CO2 in tyres

Submitted: Friday, Apr 26, 2002 at 00:00
ThreadID: 1033 Views:3145 Replies:10 FollowUps:13
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Anyone out there running co2 in the tyres.I can't be the only one.My 3.5kg liquid CO2 bottle can pump about 26 tyres (265-75-R16) from 0 to 30 psi in less than 10sec each.It helps to be on your way on the really hot day.
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Reply By: slunnie - Friday, Apr 26, 2002 at 00:00

Friday, Apr 26, 2002 at 00:00
You run CO2! Wow, I didn't realise people did that on the street. In my racing days some of the die hards used to run gas (cant recall if it was CO2 or Argon - whatever) to control pressure variation. I have seen some use compressed air tanks, but it didn't work well. Sounds like this set up works well though.
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Reply By: Bill - Friday, Apr 26, 2002 at 00:00

Friday, Apr 26, 2002 at 00:00
Goran, Why would you go to the trouble of using CO2? Air is free and I have absolutely no problems with tyres inflated by air in any conditions! I'd be most interested in hearing your reasons - you said "it helps to be on your way on the really hot day". I don't understand what you mean by that. I know that CO2 doesn't support combustion but I've never had or seen a tyre catch fire. I also know it's heavier than air but I can't for the life of me see how that could be an advantage. Is the plus simply that you can pump 26 tyres in 10 seconds each? My compressor takes about 2 minutes each so I guess there's some advantage if you're in a hurry! How much does a 3.5kg CO2 bottle cost as a matter of interest?
AnswerID: 3155

Follow Up By: Goran - Saturday, Apr 27, 2002 at 00:00

Saturday, Apr 27, 2002 at 00:00
Just the shear speed Bill.Also doesn't cost me anything (i think it would cost about $30 a refill).Very handy for reseting tyre on the rim too.Does it in 5 sec.I have got plenty of room in my Cruiser and it can never break down.When you pump 8 or 12 tyres a day in 50C it helps to have something fast.
Cheers
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Follow Up By: Bill - Saturday, Apr 27, 2002 at 00:00

Saturday, Apr 27, 2002 at 00:00
Oh OK Goran - well if you have to pump that many tyres I see your point! We must use different tyres - I've done over 500,000km in 4wds in the last 12 years - many of those in the Outback and in high country and do you know I've only lowered my pressures once and that was to get over "Big Red" and I've never had a puncture. Come to think of it though I owned a cruiser many years ago with the old grey split rims and I had about 5 punctures/tyre failures in 100,000 kms. Maybe that's the sort of problem you're facing with your cruiser. I always felt it was "undershod" and your idea would have been very useful then.
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Follow Up By: Bill - Saturday, Apr 27, 2002 at 00:00

Saturday, Apr 27, 2002 at 00:00
Oh OK Goran - well if you have to pump that many tyres I see your point! We must use different tyres - I've done over 500,000km in 4wds in the last 12 years - many of those in the Outback and in high country and do you know I've only lowered my pressures once and that was to get over "Big Red" and I've never had a puncture. Come to think of it though I owned a cruiser many years ago with the old grey split rims and I had about 5 punctures/tyre failures in 100,000 kms. Maybe that's the sort of problem you're facing with your cruiser. I always felt it was "undershod" and your idea would have been very useful then.
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Reply By: Paul - Saturday, Apr 27, 2002 at 00:00

Saturday, Apr 27, 2002 at 00:00
What's it cost to rent a bottle??
How tall are they?
Sounds interesting, posibly cheaper than buying a $300 - $400 air compresor.
Thanks
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Follow Up By: Matthew - Saturday, Apr 27, 2002 at 00:00

Saturday, Apr 27, 2002 at 00:00
Paul very interesting reply
26 tyres/bottle.
$30/bottle refill.
10 bottles for $300 = 260tyres.
-wear on your compressor, buying all the fittings and wireing for it to run. I am very interested
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Follow Up By: Fred - Saturday, Apr 27, 2002 at 00:00

Saturday, Apr 27, 2002 at 00:00
I get great service from a truck compressor - clips to the battery terminals and is faster than ARB style built in models - cost about $80!!!
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Follow Up By: Fred - Saturday, Apr 27, 2002 at 00:00

Saturday, Apr 27, 2002 at 00:00
I get great service from a truck compressor - clips to the battery terminals and is faster than ARB style built in models - cost about $80!!! and takes 2 minutes per tyre
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Reply By: Goran - Sunday, Apr 28, 2002 at 00:00

Sunday, Apr 28, 2002 at 00:00
Bill, am running 265-75-R16 tubeles Grandtrack AT1
I do a lot of desert driving and don't have many flats at all.
Here it is guys.Forget about renting the bottle.Mine is fire extinquisher bottle 3.5kg liquid CO2.Rigged with oxy gauge and regulator(wich is a must due to hi pressure)and short hose.
Nothing to it.Try it,you will not beleive
AnswerID: 3167

Reply By: Peter - Sunday, Apr 28, 2002 at 00:00

Sunday, Apr 28, 2002 at 00:00
Goran
Sounds like Bill could do with a Trackcare course if he has done so much travel without dropping tyre pressures.
AnswerID: 3171

Follow Up By: Bill - Tuesday, May 07, 2002 at 00:00

Tuesday, May 07, 2002 at 00:00
Always run about 25psi. You probably run much higher and would consider my tyres deflated. I've done more outback travel in one year than you will do in a lifetime and I certainly care for tracks.
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Reply By: ExplorOz Team - David - Sunday, Apr 28, 2002 at 00:00

Sunday, Apr 28, 2002 at 00:00
Interesting, I often carry a scuba tank which contains enough air to inflate types in a few seconds. If you are a diving type person then this is very easy thing to build. Get a cheap first stage and hose connector. Plug it to a length of hose and gauge/inflator and you are away. Goran you device sounds very similiar however you use co2 instead of air. I may write a feature on air compressors/inflation systems soon and will keep it in mind.Regards David.
AnswerID: 3184

Follow Up By: Goran - Monday, Apr 29, 2002 at 00:00

Monday, Apr 29, 2002 at 00:00
David,if you require the photos of the whole set up and detailed info on the speed i will be happy to provide this for you.I use CO2 mainly because of its stored(liquid)properties.You will get 10 times as much Co2 in the bottle than air.Thats what is really great about it.....ability to pump over 20 tyres before refiling.There are few tricks here however and if anyone is contemplating this get in touch with me for more info......right here on forum.
David the site is great.Good work mate.
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Follow Up By: Goran - Monday, Apr 29, 2002 at 00:00

Monday, Apr 29, 2002 at 00:00
You could run all the power tools in the world of this baby.
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Reply By: alreadytaken69 - Monday, Apr 29, 2002 at 00:00

Monday, Apr 29, 2002 at 00:00
check out www.expeditionexchange.com/powertank/FAQ.htm
AnswerID: 3216

Reply By: Gordon - Tuesday, Apr 30, 2002 at 00:00

Tuesday, Apr 30, 2002 at 00:00
Goran
Here are a few things to be careful of when designing or using pressure tanks (CO2, SCUBA etc.): 1)By law, all presure tanks must be inspected periodically eg SCUBA tanks annually, I don't know how often fire extinguisher tanks must be tested, 2)By law, all pressure tanks must be fitted with a pressure relief device - usually a rupture disk. I had a nasty experience when my SCUBA tank burst its rupture disk at 1.00AM one night - gave me a hell of a scare!! The cause was very hot ambient conditions (Adelaide summer) which heated the tank and increased the pressure. This is something to think about if you're in hot outback conditions - it pays to have another way of inflating tyres. Even though I have an ARB compressor under the bonnet I always carry a hand pump as well because you can't get far on a flat tyre and getting somewhere could be a matter of life or death. 4)A man was killed in the US when a wheel-barrow tyre he was inflating blew apart and he was hit in the chest by part of the rim. There were a number of contributing factors that caused the accident (i)The compressor he was using was not fitted with a pressure regulator (ii)The rate of air deilvery was very fast relative to the size of the tyre. (iii)The tyre was of the split rim design with bolts holding the rim together, (iv)the bolts were rusty. The dangers of 4WD split rims are well documented - they can be fatal also. I use split rims but always take precautions when inflating for the first time after a repair. A fast inflation rate is not recommended for split rims. Cheers.
AnswerID: 3220

Follow Up By: Goran - Tuesday, Apr 30, 2002 at 00:00

Tuesday, Apr 30, 2002 at 00:00
Gordon, all fire extinguishers are equiped with pressure releif devices. I never said that this type of tyre inflation is for everyone. There are people out there that can hurt themselves just by picking their teeth. The rate of air flow is controled with oxy regulator , therefore it is very safe alternative option of inflating your tyres split rims or not. Also it is cheap and fast. Like anything in this world it is not idiot proof.
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Follow Up By: Gordon - Tuesday, Apr 30, 2002 at 00:00

Tuesday, Apr 30, 2002 at 00:00
Goran, you obviously know what you're doing. I just worry about some of the comments I've seen in this forum which just goes to prove there are alot of idiots out there. :-) The other thing I've seen are people that hook up old fire extinguisher tanks (1 or 2) to their ARB compressor outlet. This can provide enough air delivery to run air tools eg impact wrench etc which really speeds up the tyre change as well as inflation. By the way, do you know how often fire extinguisher tanks need to be tested?
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Follow Up By: Bob - Wednesday, May 01, 2002 at 00:00

Wednesday, May 01, 2002 at 00:00
Gordon
I suspect the teperature in Adelaide may have been a coincidence. A temperature change from say 20 C to 40 C is a change from 293 Kelvin to 313 Kelvin. Charles Law states that Pressure is proportional to Temperature (in degrees Kelvin) so a change from from 293 to 313 is about 6% and within the safety limit of the Scuba cylinder (unless it was dangerously over-filled). If it was the temperature then pressure would have peaked during the heat of the day, or when the cylinder was filled.
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Reply By: Alan - Saturday, May 04, 2002 at 00:00

Saturday, May 04, 2002 at 00:00
Goran,I have been looking at a similar system to yours using a standard Co2 bottle but have been unable to source a Co2 regulator that will let more than 4cfm out at best how much in cfm does your oxy regulator do? and at what pressure?
Alan.
AnswerID: 3339

Follow Up By: Goran - Saturday, May 04, 2002 at 00:00

Saturday, May 04, 2002 at 00:00
Al, i use standard oxy regulator, (not acytilene) of the normal oxy cutting set up. When it's set to max. flow it reads ( from memory) about 90 to 95 psi. Regulator is CGI brand.
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Reply By: Alan - Sunday, May 05, 2002 at 00:00

Sunday, May 05, 2002 at 00:00
Goran
Just found the regulator I bought when i got my Co2 bottle having had a look at it its an oxy regulator with a fitting to fit a Co2 bottle which i bought to do home brew but havent started yet I will get some fittings and connect an air line and gauge to it and see how it goes ,this has to be much cheaper than any good quality compressor from memory the secod hand regulator cost $50 and the 9 kg co2 was $37 9kg is probably too big I may have to down size if ever I empty it will let every one know how it goes.
Alan
AnswerID: 3360

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