A Bull Bar that is made for the job

Hi all

One important piece of aftermarket equipment that is purchased for many four wheel drives is a bull bar.

In the past on my Pajeros and on the Prado when I purchased it, I had alloy bars, as I thought that they looked better.

A couple of years ago I had an issue with the standard Toyota alloy bar that literally broke at the mounting points and left a very sour taste in my mouth. Looking around, I went for an ARB steel bar and have been happy so far.

During our recent forced trip to the Flinders for a week, due to wet weather forcing us to cancel our Birdsville Track trip, I had the miss fortune of testing out just how good the steel bar is over an alloy bar....like chalk and cheese.

Heading back to camp right on dusk on Tuesday evening, we were down to 80 kph, being aware that it was the time of night for kangaroos. Right out of know where a kangaroo appeared right in front of us. Things happened that quick that I did not even have time to brake. We hit the poor roo dead centre of the vehicle and stopped the vehicle immediately, expecting to find the front smashed in.

The only damage which I find hard to believe was the front number plate completely bent up from the impact, with no other damage because of the strenght and quality of the steel bar, and fur lodges in the front rubber inserts.

If it was an alloy bar, I know things would have been completely different, and if I had no protection at all, the front end would have been in a very sad state and the radiator would have been taken out.

So the moral of the story is buy a bar that will protect your vehicle and not something that is shiney and is all looks.


Safe travels and keep away from Roos.


Cheers


Stephen
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Reply By: Life Member - Phil B (WA) - Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 01:09

Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 01:09
Hi Stephen,

I hit a roo with an ally bar - fortunately it wasn't at speed and the roo was small or it would have had a disaster. Anyway the ally bar went to the scrap dealer and I got an ARB steel bar.

While they make ally nudge bars - there's a reason why ARB dont make ally bull bars; they aren't up to the job.

all the best
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Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 07:45

Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 07:45
Hi Phil

We have had a few near misses over the years but up until now, never hit one. We all have seen the bodies of dead wildlife on the sides of the road and we often comment on I wonder if the driver could have avoided the poor animal and now I know first hand that it happens in split second timing.

I hope things are fine with you and still hoping you may be there in August.


All the Best.


Cheers


Stephen
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Reply By: Candace S. - Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 01:16

Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 01:16
Since you mention this, I recently had a similar experience here in Utah, USA! In my case, I hit a rather large deer nearly dead-on while going about the same speed you were.

Fortunately, I too had fitted my vehicle with an after-market steel bumper/bull bar. But as you can see the impact was sufficient that a certain amount of damage still resulted. I'm not sure if the bolts attaching the bumper to the frame (as you can see, one of them sheared off) were not fully tightened, or if it's simply due to the design of the attachment point.

I received the vehicle back from the collision repair shop on Friday, and the total repair cost was nearly US$2500, though thanks to insurance I only had to pay $400.

But indeed, had I not had the additional protection up there, the damages would have been much more serious and expensive! Plus I certainly wouldn't have been able to drive the vehicle the rest of the way home.











You duplicated my experience right down to the bent up plate, lol!
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Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 07:50

Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 07:50
Hi Candace

You are very lucky indeed and it does make you think what would have been the results if there was nothing up front at all.


All the Best


Cheers



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Follow Up By: Member - PJR (NSW) - Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 08:09

Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 08:09
The beauty of the right accessory is that you were still able to drive out. And if it had been in a desert or the middle of death valley you would be fine.

Phil
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Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 08:16

Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 08:16
Hi Phil

That is for sure and it is a case of we have the bar, but hope we never have to try it out.

I know for sure that if we had nothing at all, it would have been an expensive insurance claim.


Cheers



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Follow Up By: Member - PJR (NSW) - Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 08:33

Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 08:33
Hi Stephen

In our prang (post below) what was more important was that there weren't any medical or hospital problems. We were safe and sound. No one hurt.

Phil
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Follow Up By: Candace S. - Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 13:30

Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 13:30
Yes, to be sure the best result was there were no injuries or worse (at least to people)! In my case as well as all the others listed here. It's a lot easier to fix up a 4WD than a person.
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Reply By: Member - John (Vic) - Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 01:35

Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 01:35
I have hit a couple of Roos in recent years, steel ARB bar with side rails did the job, knocked the Roos down and under the car.

I will add that results are obviously going to be dependent on the size of the animal hit, speed of travel and if the roo is on a downward hop rather than catch him as he rises on the hop which could mean he hits high on the bar and slides across the bonnet.

No doubt luck is involved but a good quality steel bar is far more resilient than a soft ally bar or those plastic ones than bend and give so much the literally fold back into the body work.

So long as no one is hurt Steven and hopefully the poor bloody roo was killed outright, not nice having to deal with an injured animal :(

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Follow Up By: Member - John (Vic) - Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 01:37

Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 01:37
Sorry, that should have been "Stephen"...bloody auto correct!!

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Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 08:03

Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 08:03
Hi John

We certainly had luck on our side that night for sure. We were travelling slightly uphill and because of the time of night, high beam was not effective at all.

We did not even see the roo at all and it was just there. Also very lucky that it was not a Big Red, as it sure would have been a different outcome for sure.

When the roo hit, we were lucky the impact did not knock it into the air and on the bonnet, but rather straight under the vehicle. The roo was killed outright and even though we have them in plague numbers, I am a real softy and I felt terrible for what happened.


Cheers


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Follow Up By: Member - John (Vic) - Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 09:57

Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 09:57
I'm a bit the same, don't like killing the buggas, but I'm not going to kill myself trying to avoid them either, just lift the foot, no braking and take the animal straight on the bar.
In most instances it happens so fast you don't get the opportunity to do much else.
Much better than swerving and putting the car on its roof or into oncoming traffic etc.



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Follow Up By: Member - Mark (Tamworth NSW) - Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 10:33

Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 10:33
John

Have you had a plastic bar which bend back onto the body? Or have you seen a damaged vehicle which this has happened to?

I have one of those plastic bars, hit numerous roos @ around 80km/hr, never damaged my Pajero. I have a friend who farms on the western Downs in Qld (where there are more large roos than anywhere else I have seen in Australia), he has them fitted to all his farm utes/ 4WDs, which collectively hit at least a roo a month. It was his practical experiences that changed my thinking on plastic bars.
I won't criticize steel bars though alloy bars are more of a liability for reasons listed above. A bar such as yours with side rails certainly has better protection than front only protection. But please before you criticize a product, have some evidence.
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Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 10:55

Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 10:55
Hi Mark

I have heard good reports about the polly smart bars, and yes I know someone that has one. Yes he hit a sheep and put a very nice big bend dead centre.

After a few hours in the sun, over 95% of the bend completely gone and now after a number of years, you can only just see a slight indentation. If it was alloy, it would have been another bar and body damage.


Cheers


Stephen
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Follow Up By: Member - John (Vic) - Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 10:57

Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 10:57
Yes Mark have seen the direct results of a roo strike plus the test videos conducted by ARB comparing the various bars.

No mate of a mate comment by me :)

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Follow Up By: Member - Mark (Tamworth NSW) - Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 16:54

Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 16:54
John

That's the problem, ARB who installed my plastic bar tried to talk me out of a plastic one to sell me their steel bar, there has to be a conflict of interest, or lack of impariality.
Smart Bar (have) produced the video/ series of photos with their point of view.
I too was scepetical until my friend with then probably well over a hundred of roos strikes pointed out his experience.

Mark
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Follow Up By: Rockape - Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 19:04

Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 19:04
I can vouch for the smart poly bar as we changed to them where I worked. They were excellent, and I also have witnessed first hand the results after steel and plastic bars hit solid rock.

Similar damage to the vehicles but the plastic bars didn't have to be replaced. The steel ones were RS. This was repeated over quite a few contacts with the immovable objects by different vehicles.

I would have fitted one to my new vehicle, but couldn't get one at the time.
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Follow Up By: Echucan Bob - Thursday, Jun 13, 2013 at 11:00

Thursday, Jun 13, 2013 at 11:00
I watched the videos of the comparisons between steel, aluminium and plastic bars. Yes, the plastic returned to their original shape, but bent back into the radiator at the point of impact. So the bar didn't require replacement, but the radiator did!

I haven't had a bull bar for ten years, and it has made me drive defensively. The only issue has been what to hang the lights off.

Bob
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Follow Up By: Rockape - Thursday, Jun 13, 2013 at 21:01

Thursday, Jun 13, 2013 at 21:01
Bob,
you watched today tonight but I was there and have seen the real result. If you would like to run your vehicle into a rock wall at 40 kph with types of bars at any angle, I will concede that your results are spot on.

I can remember when doctors said smoking didn't hurt you.

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Reply By: Member - PJR (NSW) - Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 08:27

Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 08:27
We recently slipped into a drainage ditch on the left hand side of a track and slid along a rather steep rock wall. Luckily it wasn't the other side because the right hand side was almost vertically DOWN. Yeah! My mistake. Also luckily only at less than 40KPH according to Ozi's log.

The front left corner of the main bar itself took most "bang" out of it and kept the front off the rock wall, protecting the front of the car. The steel rock sliders helped keep the wheels and running gear off the wall also. All four side panels were damaged. All four had to be replaced. The single wheel carrier and all the plastic stuff across the back was destroyed.

$11000+ insurance bill. New front bar (ARB commercial), front guard, rear quarter panel, two doors, read dual bar (that's an upgrade - cheaper than the original plastic stuff and all the mounting hardware).

And most importantly NO MEDICAL issues at all. Never alloy again for us.

Just a bend in the steel bar and lots of side panel work work, but we got home safe and sound.

Phil

PS We got the right hand side buffed to remove the pinstriping from that side so the car looked balanced.
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Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 09:28

Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 09:28
Hi Phil

You were very lucky indeed and a good outcome that no one was injured


Cheers

Stephen
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Reply By: Mick O - Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 09:19

Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 09:19
An ever present danger Stephen which is why I enforce a “no travel at night” policy as much as I can. Not withstanding I’ve knocked a couple of roos over the years and had a near miss with a very large Camel near Empress Spring. It was broad daylight and he just popped out of the thick scrub in front of us. Thankfully I was only doing about 45 kph so was able to slam on the brakes as we met his rear end. The end result was we met his southern end dead on (he was heading north) with the bull bar clipping his back legs and pushing them forward forcing him to sit....on the bulbar and my bonnet. After an indeterminate period of time during which men and beast came to terms with the event, said dromedary extracted its heels, stood up and wandered off (with a little bit of a limp). No real damage to the vehicle other than the bonnet had been jammed down so tight, I had to pop the catch with a screw driver and reset it. Bullbar all good and the spring base of the CB areal had a lot of camel hair in it!

Needless to say passenger and driver were glad that beast didn't come over the bonnet as it would have been lights out for all!


Cheers Mick
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Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 09:36

Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 09:36
Hi Mick

A roo is one thing....but the camel a very different story. I can only imagine your heart rate when it came out in front of you.

It makes you wonder what the outcome would have been with an alloy bar, or none at all. Like you say, at least you were able to drive away safely.



Cheers



Stephen


ps , not long now for your little venture, so if i do not have any more contact with you until then, all the best and looking forward to your blogs on the trip.
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Follow Up By: Member - John (Vic) - Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 11:02

Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 11:02
Lucky he didn't crap on the bonnet :)

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Follow Up By: Mick O - Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 16:58

Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 16:58
Lucky ther driver didn't crap his pants John...the passenger certainly did!
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Reply By: Dave B ( BHQ NSW) - Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 10:30

Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 10:30
Glad you got out of the skirmish pretty well unscathed Stephen.
It amazes me why kangaroos want to jump out and read your numberplate for some reason. They do it so often.
But there is another lesson there in your post as far as I am concerned, and that is your speed at 80 kph.
At least at that speed, you have a chance of surviving the force of impact with a lesser amount of damage, and were able to drive home without any injuries.
I never travel more than 80kph out in the outback at night for that reason, and am constantly amazed how many vehicles whiz past at 100kph, seemingly oblivious to any risk of situations like yours.
Like Mick O, I rarely travel at night for that reason, but sometimes it is unavoidable.
You are lucky you didn't lose a spotlight or two, roos don't have much respect for them either.
cheers
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Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 11:08

Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 11:08
Hi Dave

Yes we were very lucky indeed and no other damage apart from the very bent number plate.

Year ago on the Burra - Morgan Road, we were down to 60kph as there were dozens of roos everywhere.

A brand spanking new Hilux past us at around 90 - 100kph and Fiona and I both said he was crazy, with no protection on the front of his new Hilux and the speed that he was doing with all the roos around.

Every now and then, you would see his brake lights go on in the distance and that was the last of him we saw until the 80kph sign as you come into Morgan.

On the side of the road was one of the biggest Big Red kangaroos dead we have ever seen, and was a very fresh kill. Down the road around 200 metres was the brand new Hilux and you would have thought that he hit a stobie pole. The front end completely ruined and right on the very outskirts of Morgan.

I his case, speed alone would have been the biggest factor and even if he had a good bar, the size of the roo that he hit would have offered not a lot of protection, well that is what I think anyway.

Regards to Nora.


Cheers


Stephen
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Follow Up By: Hairy (NT) - Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 11:11

Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 11:11
Gday,
Its not the speed that is an issue in my opinion, but the conditions. In some areas 130kmh at night is quite safe depending on conditions, vehicle set up and local knowledge.

Cheers
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Follow Up By: Member - Keith P (NSW) - Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 11:24

Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 11:24
I have an early model BARJO alloy bar on my GQ patrol. The one that is made out of 8mm main channel reinforced with 5mm flat and has 5mm wall piping. all double welded ...and still very light. Impact numbers are up to 14 roos and 1 horse so far. Apart from a very slight twist to the L/H main upright courtesy of the horse, which had to be put down..the bar still looks good and the twist can only be seen from the right angle. It still sits square on truck ...and the driving lights sit back in behind main frame which gives them pretty good protection.
This is the second Patrol this bar has been on...and probably the last ...as whatever fourby replaces it will no doubt have to have an airbag specific bar on it. So ..while I agree with most on here about modern alloy bars .. there are some out there that are incredibly strong.... and light ...which I believe can only be good for the truck in the long term

Cheers Keith
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Follow Up By: Member - Broodie H3 - Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 12:52

Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 12:52
It Is only my opinion that the people that go speeding past you on country roads just on dusk are generally the same people that call you slow coach and have never hit anything on a country road' My wife used to be one of those people, who love to get home in one hell of a hurry. We would leave Geraldton at about 4.00pm and head down the track refuel at the S bend and she would have the first drive, this particular trip home to Perth we were going to stop off at Jurien Bay and see her sister so we turn off the brand onto the Jurien road this is the turn off after Dongara, cross the railway line and we are increasing speed we are now doing the 110 speed limit I say slow down you will hit a roo at this time of night, no response is the firm reply, next I say roo on the left 250 meters so what do we do we speed up don't we we are now doing 125klm/p/hr roo hops out to the edge of the road, slow down says I, we are now doing 130. roo is now 10mters in front I feel the surge in acceleration roo hops onto road, bang, wife keeps driving no stop to check on animal no stop to check for vehicle damage, just keep driving after four or five k's I say are you going to stop so I can check the damage so we pull over. left hand side all bashed in bonnet twisted and dented but nothing leaking that I could see, so we go to Jurien and stay over night. That was in a Mitsubishi Magna no Bull bar no protection what so ever. We no longer travel at that time of night and if we absolutely have too it is with more respect for wild life, the reason for the accident that could have been avoided, I was telling her how to drive, that was twenty years ago. LOL. by the way we now have bull bars on both of our vehicles mainly ally as I feel that if I do happen to hit something there is some give and that may just be enough to save some poor unfortunate animals life, instead of being sent to animal heaven as my grand daughter calls it. Just some information to justify, why I use ally Bars. I hope you enjoyed the tale
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Follow Up By: Hairy (NT) - Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 13:08

Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 13:08
And you just sat there and let her drive like that?
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Follow Up By: Member - Frank P (NSW) - Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 13:31

Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 13:31
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Follow Up By: Member - Broodie H3 - Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 14:23

Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 14:23
No Matter what I said or did would have and did do made no difference to the way she reacted at the time and even to this day she is still the same always right. very strong and stubborn woman, but I love her to bits and frustration, and that's probably why we have lasted forty years this year. she paid for the repairs my brother in law and I went back and found the roo and I wound up having to put it down. But in her defence. she was tired and upset with everything that went on that day and nothing involved me for a change and she wanted the drive to keep her mind off everything,and she could not be talked out of that either. and she did learn not to drive when upset and tired, so that was a positive. I accept your criticisms thank you
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Reply By: Member - Scott M (NSW) - Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 12:19

Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 12:19
I would NEVER travel without mine. So far it's accounted for 3 roos, 2 goats, a stand of Silky Oak saplings, and about 30 meters of gravel bank with even a scratch.
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Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 15:03

Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 15:03
Hi Scott

Sounds like your bar has paid for itself many times over.


Cheers



Stephen
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Follow Up By: Echucan Bob - Thursday, Jun 13, 2013 at 13:41

Thursday, Jun 13, 2013 at 13:41
Scott, it sounds like you like to get "off road" a bit!
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Follow Up By: Member - Scott M (NSW) - Thursday, Jun 13, 2013 at 19:57

Thursday, Jun 13, 2013 at 19:57
Bob, in the case of the 30 meters of gravel bank, it was more "off-road" than I'd planned for ... at least the phoenix of my new 40 series rose out of the "ashes" of the old one.... the Bull Bar and eveything forward of the fire-wall survived.

The bull bar was one of the first items resurrected.
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Reply By: member - mazcan - Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 12:48

Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 12:48
hi stephen
even though we all think that a bull bar is the greatest invention since sliced bread ??
most of the bars designed these days only stop a roo if your lucky enough for the roo to hit in the right section of it
most of the modern ones all have large spaces between the upright bars where the roo can literally fall straight through with the forces of been hit at speed

I have had more than my fair share of disputes with roo's and emu's and a sheep
the last 2 bars I have bought I went and had extra uprights welded in to stop roos going through and taking out the radiator
you can get by with a smashed light but not a holed or crumpled radiator/aircond or oil cooler/turbo inter cooler
anyone who knows anything about hitting roo's knows that they come out unseen from the bushes like a rocket and quiet often if you see the first one and miss hitting that
murphys law says you will hit the next 2 or3 that are determined follow
it
they can be at any height and no 2 ever hit in the same place or angle
their bodies are very flexible and can fold or twist or deflect one way or the other when hit and go through the spaces that are in the modern bars
the design of the front of vehicles these days with dual head lights and large indicator
lights doesn't help the designers
the only thing that would efficiently help would be weld mesh
but under design rules I don't think that's allowed now
also with the built-in crumple zones a roo bar that is built really strong and capable of having nil visual damage to the bar can actually crumple the chassis further back
this was shown to me by a crash repairer on a rodeo ute that hit a large roo at 110k's
the roo hit on the drivers side of the bar but still wrote it off with the crumpling effect
they checked the vehicle on a chassis aligner machine

so although it is peace of mind to have a bull/roobar when out on country roads its pays to still be cautious
you and others are right when saying 80k's is a better speed and also avoid night driving and do not try and dodge a roo
much safer to hit it as i've seen countless rolled vehicles out where I was farming years ago who all finished up with a death or injuries and a totally wrecked vehicle because they tried to miss the animal

cheers
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Follow Up By: member - mazcan - Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 12:56

Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 12:56
oh yes and forgot to include the dear old airbag in the design difficulties
incorporated
cheers lol
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Follow Up By: Dave B ( BHQ NSW) - Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 13:05

Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 13:05
Your right about not trying to dodge the roos.
Just hit the brakes if you have time, and keep the car straight.
Even at a modest 80 kph, it is way to fast to try and turn or swerve.
You will probably finish up off the road skidding along on your doorhandles or even your roof rack.
And the other thing to bear in mind is how far away is someone to help you out of the vehicle if you have upended it.
At least if you keep the vehicle straight, you have a good chance of getting out without any injuries.
cheers
Dave
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Reply By: coonick - Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 16:21

Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 16:21
This is like comparing which bread is better.
I have seen your precious arb steel bar crumble like a pretzel and causing severe damage to the front end after hitting an average sized grey roo......not a big red. Yes it may have been at over 100kmh.
Of course a steel bar will usually save a front end at 80kmh but a well engineered and developed alloy bar will do the same. Don't semis have alloy bullbars ???????
You would think there would be a reason other than weight.
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Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 17:56

Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 17:56
Hi Coonick

I am comparing my steel bar with the standard Toyota Alloy bar and the other bars that I have had on my Pajeros.

I know we were very lucky and to be honest, we were expecting to see a bent and damaged front bar.

I hope there is never a next time and it could be all very different.


Cheers


Stephen
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Reply By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 17:24

Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 17:24
Gday Stephen,
yep, its reassuring to have an ARB steel bar, which is why I have one.

But...
Its added 70kgs to the front end, so stronger springs have gone in.
And to fit the bullbar I removed a lump of aluminium channel that looked to be as strong than the bullbar and was positioned to protect the radiator and coolers.

A mate hit a roo in the Flinders last year at 80kph - he was towing a van so no chance of slowing but he also drives a 120 series Prado. The roo hit just to the left of centre, went under the vehicle and damaged some stuff on the drawbar of his van. But the damage to his standard bumper was not great - he was disappointed - he was hoping there was enough damage for him to get a free bullbar out of insurance, but much to his disgust, they repaired the plastic bumper bar!!

But I've seen a lot of damage to other vehicles from roo strikes. Probably most striking on the Nullabor some years back - we pulled up to camp and the follow morning picked up fuel at Mundrabilla - a new Tarago had rolled that night after a roo strike - had 8 people inside and a number were injured and were flown out at midnight with the help of the flying doctor. Also a small vehicle there which had done huge damage after hitting roo.
Its nice to have piece of mind.

Cheers
Phil
AnswerID: 512912

Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 17:49

Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 17:49
Hi Phil

We were very lucky indeed and I know one thing.....if we were in our Golf it would have been a very different situation, with a very good chance of even rolling it.

The front would have been very seriously damaged, and there is no way that it would have gone under because of its very low ground clearance, which i believe would in turn cause the Golf to roll.



Cheers


Stephen
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Reply By: cookie1 - Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 19:28

Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 19:28
Stephen, out of interest, did your air bags go off? I am paranoid about these things - yep dont like them in the outback at all.
AnswerID: 512923

Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 20:00

Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 20:00
Hi cookie

No we were very lucky that the air bags did not go off, I think the impact was not great enough.

Cheers



Stephen
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