beadbreakers

Submitted: Wednesday, Apr 24, 2002 at 00:00
ThreadID: 1020 Views:1910 Replies:5 FollowUps:0
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can anyone suggest what can be used as a bead breaker on split rims apart from gear such as tyrepliers,tyre jaws etc as i consider these to be too expensive for what they are.
cheers
donalddasher
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Reply By: John R. - Wednesday, Apr 24, 2002 at 00:00

Wednesday, Apr 24, 2002 at 00:00
Your question was answered on the Overland forum a few minutes ago....
AnswerID: 3082

Reply By: Andrew Donald - Wednesday, Apr 24, 2002 at 00:00

Wednesday, Apr 24, 2002 at 00:00
anything that can apply some pressure to the tyre while its laying on the ground. Jack base while exerting opposing pressure from the vehicle. Actually run over the tyre with one of the vehicles wheels (gently - with a helper\directer). I have tyre pliers and they work great, you should try some if you get the oppurtunity. I've heard it said that you can't have enough tyre repair gear when in the outback.
AnswerID: 3084

Reply By: ExplorOz Team - David - Thursday, Apr 25, 2002 at 00:00

Thursday, Apr 25, 2002 at 00:00
Donald,For years I used a good set of tyre levers and nothing else for the split rims on our initial Troop carrier. There are a lot of products around but these such as TyrePliers etc are really good for tubeless tyres. I found (after many many many changes) that a good set of levers was all that I needed. Coupled with a couple of good tubes and a quality patch repair kit you are set and ready for anything.Enjoy David
AnswerID: 3094

Reply By: Tony- Thursday, Apr 25, 2002 at 00:00

Thursday, Apr 25, 2002 at 00:00
Donald, I have split rims and I carry a largish hammer (doubles as the tent peg whacker), two good quality tyre levers (20 inch) and a thing like a large chisel. This is used, with the hammer of course, to force the tyre loose from the split rim side. I don't know the technical term for this chisel but tyre shops use them nowdays mainly for truck tyres. The edge is not sharp - rounded - to prevent tyre bead damage. I made mine from a 30cm long bar of 1 1/2 inch steel rod. Heat one end and flatten it on an anvil to give it a chisel shape. I hope that descibes it better. These could be purchased also. Cheap and very effetive on those tyres that haven't been off a split rim for some time. Could possible be harder work on non split rim wheels.
AnswerID: 3099

Reply By: Gordon - Friday, Apr 26, 2002 at 00:00

Friday, Apr 26, 2002 at 00:00
DD, my b-in-Law uses a slide hammer with "chisel style" end similar to earlier reply. His is quite big and heavy (1.2M long) and would do a large truck wheel if necessary but you won't need one that big. You could make one easily using a length of 40 or 50mm pipe and chisel ended crowbar. Bend the chisel end so that the part that contacts the tyre is blunt.
AnswerID: 3135

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