Anyone know if Wright Air got their plane out of Lake Eyre?

Submitted: Wednesday, Jun 05, 2013 at 09:31
ThreadID: 102592 Views:2288 Replies:2 FollowUps:8
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Hi All,

When I went through William Creek early last month one of the Wright Air planes was stuck in Lake Eyre after having to make an emergency landing. I heard via this forum that they were replacing the engine and hoping to fly it out. Given the wet weather out that way was wondering if they we able to get it out? Thanks Pete
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Reply By: lindsay - Wednesday, Jun 05, 2013 at 10:37

Wednesday, Jun 05, 2013 at 10:37
Yep lifted out by chopper to a nearby claypan , flown out and now back a Riddel in Vic.
AnswerID: 512552

Reply By: Ross M - Wednesday, Jun 05, 2013 at 11:42

Wednesday, Jun 05, 2013 at 11:42
I hope it was the very old poorly maintained heap of crap we flew in.
Dull maroon and white.
If it was a car or 4wd it would have been it the wreckers. Totally stuffed and worn out. Shameful to use such things and call it a business.

Could see the Cooper creek out the gaps in the doors with the doors shut.

NOISE, more than standing beside a top fuel dragster.

If you held up a drink can or lunch box it just vibrated. Made nearly all on board very sick.

A flight over Lake Eyre should have been far more enjoyable but not with Wright AIr.

More "wrong air" was the opinion on the day.

Ross M
AnswerID: 512556

Follow Up By: member - mazcan - Wednesday, Jun 05, 2013 at 13:26

Wednesday, Jun 05, 2013 at 13:26
hi ross m
I thought all planes had to pass an air worthiness/safety and maintenance test on a regular basis or is sth.aus exempt /not included
maybe the one your referring to was owned by the original wright brothers perhaps it was there first fixed wing model l o l
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Follow Up By: P and JM - Wednesday, Jun 05, 2013 at 17:30

Wednesday, Jun 05, 2013 at 17:30
Hi All,

All I will say here is;
There is more to Mr Wright than what a lot of people know about him at William Creek.

Cheers P&J
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FollowupID: 791008

Follow Up By: Ross M - Wednesday, Jun 05, 2013 at 17:59

Wednesday, Jun 05, 2013 at 17:59
mazcan
My comment was based on a trip less than 3 years ago.

ALL who saw the plane commented on it's broken down condition.
I think any airworthiness inspector must have inspected it from the Pub Bar (too hot outside) and not quite close enough to see reality.


The doors didn't shut "like a Golf", in fact it needed the whole golf bag full of clubs hitting on the door to shut it.

I became aware of many things about that plane.
I have seen plenty of light plane,s but nothing ever approaching as bad as that one.

Ross M
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Follow Up By: gbc - Wednesday, Jun 05, 2013 at 18:57

Wednesday, Jun 05, 2013 at 18:57
Most doors in light planes/choppers aren't part of the airframe (read surplus to requirement apart from preventing humans from freezing) and are generally only lip service to what a door as you and I know one.
I can seriously guarantee you I've flown in worse. That's no claim to fame I can assure you, just a by product of flying around in light aircraft for work over a long period of time. I've been frozen, soaked, burnt you name it - all as a highly paying passenger.
Plenty of occy straps holding doors shut on jetrangers and the like. I'm in no way excusing a substandard aircraft, just saying some perfectly good working aircraft look like something noone in their right minds would get in.
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Follow Up By: TheMightyMoose - Wednesday, Jun 05, 2013 at 21:08

Wednesday, Jun 05, 2013 at 21:08
"just saying some perfectly good working aircraft look like something noone in their right minds would get in."
Spot on gbc. The chopper we flew in up to Mt Cook in NZ had a bloody big gaping hole in the top of the cabin. Pilot did mention it was bit old. But it got us back safely. I reckon if the pilot is happen to take it up it must be air worthy!
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FollowupID: 791023

Follow Up By: TTTSA - Thursday, Jun 06, 2013 at 06:01

Thursday, Jun 06, 2013 at 06:01
If it was as bad as you say Ross M, why get in it. I wouldn't risk my life in a craft I could obviously see was that bad.
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Follow Up By: Jarse - Thursday, Jun 06, 2013 at 10:24

Thursday, Jun 06, 2013 at 10:24
Maintenance standards are national, as set by CASA. If the plane looks like a bleep box on the outside, it probably IS one. With the exception of the Airvans, most of the aircraft we're talking about would qualify for 'vintage' status if they were cars, they are that old.

I wouldn't take the pilot's willingness to fly a heap of junk-looking aeroplane as a yardstick for its serviceability. Most pilots doing these scenics are the least experienced of commercial pilots, and are often working their first job. Constantly under the threat of the sack if they refuse to fly (that's assuming they're being paid to do the job in the first place).

Not saying that the case with this operator, but it is a general indication of how the industry treats inexperienced pilots.
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Follow Up By: P and JM - Thursday, Jun 06, 2013 at 16:07

Thursday, Jun 06, 2013 at 16:07
Jarse,

Your comment
"Constantly under the threat of the sack if they refuse to fly"
reminds me of a company flying out of W. C.

Cheers P&J
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FollowupID: 791108

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