touring on a budget

Submitted: Saturday, May 18, 2013 at 11:17
ThreadID: 102277 Views:1969 Replies:7 FollowUps:13
This Thread has been Archived
this is a big thing for me I have this compulsive desire to be on the road but don't really have a great deal of money. ie under 10,000 I still have to do some vehicle prep ie new belts radiator and big service, but I cant get the travel bug out. I want to go to the desert regions and don't mind doing some work on the way does anyone no how tight can you travel on as fuel is probably the biggest expense.
Back Expand Un-Read 0 Moderator

Reply By: Member - John and Val - Saturday, May 18, 2013 at 11:37

Saturday, May 18, 2013 at 11:37
Hi Hilux,

Conventional wisdom suggests that touring costs about $1 per km, but we have found that we generally travel for less than half of that. You are correct in thinking that fuel is the major cost, but it also depends on whether you spend a lot on food, grog and accommodation. We have a thirsty older vehicle, so we always allow a bit for repairs. We prepare our own food, dont drink much but do buy groceries and meat along the way. Where possible we use bush camps but probably use a caravan park once a week, if only to do the washing, although there are a few times and places where a CP is the only option.

We have never worked while travelling but many people do, and provided that you are flexible I think that would be a good way to go to boost your budget a bit.

A small budget is no hindrance to getting out into the deserts provided you have a well maintained vehicle - and you dont need to go overboard with fancy preparation either, unless you are gong to do something more extreme. Have a look through our blogs to get some idea of the kind of travelling that is quite feasible on a less than fancy budget.

Cheers,

Val.
J and V
"Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted."
- Albert Einstein

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

AnswerID: 511300

Follow Up By: Member - eighty matey - Saturday, May 18, 2013 at 13:11

Saturday, May 18, 2013 at 13:11
G'day,

last year's trip was 13,000 kms and cost us $6,500.00.
Fuel was $4000.00.
I think that was including repairs at Kununnurra and a service at Broome.

We had a great trip. We were bush camping as much as possible but we did use van parks and paid camps when we had to.

We did most of our own cooking and had our own drinks, so I'd say a fridge would pay for some of itself for sure. If you haven't got one, we bought an old 35 litre Engel for $350 on Ebay and it hasn't missed a beat.

We are pretty well self sufficient and made sure the vehicle was serviced before we left and had new tyres. The springs and shocks are about two years old.

Hope this helps you some.

Hoo roo,
Steve
1
FollowupID: 789501

Follow Up By: Member - John and Val - Saturday, May 18, 2013 at 13:38

Saturday, May 18, 2013 at 13:38
Steve,

Our figures for last year are pretty similar:
12,000kms in 8 weeks
Total cost a bit under $6000, including $3,500 for fuel. $500 for caravan parks.

We could have covered the same distance but travelled much more slowly. That way the fuel cost would be spread out over a longer time, with just the cost of food and the occasional CP for the extra time.

Cheers,

Val
J and V
"Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted."
- Albert Einstein

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

1
FollowupID: 789503

Follow Up By: Member - eighty matey - Saturday, May 18, 2013 at 16:44

Saturday, May 18, 2013 at 16:44
That's pretty interesting Val.

Our vehicle is an 80 Series Landcruiser wagon, so the vehicles aren't completely dissimilar. That works out around $300 per 1000kms, in round figures.

We travelled about 10,000 kms on dirt which would account for slightly higher fuel consumption on our part.

I urge locked hilux to get out there but be warned.... once you go you will be addicted. Once the red dirt gets in your blood you're hooked. Not that it's a bad thing.

Steve
0
FollowupID: 789515

Follow Up By: Member - John and Val - Saturday, May 18, 2013 at 17:31

Saturday, May 18, 2013 at 17:31
Hi Steve,

Ours is a petrol troopy, but uses about 18l/100km regardless of surface, unless its on loose sand when the figures change in a rather alarming fashion! We did a bit more bitumen driving last year but plenty of gravel as well.

I agree that its quite possible to get out into the remote areas without it costing too much, especially if you are not on a tight time budget. And yes, its highly addictive. It does take a bit of physical effort so my best advice to LH would be to plan carefully, prepare well and then just get out and do it before you get too creaky in the joints ;-)

Cheers,

Val
J and V
"Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted."
- Albert Einstein

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

1
FollowupID: 789524

Follow Up By: locked hilux - Sunday, May 19, 2013 at 21:09

Sunday, May 19, 2013 at 21:09
oh it is too late i have already got the addiction have had for 10 years now use to work as tour guide tried to settle to be responsible for wife but cant do it the bug is so ingrained in me settle for year and that is enough now want to go else where, we have no debts though but no base either, can be hard some times but just want to see this big great country.
0
FollowupID: 789637

Follow Up By: Member - eighty matey - Sunday, May 19, 2013 at 21:26

Sunday, May 19, 2013 at 21:26
Don't fight it brother.....I hope your wife shares your passion.
0
FollowupID: 789642

Reply By: Member - Outback Gazz - Saturday, May 18, 2013 at 15:18

Saturday, May 18, 2013 at 15:18
Howdy

Try this for "Touring on a budget" !

Just had a Czechoslovakian couple stay at my place who have driven from Czech Republic - through Russia - Kazakhstan - Kyrgyzstan - Tajikstan - to South Korea - and around Japan in 12 months - they shipped their beloved Delica L400 to Australia a few months ago and will spend 12 months driving / touring Australia !

Budget for their 2 year journey including all fuel, food, tyres, repairs etc etc is $25,000 Australian.

They do not use caravan parks, they only sleep in the Delica in parks or on the side of the road, alcohol is a very costly luxury they have to do without and never buy take out food or go to restaurants. The shipping cost for their Delica from Japan to Australia was $4000 including Government fees and the 4k came out of their 25,000 dollar budget. They had a break down north of Port Augusta which cost them $1000 in towing fees and repairs - also out of their budget. They picked up some work in WA where they are at the moment, which recovered the towing and repair costs and they are on their way again. Their meals mainly consist of rice and vegetables which they only buy if they are cheap.

Their Delica is very well set up and prepared for long distance travel - has dual batteries, fridge, external shower, dual long range tanks, water tanks etc etc.

They showed me photos of their travels to date and I am envious of what they have
done and where they have been - I would love to copy their trip but no way possible could I do it on their budget !

Bottom line - if you are prepared to work along the way and live within your means it can be done very cheaply.

Just do it and enjoy your trip !


Gazz
AnswerID: 511309

Follow Up By: Member - evaredy - Saturday, May 18, 2013 at 16:03

Saturday, May 18, 2013 at 16:03
It's amazing what you can achieve if you really set your mind to it. If you are prepared to just rough it for awhile then why not just pack and go.
If you never do it, you'll never know and years from now you will kick yourself for not doing it when you had the chance.
0
FollowupID: 789511

Follow Up By: Member - eighty matey - Sunday, May 19, 2013 at 21:30

Sunday, May 19, 2013 at 21:30
We had young friends we travelled with a couple of years ago and their budget for living expenses was $150 a week. That's not including fuel but they travelled right across Australia and back.

They had a great time and experienced heaps. They are vegetarians, so no meat and alcohol was rare.

Steve
0
FollowupID: 789646

Reply By: locked hilux - Saturday, May 18, 2013 at 16:13

Saturday, May 18, 2013 at 16:13
these are all good tips I use to work with backpacker and was surprised with some how much they spent but with other know that they had budget and they where the ones that got out and saw the most. I guess the big thing is what should I take?? have car needs bit work has long range tank. is a camper van costly to tow am looking at that. guess a fridge but by the sounds of it a smaller one is better, had 80l but sold as was just too big, have lived off cans of spag for a while. my problem is I like a comfee bed think camper may help that. . I have a bad travel bug and think it is time to sell all and hit the road again is hard on the wife we settle for bit then move again but all I can think is what so many have told me go and see it while you still can, and are fit enough tp enjoy it.
AnswerID: 511312

Follow Up By: Member - John and Val - Saturday, May 18, 2013 at 17:22

Saturday, May 18, 2013 at 17:22
We have a blog click here detailing how we have set our Troopy up for camping so you might get some ideas from that. Our first requirement was to have a comfortable bed permanently set up and the arrangement of having the bed in the back of the vehicle has worked very well. Our recent addition of the light lockable trailer has also worked very well. I think there is also a bit more info in the "My Profile" section.
I think if you get yourselves set up reasonably well then it should not be too hard on either you or your wife. John and I are well past retirement age, so no spring chickens and we still enjoy our travels in our Troopy. Having said that there are times and places (eg the south coast of WA in winter) where the weather gods can turn against you and you start to cast envious eyes at caravans. But if you plan according to the seasons you can avoid the worst of the weather extremes.

We just have normal insurance but always carry a free standing tent in case we have to put the vehicle in to a garage for a few days.

Cheers,

Val
J and V
"Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted."
- Albert Einstein

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 789522

Follow Up By: Member - eighty matey - Sunday, May 19, 2013 at 21:34

Sunday, May 19, 2013 at 21:34
We have a ShippShape rooftop tent. It cost us $1000 on Ebay plus roof racks.
It sure beats towing and sets up in 5 minutes, 10 to pack up.

Steve
0
FollowupID: 789648

Reply By: Michael ( Moss Vale NSW) - Saturday, May 18, 2013 at 16:23

Saturday, May 18, 2013 at 16:23
Maybe you could consider NRMA premium road service or the road service in your state in case something goes wildly wrong! It could involve accommodation and towing and storage of your vehicle if you have a major breakdown! Michael
Patrol 4.2TDi 2003

Retired 2016 and now Out and About!

There's time to rest when you're dead,
Get out and do something instead!

Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

AnswerID: 511314

Follow Up By: Member - eighty matey - Sunday, May 19, 2013 at 21:40

Sunday, May 19, 2013 at 21:40
NRMA Premium has saved us a few times now.

Last September our steering arm parted company with the front hub about 1 km form the Pentecost River on the Karunjie track.

We fixed it up to get to Wyndham but needed towing to Kununnurra.

NRMA hooked us up with RACWA. They organised a tow to Kununnurra ($500 worth), 2 nights accommodation for us and our dog, plus a hire car for a day.

It entitles you to $3000 worth of help a year and gives you heaps of options if it all goes pear shaped.

We won't leave home without it.

Steve
0
FollowupID: 789651

Reply By: SDG - Saturday, May 18, 2013 at 20:48

Saturday, May 18, 2013 at 20:48
Just got home from a 13000k trip, staying in caravan parks each night. One adult, two kids. Spent around six grand. Still to work out exact figures.
AnswerID: 511336

Follow Up By: SDG - Saturday, May 18, 2013 at 20:50

Saturday, May 18, 2013 at 20:50
Most expensive fuel I found, was in Uluru which was $2.15 I think from memory. (diesel)
0
FollowupID: 789547

Follow Up By: Member - eighty matey - Sunday, May 19, 2013 at 21:24

Sunday, May 19, 2013 at 21:24
Dearest we paid last year was Kunawarritji, in WA, $3.60 a litre....and I appreciated every drop of it.

Steve
0
FollowupID: 789641

Reply By: Bob W5 - Saturday, May 18, 2013 at 23:27

Saturday, May 18, 2013 at 23:27
G'day locked Hilux.My partner and I are about to hit the road, we have a 1999 100series dual fuel cruiser with the lot, a cheap 2nd hand off small road caravan, just enough room for 2. I've been wanting to travel around our big country since I could drive. I'm now 50. And I've simply said we've got what we've got. We only have a bit more than half of what you have. But we've decided that it's time and we will work when ever we can to top up. We have no time limits. We are taking our pets. We are experienced outback travellers. And we will free camp and cook all our own meals. And have a redhot go at it... Happy travels
AnswerID: 511348

Reply By: Member - Joe n Mel n kids (FNQ - Sunday, May 19, 2013 at 23:56

Sunday, May 19, 2013 at 23:56
just do it, you have to be very careful in how you calculate your costs, meaning you will find heaps on here that wil go on about "free camping" and towing vans ect but you MUST look at your over-all costs, what is the actual cost of your car and equipment attached to it, I have seen hundreds of rigs that have a $50k car and a $70k van on it and they complain about costs of staying at caravan parks and spend all day finding "free" camp sites, you have to sit down and work out the basic vehicle needs and get them right, you vehicle can NOT break down, spend good money on tyres, not flash expensive "off road" tyres but just good ones, don't need to be wide, and mechanics of it, replace ALL belts and hoses and all fluids, fix any oil leaks and then worry about where you will stay, if you look at vans you will have to spend at least $10,000 on something that will last and ten grand goes a LONG way on accommodation, and at most of the remote stops you can get work, cant get work at any "free" camps!!!! ...... even a $1000 bucks on a roof top tent is a bleep e load of accommodation, get a tent, under $100 and less weight and roof top tents SUCK, you cant move when set up, with a tent you can at least go out for a few hours and not have to pack it all up again .... yes we have tried one and hated it .... and be careful of trying to get "cheap" fuel, it may be a big expense but not worth busting you butt for it, just allow for it and you will be fine, we lived remote for years and you can do one side of aussie to the other in 2 weeks on $5000 and have a ball ... and a few good drinks, have fun and just go do it, you will never regret it ...
AnswerID: 511426

Sponsored Links

Popular Products (13)