dehydrated foods

Submitted: Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 15:27
ThreadID: 102698 Views:1509 Replies:7 FollowUps:4
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Good afternoon all,
I am just wondering if anyone has used the dehydrated foods from the shop and what they think of them, as I am going across the GCR and Plenty to Brisbane I thought that they would make for a quick meal while travelling, is there much of a range in the products and would one packet feed two people. thank you for your comments.
regards Broodie h3
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Reply By: Alloy c/t - Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 15:42

Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 15:42
Only 1 problem with dehydrated and that is when you weigh up the weight savings versus the weight and quantity of the extra water required to rehydrate + initial cost , it becomes a rather expensive not really tasty meal ,
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Reply By: Member - Mark (Tamworth NSW) - Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 17:12

Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 17:12
Broodie

I've used them when doing multi day backpacking bushwalks. One meal is not enough for me. Yes they make a quick meal and no cleaning up, but if you have a decent fridge it doesn't take much longer to use rice and or pasta with a decent sauce you either make or buy. Taste wise, well they are better than hospital food but that's about it.
There is a decent range, 4 or 5 and deserts. Backcountry brand from NZ seems to be the main brand.
AnswerID: 512911

Reply By: Grumblebum and the Dragon - Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 18:16

Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 18:16
We have travelled both with our Bushtracker - no problem with real food. We have only used these type of packaged foods when backpacking through the bush and far from fresh food. They are a bit like bush tucker - keeps you alive but the taste...... nah stay with real food.
AnswerID: 512916

Reply By: 08crd - Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 21:03

Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 21:03
The only dehydrated food we take is small packets of peas and beans, find them great to add to a meal.
AnswerID: 512926

Reply By: Mick O - Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 23:02

Monday, Jun 10, 2013 at 23:02
Broodie, as the king of contingency, I learnt a very valuable lesson from my Canadian travel companions Scott & Gaby. When I first met them at Well 12 on the CSR, when invited to cook at our fire, they came with a can of Stag-chilly each (and a bottle of baileys...the reason we liked them immediately!). Further investigation revealed that their entire larder consisted of canned food. Now before I actually knew that Gaby couldn’t cook, there appeared a certain symmetry to this and it’s an idea that I’ve adopted and carried forward. Being an old bushwalker from the 70’s we always carried dehydrated food as it existed then (life is full of Vesta situations). The offset was the need to carry enough water to rehydrate the meals which in hindsight, actually outweighed the benefits! Great if you’re bushwalking in the Grampians in spring but bad if it was a desert walk through the Raak country of the Mallee.

The guts of my argument is that “Can Night” as we’ve grown to know it is a fantastic way to meet those particularly challenging days when by 19:00 hours after a gruelling day and then 3 hours of tyre repairs, you simply can’t be shagged cooking! No water needed, a fire, a can, one glove (left hand) and a fork or spoon is all you need. The bonus is minimal dishes and your left hand gets warm by holding the can! We love the ‘chunky’ variety soups. A MEAL IN A CAN. Who’d have thought that a nation so close to America could come up with such a good idea...”Can Night”...we love it!


Go the can mate. Cheers Mick
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Follow Up By: Member - Broodie H3 - Tuesday, Jun 11, 2013 at 01:07

Tuesday, Jun 11, 2013 at 01:07
Mick, way back when that was all I used to take with me when I first set off for Darwin in 1972 all I had was a mk2 cortina my uniform, and five cans of baked beans five cans of camp pie, knife and fork and a plate and three hundred dollars for fuel and two blankets, and I am still alive to tell the tale, thank you for reminding me of how far I have been civilized over the last couple of decades I think I shall go the cans, they have been around longer anyway. My parents god bless them thought I was mad. Brisbane here I come. thank you all for your input
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Reply By: Member - Terra'Mer - Tuesday, Jun 11, 2013 at 15:31

Tuesday, Jun 11, 2013 at 15:31
Hi Broodie,
I have used the vegetarian varieties in the same brands and they are good but after a week or 2 leave you wanting more variety. I eat most of a 2 serve pack in one sitting if I'm bushwalking.
I also pack Tasty Bites Indian and Asian meals for a quick easy meal on rice and they don't need rehydration, just cook in the bag.
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Reply By: gbc - Tuesday, Jun 11, 2013 at 17:40

Tuesday, Jun 11, 2013 at 17:40
I'm just back from a 3 day kayak trip over the long weekend up the upper noosa river, using the backcountry cuisine as dinners.
The biggest plus i suppose is that you don't need cooking gear per se, just the ability to heat water, which means a micro stove and a billy cup is all I needed, and washing up was limited to slightly burned porridge in the mornings :(
As others have stated, taste is a bit hit and miss. One night I had beef curry which was o.k. then thai chicken curry the next. The taste was good, but if you ONLY like your curry at medium heat I'd suggest giving it the swerve. Maybe someone got the mix wrong but it was a bit spicy for even a curry lover.
I've had some of those precooked in a pouch meals which aren't dehydrated - if you have the means of carrying a pot large enough to fit a pouch in with some water to heat them, they are 300% better. Lamb shanks and mash - yeah baby!!
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Follow Up By: Member - Broodie H3 - Tuesday, Jun 11, 2013 at 17:53

Tuesday, Jun 11, 2013 at 17:53
Thanks for that gbc, How was the Noosa river peaceful and quiet I hope, I am hoping to take the grand sons up there once we get over there in two weeks, Borrow the brother in laws kayaks and go and have some fun after the relly bash. getting back on topic I have spoken to my brother in law that is travelling with me and we have decided on the cans and the camp fire, with a nice red to wash it down with. God were are domesticated now it used to be two cartons around the camp fire and a cold coke in the morning, to get you started LOL. but once again thank you for your input.
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Follow Up By: gbc - Wednesday, Jun 12, 2013 at 05:46

Wednesday, Jun 12, 2013 at 05:46
Yes its a special place. I don't know if you know the area, but if you can take the dirt track into Harry's hut it will cut 20 k.m. and two lake crossings off your paddle trip. There's still 22 k.m. from Harry's to the furtherest campsite. You need to prebook a numbered campsite now as well, so if you need a hand sorting any of it out just post a follow up here any time and I'll get it.
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Follow Up By: Member - Broodie H3 - Wednesday, Jun 12, 2013 at 10:09

Wednesday, Jun 12, 2013 at 10:09
Thanks for that GBC,
Your reply dead heated with the brother in law in Queensland, and you both have said the same thing. this is spooky. thank you for sharing. he is going to organise the over night camp permit for us , thank you very much for the offer.
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