Multiple Tyre Plugs

Submitted: Saturday, Jun 08, 2013 at 21:17
ThreadID: 102664 Views:2328 Replies:9 FollowUps:10
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Hi All,

Learnt the hard way today that buying things on ebay can be a false economy sometimes :(

Picked up a second hand Bridgestone LTD697 as my spare and had it fitted a couple of weeks ago to only find out today it was flat.

Upon closer inspection and some detergent spray on the tyre I found a few small/slow leaks on the shoulder of the tyre.

I have sent the ebay seller an email to see what he says but I am wondering is it possible to put some plugs in the tyre and still have it as a useable spare?

We're heading up the Kimberley in 2 weeks so need to sort something out pretty soon.

Thanks in advance.

Cheers, Lloyd
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Reply By: garrycol - Saturday, Jun 08, 2013 at 22:13

Saturday, Jun 08, 2013 at 22:13
Caveat emptor. I doubt you will get a response from the seller.

About the only thing you can do is take it to a repairer asn see if it can be plugged - on the shoulder it usually cannot be repaired but there is nothing lost asking.

Garry
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Reply By: Roughasguts - Saturday, Jun 08, 2013 at 22:16

Saturday, Jun 08, 2013 at 22:16
Yup put some plugs in it! cause the practice won't hurt, and you should have a plug kit in any case.

But get a good one steer away from the plastic handle ones.

My old Bridgestones must of had all up 20-30 plugs in them, not one ever failed and had to be re-done.

Cheers.
AnswerID: 512810

Follow Up By: Member - Keith P (NSW) - Saturday, Jun 08, 2013 at 22:34

Saturday, Jun 08, 2013 at 22:34
Probably the best thing to do is stick a tube in it...providing there are no busted steel cords poking through on the inside. I reckon this tyre has copped a bit of run-flat-for-a-while syndrome...but a tube should fix it...all being equal that is. It should really only be used as a spare ...n turfed as soon as affordable really.
HTH.

Cheers Keith
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Reply By: Echucan Bob - Saturday, Jun 08, 2013 at 22:34

Saturday, Jun 08, 2013 at 22:34
Lloyd, I've been dudded so often by bricks and mortar retailers it makes me wonder how different life might have been otherwise. Most stuff I buy now is on eBay. It saves a bomb. Spare car parts are a classic example. The extremely rare eBay disappointment has to be put into perspective.

Bob
AnswerID: 512812

Follow Up By: Member - Redbakk (WA) - Saturday, Jun 08, 2013 at 23:11

Saturday, Jun 08, 2013 at 23:11
I agree with Bob, saved a bundle buying on EBAY, but I occasionally get it wrong but not too often.

However in regards to the tyre, if it is in good nick besides a couple of pin holes, which might be able to be plugged, consider having a tube fitted.
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Reply By: Mick O - Saturday, Jun 08, 2013 at 23:10

Saturday, Jun 08, 2013 at 23:10
Lloyd, jut check around the tyre edge for the date of manufacture. This should indicate if the tyre is old & brittle. Slow leaks around the shoulder on older tyres can be indicative of worse things than can be fixed by plug! If it's 5 years or older, i'd recommend getting rid of it and getting something a bit better.

Cheers Mick
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Follow Up By: Member - Redbakk (WA) - Saturday, Jun 08, 2013 at 23:13

Saturday, Jun 08, 2013 at 23:13
Also agree with Mick here about the year of manufacture, something to consider.
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Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Sunday, Jun 09, 2013 at 11:32

Sunday, Jun 09, 2013 at 11:32
Hi Mick and Redbakk

The age of the 697 will not be an issue, as they are the replacement of the 694, and have only been on the market for around 14 months.


Cheers



Stephen
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Reply By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Saturday, Jun 08, 2013 at 23:27

Saturday, Jun 08, 2013 at 23:27
Put a tube in it.
Multiple small leaks is a worry though - my guess is that the tyre has suffered delamination due to being run at very low pressure.
AnswerID: 512817

Reply By: Idler Chris - Sunday, Jun 09, 2013 at 10:56

Sunday, Jun 09, 2013 at 10:56
I would never put in a tube. They are trouble waiting to happen in most situations for most people. A quick fix is a plug put in from the outside. A better fix is a good quality internal patch like a rema tip-top patch, correctly fitted or a mushroom plug also internally fitted. If the damage is greater than can be fixed by these two methods then the tyre is to dangerous to use anyway and if you were to use a tube it is unlikely to last long.
The two biggest problems with tubes are their quality has deteriorated and that on newer vehicles, particularly with alloys, the profile of the rims are not tube friendly. Also if you were to use a tube you would have to remove any internal TPMS which is the last thing you want to do with a tyre you are having an issue with.
This advice is for those of you who are unsure as to which way to go. This advice will work every time. There will be people who will say they have used tubes and never had an issue and there are certainly circumstances when a tube will fix a problem. However the fact remains that a internal patch or plug is safer and more likely to fix the problem and in many case the fix, if done correctly, will last the life of the tyre.
I do a lot of very remote outback travel so I need to be able repair punctures safely and reliably which is the basis of my recommendations. If you do not travel in extreme situations then you may be able to get away with not being able to to get to the inside of your tyres to be able to fix them.
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Follow Up By: Member - The old fellow - Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 08:02

Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 08:02
Hi. I have a near new BFG. a/t that was staked very high on the wall. Stake about 7mm in diameter.
Had a patch put on the inside and plugged, put in a heavy duty tube.
Can't see it being a problem. Any Opinions ?
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Follow Up By: Idler Chris - Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 08:32

Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 08:32
How do you put a patch over a hole that has a plug in it? Who did this repair? And are you giving your insurance company an out should you have an accident?
If you are going to use a tube a heavy duty tube should be the minimum.
As mentioned by others a repaired tyre is not as safe or as reliably as a tyre without repairs. The level of risk to life and limb will depend on where you go and what you do - your call.
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Follow Up By: Member - The old fellow - Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 09:07

Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 09:07
Thanks Chris. My error a plug may not have been used , it was a patch about 5cm in diameter. Didn't see it being done but looked an extremely neat job. Edges of patch were feathered neatly, Looked a better job than some plugs.
May just use it as a spare although I weep when thinking of the of another new tyre !!
Can't remember the town where it was repaired but it was a reasonably large tyre service centre.

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Follow Up By: garrycol - Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 09:52

Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 09:52
It would have been a mushroom plug from the inside of the tyre - the way modern tyres are correctly repaired these days (and is safe). The plugs that we all carry with us and push through from the outside are for emergency use and are not intended for permanent use - yes we all do it and many do not have an issue. What should happen is that when these plugs are used, you take the tyre to a repairer at the next opportunity and get a proper repair done.

As far as tubes in modern radials - is a hit an miss affair. The inside of modern radials is rougher than the old bias ply and often have ribs in the inside moulding. This roughness and ribs can cause the tubes to rub and wear through causing failure - again might not be an issue in some occasions but in others will fail. Again is really an emergency measure to get you out of a problem not a permanent solution.

Garry
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Follow Up By: Member - The old fellow - Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 10:49

Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 10:49
Thanks Garry You say "then get a proper repair done". This mushroom patch is a proper job?
The tube the guy put in was a normal one and I replaced it with a heave duty type.
I would have thought that the mushroom patch along with the HD tube would be ok but if the consensus is don't use it I will retire the tyre to being a spare.
Many thanks all.
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Follow Up By: garrycol - Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 13:59

Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 13:59
If the tyre has repaired properly the no tube will be needed. Tyre fitters will not repair a tyre if the repair will not meet safety requirements.
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Reply By: CSeaJay - Sunday, Jun 09, 2013 at 12:39

Sunday, Jun 09, 2013 at 12:39
Lloyd
I would seriously suggest another spare tyre. From all accounts this one has seen many miles. On a Kimberley trip is suggest tyres are your most valuable asset and most important need for a good spare
CJ
AnswerID: 512837

Reply By: Member - J&R - Sunday, Jun 09, 2013 at 16:10

Sunday, Jun 09, 2013 at 16:10
Of course it can be fixed. Either plugs or a tube.

Then you can spend the rest of your holidays wondering if it will last as long as you need it to and if it will be flat again when you do need it..
But that's another example of false economy isn't it.
AnswerID: 512847

Reply By: Member - Stanley D - Wednesday, Jun 12, 2013 at 18:02

Wednesday, Jun 12, 2013 at 18:02
Regarding Tyre Plugs: Returning from Arkaroola, I had a stone puncture and whilst the damage was being investigated and it was established that the repair was beyond patches (could put one's finger through). As he changed the wheel etc., I asked the tyre guy about the efficiency of plugs for punctures. He stated that it was illegal to plug a tyre, as the law had changed for the use of plugs in S.A. Just passing it on!
AnswerID: 513003

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