How Rust is no longer a big talking point in the modern vehicles.

Submitted: Saturday, May 04, 2013 at 19:02
ThreadID: 102017 Views:2217 Replies:9 FollowUps:17
This Thread has been Archived
Remember the ol days with no money, buckets of bog, chicken wire, and god knows what else at rego time,...Some of the early Holdens especially the utes where shockers with rust, many a time you could see the white line flashing by when you looked down,...lol...great old workers! but glad there gone.


Cheers Axle.
Back Expand Un-Read 0 Moderator

Reply By: Michael ( Moss Vale NSW) - Saturday, May 04, 2013 at 19:12

Saturday, May 04, 2013 at 19:12
Axle! I think anti corrosion technology is better and design with drains in panels are better! A natural progression I guess! I remember those days! Michael
Patrol 4.2TDi 2003

Retired 2016 and now Out and About!

There's time to rest when you're dead,
Get out and do something instead!

Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

AnswerID: 510316

Follow Up By: allein m - Saturday, May 04, 2013 at 19:33

Saturday, May 04, 2013 at 19:33
I worked for a company called cloughs construction in perth they had some 12 month construction job up in shark bay salt company you should have seen the brand new HQ utes that returned from that job after 12 months driving on salt pans huge holes in the floor pans they did try to put some tar and preventitive methode before sending them there but the salt did a number on them not sure how they got rid of the utes wrecker was the only option to my mind but they may have auctioned them off to some poor sucker cheap.
0
FollowupID: 788410

Follow Up By: IronMan - Saturday, May 04, 2013 at 19:48

Saturday, May 04, 2013 at 19:48
Many cars are now made with coated steel and, as Michael said, paint technology has much improved since the "bad old days". Also, sealants are much improved and are applied only where needed - anyone else remember the mountains of goop under the guards on XA-B-C Falcons? Another one is that modern houses have garages whilst in the 1970's they were far fewer and far between.
0
FollowupID: 788412

Reply By: Michael ( Moss Vale NSW) - Saturday, May 04, 2013 at 19:47

Saturday, May 04, 2013 at 19:47
Yep! Salt is a problem of its own! Michael
Patrol 4.2TDi 2003

Retired 2016 and now Out and About!

There's time to rest when you're dead,
Get out and do something instead!

Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

AnswerID: 510320

Follow Up By: Candace S. - Sunday, May 05, 2013 at 03:22

Sunday, May 05, 2013 at 03:22
Indeed...and if you live in a part of the world where salt is regularly applied to the roads in wintertime, you really appreciate the improved designs and materials that have made vehicle rust practically a thing of the past! ;)
0
FollowupID: 788423

Reply By: Mark S (cns) - Saturday, May 04, 2013 at 20:10

Saturday, May 04, 2013 at 20:10
Yep, but it is still a hot topic if you buy a new vehicle.
The amount of people that get suckered into a "protection package" that includes rust proofing a brand new vehicle!
Every dealer will offer this conjob. I had this 2 years ago and I just said if it needs rust proofing, then you expect it to rust, so maybe I should get another brand.....
My last 2 vehicles were 13 & 11 years old when I turned them over. Good maintenance = no rust

Cheers
AnswerID: 510323

Reply By: Rockape - Saturday, May 04, 2013 at 20:18

Saturday, May 04, 2013 at 20:18
Axle,
I remember having a mk2 zephyr ute that the seat was held up with a couple of peices of 3/2 hardwood because there as no floor left.

I don't miss those vehicles one bit. 1929 coventry eagle, Bsa Bantam, Trumpy Tiger, Trumpy Bonneville, Honda 4, Honda 175, Honda 250, FJ, FC, Zcar, FE, 2xHR, 2 x austin freeways,2 x fergie tractors, yanmar tractor, EH, VC dunny, XC And XB, HK Monaro 327, Landrovers x 3 (sad time in my life), J model Bedford, International Transtar 4200, 2x troopcarriers. Mighty Hyundai excel 2 door sports ( very ucking fast) Hundai I30, Now a Ranger.

Now I can't remember which one rusted the worst.

In a quiet day in this country you can here my old vehicles rusting.

AnswerID: 510324

Follow Up By: Member - ken m4 - Sunday, May 05, 2013 at 08:23

Sunday, May 05, 2013 at 08:23
Had my share of vehicles over the years but cant get close to that lot
0
FollowupID: 788430

Follow Up By: Axle - Sunday, May 05, 2013 at 10:00

Sunday, May 05, 2013 at 10:00
Hmmm, Bit of a licqorish allsorts there RA,..C'm on the landrovers weren't that bad......LOL. Which yr model triumphs,had a few myself

great bikes in there day.

Cheers Axle.
0
FollowupID: 788449

Follow Up By: Rockape - Sunday, May 05, 2013 at 18:02

Sunday, May 05, 2013 at 18:02
Axle,
The Tiger was a 1962 and the Bonny a 1964 one the first of the unit construction Trumpy's. I think the new postie bikes have more power these days. LOL.

KeDi. People used to say. Look here comes tractor and junk.
0
FollowupID: 788480

Follow Up By: Rockape - Sunday, May 05, 2013 at 19:17

Sunday, May 05, 2013 at 19:17
Axle,
here is one of your fellow excavator operators today trying to separate boy and girl mud buggies, well I hope it was boy and girl not boy and boy.

0
FollowupID: 788484

Follow Up By: Axle - Monday, May 06, 2013 at 08:14

Monday, May 06, 2013 at 08:14
Lol What a mess RA!!,... If it was me there, the excavator would be buried as well, ha ha.
0
FollowupID: 788503

Follow Up By: Rockape - Monday, May 06, 2013 at 08:26

Monday, May 06, 2013 at 08:26
Axle,
will post some pics of the trials in a new thread.
0
FollowupID: 788504

Reply By: Member - Wamuranman - Saturday, May 04, 2013 at 20:38

Saturday, May 04, 2013 at 20:38
I don't think there was any vehicle as bad as the early Nissans for rust.... you could see the rust eating away while you looked at it...LOL. Here is my 1976 model...engine and gearbox still strong but the body is all but gone.







AnswerID: 510326

Follow Up By: Michael ( Moss Vale NSW) - Saturday, May 04, 2013 at 20:43

Saturday, May 04, 2013 at 20:43
That will buff up i'm sure!! :)) Michael
Patrol 4.2TDi 2003

Retired 2016 and now Out and About!

There's time to rest when you're dead,
Get out and do something instead!

Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 788413

Follow Up By: Echucan Bob - Sunday, May 05, 2013 at 08:44

Sunday, May 05, 2013 at 08:44
Is that a roll cage or scaffolding?
0
FollowupID: 788436

Follow Up By: Member - Wamuranman - Sunday, May 05, 2013 at 08:54

Sunday, May 05, 2013 at 08:54
Scaffolding Bob

0
FollowupID: 788438

Follow Up By: Axle - Sunday, May 05, 2013 at 10:02

Sunday, May 05, 2013 at 10:02
Kitten number two will fix it!.
0
FollowupID: 788450

Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Sunday, May 05, 2013 at 12:18

Sunday, May 05, 2013 at 12:18
Nah, think it will need at least Number Three.
Cheers
Allan

Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 788467

Follow Up By: Michael ( Moss Vale NSW) - Sunday, May 05, 2013 at 19:54

Sunday, May 05, 2013 at 19:54
Is that a crank handle hole in the front of that Nissan?? It seems all the practical and functional featured have long gone! What about flipper windows!! They were great, you could actually get some fresh air!! Michael
Patrol 4.2TDi 2003

Retired 2016 and now Out and About!

There's time to rest when you're dead,
Get out and do something instead!

Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 788487

Follow Up By: Member - Wamuranman - Sunday, May 05, 2013 at 20:12

Sunday, May 05, 2013 at 20:12
Yes they can be cranked. Its the simplicity of these older vehicles that keep them going...37 years later. I doubt that will be the case 3 or 4 decades from now with the current model vehicles and all their electronic gadgetry.

1
FollowupID: 788488

Reply By: The Bantam - Saturday, May 04, 2013 at 22:35

Saturday, May 04, 2013 at 22:35
I think there are two things in play...yes definite improvements in body design, painting methods and materials....probably more the painting materials.

But we also tend to run our vehicles for less years these days.

People generally turn their cars over sooner and the used cars are generally younger and cheaper.

he other thing is its just not worth the dealers fiddling with dodgy cars any more.

If ya try to trade a car with rust in it these days...the respons is more like.."try the wreckers"

Even the many of wreckers aren't interested in it if its over 10 years old and rusty.

Some of these older cars seem to be worth more in scrap value than for stripping.

cheers
AnswerID: 510334

Reply By: 08crd - Sunday, May 05, 2013 at 00:11

Sunday, May 05, 2013 at 00:11
On a still day with no wind you could hear 55 and 60 series Landcruisers rusting.lol

Like they say metal coatings are much better nowadays, most car companies give a warranty against rust thse days.
AnswerID: 510341

Reply By: Echucan Bob - Sunday, May 05, 2013 at 09:03

Sunday, May 05, 2013 at 09:03
Axle

As well as better quality steel, better surface treatments and paints, I reckon construction techniques have improved so that water pooling and trapping is less likely.

My first car in 1970 was an Austin Lancer (given to me by my grandmother when she became to dangerous to allow behind the wheel). The car was a dog, but the best feature were the Fred Fintstone floors - you could put your legs through the rust holes and run when the drive train otherwise failed.

When I became more affluent I had a series of Lancias. Italian steel made British steel look like 316 stainless.

Since the mid 80s when I ditched the Lancias there have been five BMWs, a Lexus, an Audi, two VWs, two MX5s, two Pajeros, two Land Rovers and two Porsches. And not a gram of Fe2O3 between them.
AnswerID: 510348

Follow Up By: Keir & Marg - Sunday, May 05, 2013 at 13:05

Sunday, May 05, 2013 at 13:05
Had a Lancia once, closely followed by a Fiat. The best thing about Italian autos is that their power-to-weight ratio improved as they got older!!
0
FollowupID: 788469

Reply By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Sunday, May 05, 2013 at 09:15

Sunday, May 05, 2013 at 09:15
We used to be able to buy a good cheap car that looked crappy with rust, bog it up, drive it for a while and sell it a couple of years later for more than we paid.
Pretty hard to do that now!
AnswerID: 510349

Sponsored Links

Popular Products (13)