Cigarette lighter plugs

Submitted: Wednesday, Feb 04, 2004 at 10:52
ThreadID: 10263 Views:1801 Replies:5 FollowUps:10
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Good morning fellow EOs,

I have a very basic question. On a typical cigarette lighter plug there is a terminal on the end and terminals on the sides. Which is positive and which is negative?"Live today as if there may be no tomorrow"

Wombat
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Reply By: Member - Oskar(Bris) - Wednesday, Feb 04, 2004 at 11:02

Wednesday, Feb 04, 2004 at 11:02
End +ve
Sides -ve
Normally (provided you have a normal vehicle with -ve ground connection on your battery.)
Cheers
OskarThe real oskar
AnswerID: 45409

Reply By: Member - Cocka - Wednesday, Feb 04, 2004 at 12:17

Wednesday, Feb 04, 2004 at 12:17
Hi Wombat, I'm not trying to sound smart here but there are a couple of simple ways to check these sort of things. You can get simple small power supply testing screw drivers where a little light glows in the handle when you touch a positive (+) lead. You can also get simple multimeters cheap (Jaycar, Tandy etc) that are also good for testing batteries, globes, circuits, volts etc. Make a test lamp. Plus heaps of others, a good store will show you how they operate.
Should always be part of the kit when you go away.
I guess you have the male section plug which has no power. But check the vehicle's female section (with ignition on) & any of the above devices will tell you where the + is. Carpe Diem
AnswerID: 45416

Follow Up By: Wombat - Wednesday, Feb 04, 2004 at 13:06

Wednesday, Feb 04, 2004 at 13:06
Thanks for the advice Cocka. I just recently bought myself a little Digitor multimeter from DSE and have come to the realisation that I am a total electraphobe. The operating manual says things like "Set the meter to suitable function and range before each measurement" which has me scratching my head and concluding that I am a complete moron. I think I am going to have to learn the meaning of, and/or difference between volts, amps, watts, inut impedance, AC, DC, diodes, etc. before I can even attempt to diagnose electrical issues. Any suggestions how I could do this within the time limitations of running a small business?

I remember many years ago a mate and I decided we could fix the electrical fan on a gas heater. So we got one of those supply testing screwdrivers from my 12V car kit and touched what we thought were th appropriate wires. Next thing we knew we were instantly transported to the couch on the other side of the room. I concluded that it might be safer to get an electrician to look at the fan after that. Funny thing is my mate was pretty cluey and ended up being a Scientific Officer with the CSIRO. I wonder if he understands electrical circuitry these days? . . . I certainly don't!"Live today as if there may be no tomorrow"

Wombat
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FollowupID: 307509

Follow Up By: Member - Ross - Wednesday, Feb 04, 2004 at 14:35

Wednesday, Feb 04, 2004 at 14:35
Wombat

On the voltage range select 20V. Red probe on centre post black on outer should return a reading of say 12.6V. Vice versa with probes should return -12.6V indicating the red (+'ve) is on the earth connection (-'ve).

Oh, by the way, after reading your story about the heater ... DON'T select amps and put the probes across the battery terminals (in parallel) unless you have a spare multi-meter. Amps should always be read in series. e.g. say you want to check the current draw of your fridge, leave fridge connected to earth and connect red probe to power and black probe the fridge.

I'm fairly sure the above is correct but would welcome KIND comments if that is not the case.

Cheers ............. ;-DFidei defensor

Rosco
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FollowupID: 307521

Follow Up By: Bonz (Vic) - Wednesday, Feb 04, 2004 at 14:58

Wednesday, Feb 04, 2004 at 14:58
bring it along to the Desert Wombie and I'll learn ya hahahaIf you hold your heart and focus,
you will end up holding your dream
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FollowupID: 307525

Follow Up By: Wombat - Wednesday, Feb 04, 2004 at 15:01

Wednesday, Feb 04, 2004 at 15:01
You're on Bonz - but I warn you I'm completely electrically illiterate. See you in a couple of weeks."Live today as if there may be no tomorrow"

Wombat
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FollowupID: 307526

Follow Up By: Bonz (Vic) - Wednesday, Feb 04, 2004 at 15:08

Wednesday, Feb 04, 2004 at 15:08
bring along a pencil and paper now, and your best listening earsIf you hold your heart and focus,
you will end up holding your dream
0
FollowupID: 307529

Follow Up By: GOB member vic - Wednesday, Feb 04, 2004 at 16:25

Wednesday, Feb 04, 2004 at 16:25
goodday wombat if you are going to wandin on the 15th chuck your multimeter in the car as i am hoping to meet a few of the faces and i can give you a quick rundown on it or you can wait for bonz at the desert

steveimagine a 03 gu 4.2tdin the picture
as i am having trouble sizing the picture
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FollowupID: 307539

Follow Up By: Wombat - Wednesday, Feb 04, 2004 at 16:26

Wednesday, Feb 04, 2004 at 16:26
I might have to borrow Kiralee's crayons."Live today as if there may be no tomorrow"

Wombat
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FollowupID: 307540

Follow Up By: Wombat - Wednesday, Feb 04, 2004 at 16:28

Wednesday, Feb 04, 2004 at 16:28
Only too happy for double the lessons GOB. See you on the 15th."Live today as if there may be no tomorrow"

Wombat
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FollowupID: 307541

Follow Up By: Member -Bob & Lex (Sydney) - Wednesday, Feb 04, 2004 at 18:03

Wednesday, Feb 04, 2004 at 18:03
It might sink in if he has 2 lessonsRegards Bob
Where to next
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FollowupID: 307550

Follow Up By: Wombat - Thursday, Feb 05, 2004 at 10:23

Thursday, Feb 05, 2004 at 10:23
Gee, thanks Bob!"Live today as if there may be no tomorrow"

Wombat
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FollowupID: 307599

Reply By: jeff-wa - Wednesday, Feb 04, 2004 at 12:32

Wednesday, Feb 04, 2004 at 12:32
Yeah best way, just buy a multimeter, they are like $10 now from Jaycar/Altronics, so cheap it's just not worth buggering around without one.
AnswerID: 45418

Reply By: Arkay - Wednesday, Feb 04, 2004 at 13:16

Wednesday, Feb 04, 2004 at 13:16
Agree with all the above EXCEPT:
All O.K. where up to 12 volts (car batteries) is involved. You can't do TOO much harm to yourself.
BUT DO NOT
do any testing / fixing of 240 volt items (that is, the normal household electricity), such as (I suspect) the fan your were trying to fix, until you really know what you are doing. Else that neat little Wombat in your photo may be without a daddy. Leave 240v to the trained experts.
AnswerID: 45421

Reply By: Eric.- Monday, Feb 09, 2004 at 23:25

Monday, Feb 09, 2004 at 23:25
simple answer to your simple question , the sides are negative the middle is possitiveVenus Bay
AnswerID: 46087

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