Rain into snorkel

Submitted: Monday, Jun 17, 2013 at 10:24
ThreadID: 102809 Views:4929 Replies:11 FollowUps:6
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Dumb question I now. But what happens to all the water that goes down the snorkel when you're motoring at highway speeds through heavy rain?
How come it doesn't do any damage to the engine. Or does it?
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Reply By: Member - Frank P (NSW) - Monday, Jun 17, 2013 at 11:48

Monday, Jun 17, 2013 at 11:48
G'day Keith,

The wet airstream goes into the airbox before the air filter where the water falls to a drain equipped with a 1-way valve of some kind (so that if the airbox is immersed, eg in a water crossing, the water can't get into the airbox and fill it.)

I have heard that some vehicles have only a drain hole and no one way valve.

On my Prado it's a rubber valve, I believe referred to as a duck-bill valve. They should be regularly inspected and cleaned at filter replacement time as the opening can get jammed open with rubbish. Something that most service departments ignore.

Cheers
FrankP

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Follow Up By: member - mazcan - Monday, Jun 17, 2013 at 13:39

Monday, Jun 17, 2013 at 13:39
hi robin
you just had to put ya foot in it didn't you

looks a bit like the head of a python lol
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Reply By: Robin Miller - Monday, Jun 17, 2013 at 12:06

Monday, Jun 17, 2013 at 12:06
I have been examining the whole snorkel thing Keith as I am trying to design a better system.

While at first they appear to have some advantages, sort of like speed cameras, when
you look at the total picture things are not quite so black and white.

My petrol patrol - and probably most others have a much more sophisticated water management system than you imagine and while rated to 700mm water they will actually take a pulse input water level of over a metre.

My Patrols airbox for instant spins the air from inlet and at bottom of the airbox is a rubber fitting that essentially drops water.
Its effectivily the one way valve Frank mentioned above.
It also has a plastic moulded pipe from the mudguard to the air inlet which has a 1Lt cavity below it so that the heavier than air water entering is diverted to this cavity and further prevents water
getting to airbox.

So even if a snorkel has inadequate water outlets then water is trapped by cars system.

However from what I have seen of snorkel installations the fitting from snorkel into cars air inlet is often not sealed and I suspect that what really happens is that water can leak out and hence will not build up - could this be a good thing ?

The question to be sure of is that if your snorkel is made water tight - then you had
better be sure of the downstream water removal.

Attached is a picture of Patrol airbox showing a rubber fitting at base to dump water post snorkel.

Second picture is a chance photo of Super Patrol just as sand spun up from its front wheel is about to enter snorkel.

The car would have been better off with a standard inlet.











Robin Miller

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Follow Up By: Member - Broodie H3 - Monday, Jun 17, 2013 at 12:20

Monday, Jun 17, 2013 at 12:20
Hi Robin, I have always wondered how the sand wound up in the air filter box after some of my fishing trips I had never given the snorkel any credence for filling it up, now I know. Thanks Robin
Broodie H3
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Follow Up By: Ross M - Monday, Jun 17, 2013 at 14:27

Monday, Jun 17, 2013 at 14:27
Stands to reason, if you are going to throw heaps of sand at the air intake then it will be drawn into the airbox.

Same with water into the airbox of a normal intake vehicle during deep water crossings.
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Reply By: Rockape - Monday, Jun 17, 2013 at 12:59

Monday, Jun 17, 2013 at 12:59
The snorkel head has drains, the water is forced to the back of the head and runs out of those drains.

AnswerID: 513258

Reply By: Martin Gladwin - Monday, Jun 17, 2013 at 13:03

Monday, Jun 17, 2013 at 13:03
see here

http://www.exploroz.com/Vehicle/Accessories/Snorkel.aspx
AnswerID: 513259

Reply By: Rangiephil - Monday, Jun 17, 2013 at 13:40

Monday, Jun 17, 2013 at 13:40
So long as you regularly clean the dead bugs , leaves etc out of the drains.
Regards Philip A
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Reply By: Member - KeithB - Monday, Jun 17, 2013 at 13:41

Monday, Jun 17, 2013 at 13:41
Thanks to all. I knew it was a dumb question!
Keith
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Follow Up By: Rockape - Monday, Jun 17, 2013 at 18:06

Monday, Jun 17, 2013 at 18:06
Kieth,
it definitely wasn't a dumb question. Many will now know the answer.
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Reply By: Ross M - Monday, Jun 17, 2013 at 15:27

Monday, Jun 17, 2013 at 15:27
KeithB
All that water which goes into a properly designed and effective snorkel head is/should be separated from the air and air should be the only stuff going down into the airbox. The water is gathered and exits through slots in the snorkel head.

Some are possibly better than others at removing water from the airstream. Of course the guarantee will always protect you anyway, they always do don't they?

Ross M
AnswerID: 513271

Reply By: Hoyks - Monday, Jun 17, 2013 at 16:30

Monday, Jun 17, 2013 at 16:30
The design eliminates most of the water, depending on which manufacturer you get that is.

This is how the Safari head is supposed to work. I have driven in some serious rain and it seems to work. Air box is always dry, which is a good thing as the drain hole is plugged with sealant.

AnswerID: 513277

Reply By: DiscoTourer - Monday, Jun 17, 2013 at 17:18

Monday, Jun 17, 2013 at 17:18
Not dumb at all Keith. For those that don't know...well now they know how they work.
In 35 years since the aframe pillar snorkel was first patented, and have used since then, I have never had water from rain cause any issues....even in the heaviest rain it's minuscule.
Brett...
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Reply By: Member - The old fellow - Monday, Jun 17, 2013 at 18:14

Monday, Jun 17, 2013 at 18:14
Yes Keith the same thought crossed my mind. I fitted a slightly smaller sleeve inside the main part of the inlet pipe so it sat up about 15mm above the top of the inlet pipe without the top cap. When I fitted the top part I made sure that the any water that drained from the top part finished up in the grove formed by the external surface of the sleeve and the inside of the top part The water then drained out of small holes in the top part to outside and did not go down the pipe I hope you can understand the description of my modification but it work extremely well.
Where dust is a problem I fit an oiled foam boot over the air inlet of the snorkel. (Available from Autobarn) You would be amazed how dirty the oiled filter gets.
Cheers
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Reply By: Member - Des Lexic - Monday, Jun 17, 2013 at 20:38

Monday, Jun 17, 2013 at 20:38
An interesting post with some good responses. I live in a desert so lots of rain isn't an issue for me but if I were to travel through heavy rain, what would be the problem with turning the snorkle head around 180 degrees if possible (I have a Safari so I could) or does the air intake rely on air being rammed down the pipe. I also thought that the oil filter would be benificial in keeping out the water as well.
Cheers
Des
AnswerID: 513295

Follow Up By: Rockape - Tuesday, Jun 18, 2013 at 05:32

Tuesday, Jun 18, 2013 at 05:32
Des,
Don't worry about it. The heaviest rain doesn't affect them.

I live and have lived where downpours are quite common with never any ill effects.
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Follow Up By: Member - Frank P (NSW) - Tuesday, Jun 18, 2013 at 10:30

Tuesday, Jun 18, 2013 at 10:30
Hi Des,

Agree with RA.

However, should you ever get snow in your part of the world :-) turning the head around 180 deg is recommended to stop blockage at the intake grille.

Cheers
FrankP

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