Driver Skills.

Submitted: Wednesday, Feb 04, 2004 at 16:31
ThreadID: 10271 Views:2419 Replies:11 FollowUps:1
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Hi,
I was wondering what skills make a fourwheel driver a good fourwheel driver. I'm aware of judgement and the ability to realise one capabilities. But what makes one driver better than the other, I.E Why is it that say, I get bogged in my car on a particular section yet someone more experinced can jump in and make it with no dramas. No tyre pressure or any difference to the car, just changing the nut behind the wheel.
Is it just a matter of wheel placement and engine revs?
I'm not concerned with the fact people can drive a car better than me I just don't seem to be able to pick the difference between two drivers (apart from the fact one is real good at getting bogged and the other slightly less so - in the same vehicle!)
Cheers,
Justin
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Reply By: Member - jtb - Wednesday, Feb 04, 2004 at 16:47

Wednesday, Feb 04, 2004 at 16:47
HI JUSTIN I THINK IT IS JUST COMMON SENSE & PATIENCE. IF U ARE FIRST VEHICLE ON A TRAIL U HAVE A DISADVANTAGE MANY FACTORS CHEERSrather be fishing
AnswerID: 45443

Reply By: Big Trev - Wednesday, Feb 04, 2004 at 17:39

Wednesday, Feb 04, 2004 at 17:39
Know your limits

Know the limits of the vehicle

EXPERIENCE.
AnswerID: 45452

Reply By: Member -Bob & Lex (Sydney) - Wednesday, Feb 04, 2004 at 17:41

Wednesday, Feb 04, 2004 at 17:41
Its mainly experience & as you say wheel placement & vehicle speed. If you hav'nt done a driver training course then do one it made my life easier & iv'e been a trucky for 35years & driven most things in most places but i still learned a few things.Regards Bob
Where to next
AnswerID: 45453

Reply By: bazza - Wednesday, Feb 04, 2004 at 20:04

Wednesday, Feb 04, 2004 at 20:04
g'day
nice & slow - easy does it .
only few times that u have to put the foot down .
also "slow" gives your passengers a more comfortable ride and they will appreciate it more being out in the bush.
however bottom line IS - do a 4x4 course - tis a must. check magazines/website for a experienced instructor/s. might seem/sound expensive but when you are alone out in bush you want to protect yourself and your vehicle.
AND KEEP AWAY FROM SAND & SEASHORES . quickest way to ruin your pride & joy.
'appy 4wheeling - its a big beautiful country tis OUR country.
AnswerID: 45465

Reply By: Willem - Wednesday, Feb 04, 2004 at 22:23

Wednesday, Feb 04, 2004 at 22:23
Having a feel for it and knowing when to quit....all this generally comes with experience.

As said before...take it easy out bush.

Know your vehicle
Drive gently through mud and water
Drive carefully over rocks
Drive with momentum on sand
Drive with care on bush tracks

Driver Training could give you some pointers and set you on the right course but mostly it is trial and error.

Cheers,

Willem

1958 Patrol Pretty flash eh?
AnswerID: 45486

Follow Up By: Russ - Wednesday, Feb 04, 2004 at 23:49

Wednesday, Feb 04, 2004 at 23:49
Very good synopsis Willem.

I add, never give up. You can do it.

RussT
0
FollowupID: 307587

Reply By: Ralph2 - Wednesday, Feb 04, 2004 at 22:48

Wednesday, Feb 04, 2004 at 22:48
Justin, To sum it up mate its reading the terain and knowing how to handle it, which comes with experince and know how.
AnswerID: 45492

Reply By: Eric Experience. - Wednesday, Feb 04, 2004 at 23:10

Wednesday, Feb 04, 2004 at 23:10
Justin.
To answer your specific question about getting bogged, the trick is to apply power when you have grip and back of imediately when you loose it, that way momentum will carry you through and you wont dig yourself in. Practice within walking distance of help. Eric.
AnswerID: 45503

Reply By: ross - Thursday, Feb 05, 2004 at 00:01

Thursday, Feb 05, 2004 at 00:01
"I.E Why is it that say, I get bogged in my car on a particular section yet someone more experinced can jump in and make it with no dramas. No tyre pressure or any difference to the car, just changing the nut behind the wheel."
Is it just a matter of wheel placement and engine revs?

Yes and its also tyre tread,the right momentum,staying calm under pressure and a thousand other little things and above all experience and a bit of luck.There is no one definative reason why. That gives it the element of the unknown that all makes it worthwhile.If you knew exactly your limit and the vehicles limit right down to the last T,then it would be boring.
One of the most thrilling things about offroading is making it over a rough patch that really tests person and machine.Another skill not mentioned so far is the one about vehicle recovery for those days when your confidence exceeded your skills:)
AnswerID: 45509

Reply By: Justin - Thursday, Feb 05, 2004 at 10:41

Thursday, Feb 05, 2004 at 10:41
Thanks for all the replies.
Practice, practice practice seems the order of the day, coupled with a big dose of common sense.
Cheers,
Justin
AnswerID: 45534

Reply By: Mal58 - Thursday, Feb 05, 2004 at 12:12

Thursday, Feb 05, 2004 at 12:12
Justin,
In addition to the other good comments,
One thing, I have learnt is, if in doubt, (stop the vehichle in a safe spot), get out, and walk the track where it looks difficult.

Check the depth of any creeks, bog holes, muddy patches, ruts, steep inclines / declines, sandy patches etc and determine the path or line that you will need to take.

Get your passengers (or drivers of other vehicles) to help as well.

Cheers,
Mal58
AnswerID: 45538

Reply By: Member - Peter (York) - Thursday, Feb 05, 2004 at 15:04

Thursday, Feb 05, 2004 at 15:04
You have to get bogged now and then with the wife in the 4x4 to justify the new winch ,straps , portable track ,shackels , air bag ,AT tyres ,high lift ,upgraded suspention ,snorkel etc and then you can say "if I had these things we would be home by now" .You will never stop learning only the dumb think they know it all.99 GU Patrol 4.2 TD
Peter York 4x4
Whiskey 4501
AnswerID: 45551

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