Anderson weight distribution system

Submitted: Tuesday, Jun 11, 2013 at 09:41
ThreadID: 102713 Views:1331 Replies:3 FollowUps:1
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Has anyone fitted and been using the Anderson weight distribution system. It is the relatively new system form the USA and uses chains under tension rather then the spring steel bar on most other systems. I am interested in feed back from any users.

Maxum11
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Reply By: Member - Frank P (NSW) - Tuesday, Jun 11, 2013 at 10:09

Tuesday, Jun 11, 2013 at 10:09
The video on their website looks interesting.

FrankP

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Reply By: member - mazcan - Tuesday, Jun 11, 2013 at 13:33

Tuesday, Jun 11, 2013 at 13:33
hi maxum11
no
but I watched the 2 videos
very interesting invention
but it mentioned in one video after 13 thousandmiles the zinc coating on the tow-ball still didn't show any signs of wearing
imho I don't think that represents a real trial
if they had of said after 200-300 th mls it might be more convincing
there are a lot of forces applies by it to a few small parts to transfer the weight and the t/ball is encased by a tapered sleeve made out of truck brake lining material which will in my opinion eventually wear
i'm not condeming it but hesitate on the side of caution
and just think I wouldn't buy one until someone else gives it a much longer trial and under aussie conditions as well
the yanks are known to be convincing when trying to sell something ??
cheers
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Reply By: Ross M - Tuesday, Jun 11, 2013 at 18:44

Tuesday, Jun 11, 2013 at 18:44
The spring steel bar works in a different way to whatever this thing does.

I can see it may reduce sway by the inclusion of a friction element in the ball unit but as for weight transference it is very hard to imagine how it is anywhere near as effective as the original spring bars used.
To provide any appreciable weight transfer the chains would have to be under immense tension loading. To do that the side bolted plates would be forced at an angle on the chassis so the bolts were forced to lock onto the chassis before any weight transfer happened.

I would want to see how it weight transferred long before ever considering to buy one.
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Follow Up By: Member - Frank P (NSW) - Tuesday, Jun 11, 2013 at 20:44

Tuesday, Jun 11, 2013 at 20:44
Ross,

As far as I can tell, the conventional springy bars are replaced by compressible urethane bushes at the trailer end of the chains to give the "spring".

I tend to think that there would be less pitching articulation with those than with the conventional bar set-up we are familiar with. They'd probably be good on flat roads, but I'd like to see user feedback when it comes to the kind of dry creek crossings and floodway dips we see on our outbak and country roads.

Are our outback/country roads all that different from the Yanks' equivqlent? I'm thinking not so the thing should be ok, but I'd like some verification, as would the OP.

Cheers
FrankP

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