday, Apr 26, 2013 at 10:08

Friday, Apr 26, 2013 at 10:08
Gday,
Bead breaker, tyre levers, rubber mallet.........but if you dont know what tools are needed youve obviously never changed a tyre before?
I reckon should should try to change a tyre before you buy the gear and decide weather its feasible or not.

Cheers
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Reply By: Member - J&R - Friday, Apr 26, 2013 at 10:46

Friday, Apr 26, 2013 at 10:46
And a spare motor, gearbox, transfer case, front and rear diffs.....you get the idea.

Unless you're going to be charging along rough roads at great speed and ploughing through flooded rivers then 2 good spares will be quite enough.

So many people spend all their money on outfitting their vehicles with gear they probably will never use to the detriment of the trip and the vehicle. You can safely drive most of Australia in a standard 4wd.
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Follow Up By: Member - Royce - Sunday, Apr 28, 2013 at 23:11

Sunday, Apr 28, 2013 at 23:11
or two wheel drive for that matter.
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Reply By: Member - John and Val - Friday, Apr 26, 2013 at 11:03

Friday, Apr 26, 2013 at 11:03
Peter,

Depends where you're going, but unless you really expect to be damaging tyres frequently, and beyond what can be fixed with a plug, I'd suggest carrying two spare wheels is as much as you will need. Assuming tubeless tyres (not split rims) an essential is a decent repair kit for plugging leaks. We've travelled a lot of remote tracks - the deserts, CSR,..... but never carried more than the two spare wheels. The big advantage of carrying a spare tyre is that it's lighter than carrying a spare wheel. If you do carry a tyre, be sure to wrap it (shrinkwrap) to keep sand and dirt out; much easier to keep it out than it is to get it out by the side of the track.

"How feasible is it to swap over a tyre on the road and what equipment would one need?" Not impossible but you'll need to carry the gear already suggested and become familiar with using it. A plastic tarp to work on is also a high priority so you don't get everything covered in sand and dirt.

The above assumes tubeless tyres. If you are running split rims, a whole new scenario, different tools, and absolutely essential that you learn of the associated dangers.

Cheers

John
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Follow Up By: Member - John and Val - Friday, Apr 26, 2013 at 12:00

Friday, Apr 26, 2013 at 12:00
Forgot something important - I you're going far off the bitumen you need to be able to drop tyre pressure and reinflate. That means a decent compressor and a reliable tyre pressure gauge. Much more important than an extra tyre or two.

Cheers

John
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Follow Up By: Member - John - Sunday, Apr 28, 2013 at 08:26

Sunday, Apr 28, 2013 at 08:26
John, rather than wrap in gladwrap, I inflate the spare tube inside the spare tyre, keeps everythng nice and clean. Cheers.
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Follow Up By: Member - John and Val - Sunday, Apr 28, 2013 at 08:42

Sunday, Apr 28, 2013 at 08:42
Yes John, a good way to go, especially since it's wise to carry a tube anyway. I've seen both the inflated tube and the shrink wrap used, though we carry two wheels ready to go for a quick swapover if a plug won't solve the immediate problem. Much prefer to work on tyres in the cool of the evening rather than by the side of the track in the heat, flies and blowing sand.

Cheers

John
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Follow Up By: Member - John - Sunday, Apr 28, 2013 at 08:46

Sunday, Apr 28, 2013 at 08:46
Agree with you on that..................
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Reply By: Ross M - Friday, Apr 26, 2013 at 11:07

Friday, Apr 26, 2013 at 11:07
Pelican
Carrying 1 or 2 spare tyres is lighter than 1 or two whole wheels.
You can use the space in the big hole to store items for he trip, saves weight.

However, if you have difficulty in changing a tyre on a rim or removing one or puncture ( often called puncher) repairs then you may have to carry whole wheels.
Remember, you only have to change a tyre IF and only IF you have tyre trouble.
It is character building so think of that while you complete the job.

It appears some learning of tyre changing skills is required before you can confidently venture away.

Ross M
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Follow Up By: Member - David M (SA) - Friday, Apr 26, 2013 at 15:11

Friday, Apr 26, 2013 at 15:11
"It is character building so think of that while you complete the job"

Staked one (again) on the front of the 100 series.IFS. I was definitely a different character by the time I had finished. :)
I am now riding on 693,694, and 697s. with a Goodyear on the roof.
Cheers,Dave.
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Reply By: olcoolone - Friday, Apr 26, 2013 at 11:41

Friday, Apr 26, 2013 at 11:41
If using good tyres in good condition carrying one spare should do, get yourself a TPMS and a good quality tyre plug kit and plug as you go.

My way of looking at it is the more you have to do the more chance of damage or injury and yes I have seen someone get hit with a tyre lever requiring stitches... could've been worse.

The other big thing is drive to the conditions and pay attention to your surroundings, this alone will help you save tyres.

People get carried away with what they think they have to carry...... spare CV's, Shockers, Springs, brake pads, water pump, oil for engine/diff/gearbox/power steering, 2000pcs tool kit.......I am positive some carry more than the local Repco store.
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Follow Up By: Member - J&R - Friday, Apr 26, 2013 at 14:37

Friday, Apr 26, 2013 at 14:37
olcoolone,
Couldn't agree more.
Many carry equipment they may use once in a lifetime. Or never for most. Does nothing but increase weight, reduce reliability and put money into pockets that could be better spent on the trip itself.

There was a thread recently requesting advice on what was required to do a trip around Aus in a 4wd. The list of additions suggested was obscene. Lifts, winch, spares, racks, monitors, fuel storage, water storage, radios, extra lights, extra batteries blah blah blah. Get a life. You can do the trip on a pushbike. A standard car will get you almost everywhere. And if you get stuck, there is always someone who would love to use $2000 worth of rescue gear they fitted 4 years ago and has gathered dust ever since. Gotta love marketing.

But I digress....

The suggestion to carry just the tyre and not a complete wheel assembly to save on weight......go figure. By the time you add the extras to fit a tyre on a rim, bang goes the weight saving.
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Friday, Apr 26, 2013 at 15:57

Friday, Apr 26, 2013 at 15:57
J&R,
I'm not going to go out and weigh them to validate the point, but I'm pretty sure that my pair of tyre levers weigh a lot less than a pair of rims. Furthermore, they give me the option to repair more than two tyres should that be needed.
And yes, they have been used!
Cheers
Allan

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Follow Up By: Member - J&R - Friday, Apr 26, 2013 at 16:36

Friday, Apr 26, 2013 at 16:36
So if you punch a rock and it damages the rim beyond use?
What good will 2 tyres, tubes, levers, pump and rubber mallet do you then?
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Friday, Apr 26, 2013 at 17:21

Friday, Apr 26, 2013 at 17:21
In truth J&R, I carry one mounted tyre and sometimes one unmounted.
But we were talking about weight, not rim redundancy. You are trying to deflect the argument with inconsequences. One tube and levers still weigh less than a rim. I don't use a mallet and I still need a compressor for tyre pressure adjustment anyway.
If you do "get stuck" and I come along with my you-beaut tyre levers, be sure to remind me that I "love to use my rescue gear". I may forget.
Cheers
Allan

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Follow Up By: Member - lyndon NT - Wednesday, May 08, 2013 at 17:49

Wednesday, May 08, 2013 at 17:49
"So if you punch a rock and it damages the rim beyond use?
What good will 2 tyres, tubes, levers, pump and rubber mallet do you then?"
Umm, with the new "yuppy"rims probably not much.
But then I use splits and have had the unfortunate event of cruising down the road at high speed with no tyre after the side wall fell out.
The rim, just fine. If it did dent a bit you can just bash it back out and it will still be fine (on the rear at least :-) )
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Reply By: Olsen's 4WD Tours and Training - Friday, Apr 26, 2013 at 14:18

Friday, Apr 26, 2013 at 14:18
Very feasible and an essential skill for remote travellers. I fit several each year in the bush with mallet and levers. It is not something you want to try without training and practice, there are a few "tricks" to making it easy. I run courses for remote travellers all the time covering this very task and the skills required. My brother in law ran a tyre business for years and insisted all his tyre fitters could do it - in case of power outage- they could still fit tyres.
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Reply By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Friday, Apr 26, 2013 at 14:21

Friday, Apr 26, 2013 at 14:21
Peter,


You seem to be asking if carrying spare tyres *in addition* to spare wheels with fitted tyres is appropriate. I would consider either but not both. If travelling remotely and in arduous conditions then two spares is appropriate.


Carrying spare wheels with fitted tyres is more convenient but if weight is a factor then carrying spare tyres only may be better. Refitting a wheel with a new tyre is not the easiest task and you would need instruction plus practise to do it properly and safely.


As John has said, if carrying a tyre carcase outside the cabin it is wise to cover it to preclude foreign material from lodging inside the carcase. Other than wrapping the tyre, another neat trick is to fit a tube inside the carcase and inflate it sufficiently to fill & seal the cavity. This has an advantage that the tube can also be used to repair a punctured tyre which cannot be sealed airtight. Just be sure that the tube has a valve stem which suits your wheels.
Cheers
Allan

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Follow Up By: Member - John - Sunday, Apr 28, 2013 at 08:30

Sunday, Apr 28, 2013 at 08:30
Sorry, didn't see your reply re tube in spare tyre, didn't need to reply to Members John and Val.
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Sunday, Apr 28, 2013 at 08:40

Sunday, Apr 28, 2013 at 08:40
That's alright John, you just added to my suggestion. I pinched it off someone else a while back.
Cheers
Allan

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Reply By: passionfruit - Friday, Apr 26, 2013 at 16:24

Friday, Apr 26, 2013 at 16:24
I carry two whole spare wheels which I thought was overkill until I had two flats at the one time. It was hot and in the middle of the day so I was glad to be on my way(out of the sun) in about 20 mins.Glenn
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Reply By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Friday, Apr 26, 2013 at 16:41

Friday, Apr 26, 2013 at 16:41
If you are already carrying 2 mounted spares, the only extra item needed is a plug kit and learn how to use it. If you know how to use a plug kit, then you probably won't use either of the spares and you won't even need to use the jack because you can plug a tyre without removing it.

Speaking of the jack, it makes a damn good beadbreaker - My high lift jack and my factory axle jack are the only beadbreakers I've used over the past 12 years. I do carry tyre levers (Mumme brand) for the odd occasion where we're not successful with a plug repair and need to pop on a patch from the inside.
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Reply By: cookie1 - Friday, Apr 26, 2013 at 16:53

Friday, Apr 26, 2013 at 16:53
I carry the typical spare wheel that is new condition, I carried a spare tyre once on the roof, across the Simpson then Cape York and so on and so on, and didn't use either fortunately.

I now only carry the 1 spare, TyrePliers, & various Tip Top Rema patches & plugs, I have used the big gator patch on a Kumho (I will not digress on how bad the tyres were) and used it up until the time I sold the car.

I have information that the constabulary are going to start targetting 4wds that are over weight by pulling them into weigh stations so think about your weight if carrying 2 spares wheels and a spare tyre.

This is only my opinion based on quite a few thousand km of off roading but others have much more experience than I.

Cheers
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Reply By: Pelikan - Saturday, Apr 27, 2013 at 18:12

Saturday, Apr 27, 2013 at 18:12
My sincere thanks to all who replied to my question. Once again this forum has proved its value to a beginner like me.
As expected there is a variety of views, but something to be learnt from all of them. Being perhaps at the upper end of the age bracket of those indulging in this pastime I have decided on the basis of your advice to go down the path of having the two spares and the plug kit. I lean towards the view of those who think one can go overboard with all the gear that can be carried. We are perhaps not going to be as adventurous as some and hopefully will not get into too many really difficult situations. Seeking member's advice on this and a variety of other topics like tyre pressures, communications, safe speeds for different surfaces etc should help us avoid too many problem situations.

Cheers, Peter
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