1st attempt with GoPro Hero3 Black Edition

Submitted: Thursday, May 02, 2013 at 11:16
ThreadID: 101976 Views:2576 Replies:6 FollowUps:7
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I mounted my GoPro on the roof of the caravan on a drive through the Barossa Valley and Adelaide Hills to try out the time laps function. Unfortunately, the weather was very overcast so the colours aren't great. For anyone who is interested, the settings were: 1x frame per 5 seconds, 7MP (wide). Editing was done using GoPro's free CineForm Studio with slight colour correction. I also used the zoom and vertical frame functions to minimise the amount of roof in the picture. I controlled it using the WiFi remote that came with the camera but I should have used the iPhone App as it would have allowed me to frame the shots better using its preview function.



I purchased the camera mainly for time-lapse photography - lightening and storm fronts. Also intend using it when I get off road.

Cheers

Skull
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Reply By: member - mazcan - Thursday, May 02, 2013 at 11:45

Thursday, May 02, 2013 at 11:45
hi skulldug
i'm puzzled when I played the video its running at hi speed and almost impossible to see the pictures although the clarity seemed ok
can't you slow it down
never seen a video at this speed in general viewing on here before ???????????????????? you must have some on the replay in the wrong position ??????
cheers
AnswerID: 510188

Follow Up By: Skulldug - Thursday, May 02, 2013 at 11:53

Thursday, May 02, 2013 at 11:53
Hi Mazcan,

Its actually not video footage which would normally be shot at something like 48 frames per second. It is a series of time lapse photographs taken at 5 second intervals. Normally, the camera would be stationary and the subject (say a sunrise) would moving. There have been some spectacular landscapes posted here, which with a bit of practice I hope to do.

Hope this makes sense.

Skull
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FollowupID: 788250

Reply By: Lyn W3 - Thursday, May 02, 2013 at 12:13

Thursday, May 02, 2013 at 12:13
Need someone sitting up there wiping the water drops off.

Interesting though.
AnswerID: 510189

Reply By: garrycol - Thursday, May 02, 2013 at 12:38

Thursday, May 02, 2013 at 12:38
Like many of these cameras the vision is a bit 'fish-eye' and shows vertical items like poles and trees to be curve - given the price and quality of your camera is there a setting that will take this out and provide video/stills that are not 'fish eye' like ie - the verticals are vertical not curved.

Nice quality otherwise though.

Cheers

Garry
AnswerID: 510190

Follow Up By: Barbera72 - Thursday, May 02, 2013 at 13:10

Thursday, May 02, 2013 at 13:10
You can choose from wide and narrow view with either video or stills, the later avoids distortion in the corners but has obviously a limited field for this sort of drivelapse.
Also, the closer the stills are taken (1 or 2 seconds apart for example) and smoother the outcome of the video.
This is an example of 1 frame per second:
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FollowupID: 788254

Reply By: member-PradoMad - Friday, May 03, 2013 at 07:25

Friday, May 03, 2013 at 07:25
I have just been given the Hero3 black edition. Can't wait to use it.
I'm a bit confused though how to focus on anything as there is no viewfinder.

I also used the zoom and vertical frame functions to minimise the amount of roof in the picture....?
Skull; how do you know whats in the frame?
JS.
AnswerID: 510226

Follow Up By: Lazybugger - Friday, May 03, 2013 at 08:09

Friday, May 03, 2013 at 08:09
Hi,

I've got the black gopro as well and I use it for kayak fishing. Of course haven't caught a decent bloody fish while its been on yet.

Action cameras are usually set up in fixed positions or attached to the body. The lack of a viewfinder is a trade off to having them small. You can get an Lcd back for around the $100 mark but it will drain the battery fast. Best off to use the gopro app and confirm your shot is ok from a fixed position. There are links to the app on the gopro website.
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FollowupID: 788299

Follow Up By: Skulldug - Friday, May 03, 2013 at 08:28

Friday, May 03, 2013 at 08:28
PradoMad,

These cameras are a bit different from your home video camera. They are action cams designed for extreme sports. The default setting for video is wide angle which is what gives you the fish eye effect. All you have to do is point it in the general direction of your subject and, chances are, they will be in the shot. So, it is possible to strap the camera onto your head or car etc and be relatively sure it will capture what's ahead of you. Once you have the footage on your computer, it is easy to crop the parts you don't want. It is just like cropping a still photo but it applies it to the whole video clip.

There are view finder add ons you can buy to make it more like a normal video camera but the cheapest is the iPhone app which gives a preview screen see what's in the frame (assuming you have a smartphone).

If you want to shoot holiday snaps, I'd stick to a conventional video camera. The GoPro is really only if you want to do strange things, like mount it under your car or on your mountain bike.

They have a cult following among the young ones for capturing extreme acts of stupidity. They also seem to be increasingly popular among the greying for things like sunsets.

They also have an extensive menus system so it can be set like a normal camera but it is not intuitive and the lense is fixed (no ability or need to focus).

Hope this helps.

Skull

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FollowupID: 788301

Follow Up By: member-PradoMad - Friday, May 03, 2013 at 08:34

Friday, May 03, 2013 at 08:34
Thank Scull; most informative.
JS.
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FollowupID: 788302

Follow Up By: member-PradoMad - Friday, May 03, 2013 at 08:35

Friday, May 03, 2013 at 08:35
Sorry; I meant to say Skull.
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FollowupID: 788303

Reply By: craigandej - Saturday, Jun 01, 2013 at 20:39

Saturday, Jun 01, 2013 at 20:39
What would the longest time lapse settings be? And how long would the biggest memory card allow it to run for?

Im interested in recording a trip to Cape York, but don't want to have to stop every couple of hours to replace memory card.

Thanks
AnswerID: 512341

Follow Up By: Barbera72 - Sunday, Jun 02, 2013 at 08:02

Sunday, Jun 02, 2013 at 08:02
Set the images at the lowest resolution and take the frames as far apart possible but not too much. Taking the shots 5 or more seconds apart makes the final timelapse confusing and unwatchable. Remember that the battery will run-out before the memory card is full, unless you plug the camera via USB cable to the cig lighter socket.
To show you an example, this clip was made over a distance of 200 Km and was driven in 2 hrs exactly (enough for battery and sd card to do the job). The frames were taken 5 seconds apart, this is the result:

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FollowupID: 790688

Reply By: craigandej - Sunday, Jun 02, 2013 at 12:51

Sunday, Jun 02, 2013 at 12:51
Thanks for the reply. Did you record that trip? Know those roads well, I live at Mcleans Ridges :)
AnswerID: 512374

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