Seems the earlierV8 cab chassis toyos are suffering resale value??

Submitted: Monday, Aug 19, 2013 at 17:41
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If you have a close look at everything advertised , on the Net, Private, yards ,Whatever, the earlier toyo V8 utes are not holding the good resale value their renound for, Actually the last of the 4.2l Nissan are holding just as good a value.,Surprising but a definite fact,.. There where some niggly problems with Toyota in the earley days of that motor production.. seems it has made a bit of impact along the line,..A fencing contractor I know..who is happy to a point with his,reckons they just don't perform like you would expect, and has had Toyota utes for years.....


Cheers Axle.



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Reply By: fisherPete - Monday, Aug 19, 2013 at 18:27

Monday, Aug 19, 2013 at 18:27
With injector cost of around $900, x 8, If I was thinking of buying one with more then 250000ks I would be bargaining hard to, where as the old 6s where just run in, and total injector cost was only around $1200.
Does anyone know how long these injectors last, if they are good for 500000ks then its not and issue.
Cheers Pete
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Follow Up By: Axle - Monday, Aug 19, 2013 at 18:45

Monday, Aug 19, 2013 at 18:45
G/Day Pete, ...Not sure what the life expectancy is with their injectors But I guess fuel quality would play a big part.

Cheers Axle.
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Follow Up By: Dennis Ellery - Monday, Aug 19, 2013 at 21:08

Monday, Aug 19, 2013 at 21:08
My son destroyed a set of injectors on his Hilux at 70,000ks when he copped a dirty load of fuel.
Repair bill was over $4000.
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Follow Up By: Member - John (Vic) - Monday, Aug 19, 2013 at 21:45

Monday, Aug 19, 2013 at 21:45
New Denso injectors can be bought for $400- and change over reco units from Baileys are around $250- each.
Prices are falling pretty quickly on injectors.

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Follow Up By: Mick O - Monday, Aug 19, 2013 at 22:33

Monday, Aug 19, 2013 at 22:33
Are they producing a specific product for the VDJ78/9 series Big fella?

There are a hell of a lot of 78/79 series Diesel V8's out there which are only 3-5 years old so my theory is that if they recommend replacing the injectors at 200-250K, as more vehicles reach this milestone, the range of products available to service the market should increase and the price drop (it's a nice thought...time will tell I suppose).

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Follow Up By: Member - John (Vic) - Monday, Aug 19, 2013 at 22:42

Monday, Aug 19, 2013 at 22:42
Hey mate, you home now?

LCOOL has a thread running on injectors and list suppliers & pricing.
Baileys Diesel Service has the change over program running.
My understanding is the Baileys program is very good, & a reputable service supplier!
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Follow Up By: Mick O - Monday, Aug 19, 2013 at 22:59

Monday, Aug 19, 2013 at 22:59
Cheers Johnno, yep blew in last night. Got rained out of the Gawler Ranges and the wind coming out of the west was so strong I didn't have the motor turned on from Port Augusta!

Home this week & not back to work till next week. Can you flick me the link to the LCool thread.

Come over for a cuppa.

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Follow Up By: Member - John (Vic) - Monday, Aug 19, 2013 at 23:05

Monday, Aug 19, 2013 at 23:05
Will ring ya tomorrow.

http://www.lcool.org/forum/viewtopic.php?t=28371


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Follow Up By: Best Off Road - Tuesday, Aug 20, 2013 at 12:58

Tuesday, Aug 20, 2013 at 12:58
Long tome poster Robin Miller has for years been posting facts and figures that highlight the case that fuel cost is a very small part of vehicle ownership. That diesels may go further on a fill sounds great on the surface but there are many other factors to take into consideration, such as injectors and dirty fuel and depreciation as detailed here along with finance cost, purchase price, servicing etc.
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Follow Up By: Dennis Ellery - Tuesday, Aug 20, 2013 at 14:25

Tuesday, Aug 20, 2013 at 14:25
You can’t beat a diesel for grunt and durability.
High torque at low revs is such a big advantage – there is no comparison when working them hard - that’s why miners, farmers, off road rescue vehicles etc use them. But for some like yourself a petrol’s good enough.
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Follow Up By: Best Off Road - Tuesday, Aug 20, 2013 at 14:46

Tuesday, Aug 20, 2013 at 14:46
I'm not getting into the diesel vs petrol argument that has been done to death way too many times. I was just pointing out the economics which will vary. Anyone who simply believes diesels are cheaper to run because they use less fuel hasn't evaluated all variables. A prudent person will approach the matter objectively.

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Follow Up By: Dennis Ellery - Tuesday, Aug 20, 2013 at 15:05

Tuesday, Aug 20, 2013 at 15:05
You’re using the wrong mechanic -I have a modern diesel and the wife has a modern petrol vehicle.
There is no difference in their service costs.

If you take it over its life the diesel works out cheaper.
The number crunchers at mining companies, and like that need use the heavier vehicles have sorted all this out.
Resale value is higher, longer motor life, less down time etc.

The resale comparison you were referring to was between two diesels – you used the wrong example.
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Follow Up By: Best Off Road - Tuesday, Aug 20, 2013 at 15:34

Tuesday, Aug 20, 2013 at 15:34
Dennis,

Different types of businesses use particular vehicles based on their cost/profit ratio. To suggest that diesels are cheaper to run because they are used in mines is as absurd as suggesting that petrol vehicles are always cheaper to run because taxis use petrol vehicles.

Any competently run business analyses and assesses their situation and makes an informed decision.

Cheers,

Jim.

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Follow Up By: Dennis Ellery - Tuesday, Aug 20, 2013 at 16:06

Tuesday, Aug 20, 2013 at 16:06
There are lot of business’s, not exclusively mining companies in the Norwest of WA that use diesels because of their durability and better long term costs when used in harsh environments – I am not talking about someone in your situation.
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Follow Up By: fisherPete - Tuesday, Aug 20, 2013 at 19:50

Tuesday, Aug 20, 2013 at 19:50
Dennis yes diesels use to last 500000ks plus, but with modern high performance diesels that is not a reality, most do heads at around 250000 to 300000, at a cost of $4000 to $5000.
Meanwhile petrols are now doing 400000ks plus, especially if all alloy. You can rebuild a petrol for the same price as a head rebuild on a diesel.
Most mechanics I have spoken to agree the age of the long lived diesel is over.
Shame really as I have a mate with a NA patrol 4.2 with 600000ks up and still going strong.
We run over 200 vehicles at my work, two out of three are petrol, yet 75% of our major expenses are diesels, mainly heads and dirty fuel.
Cheers Pete
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Follow Up By: Best Off Road - Tuesday, Aug 20, 2013 at 20:11

Tuesday, Aug 20, 2013 at 20:11
Two of the older workhorses in my small fleet are Ford sixes running on lpg and both have gone past 250km and still going strong. My mechanic estimates 400km out of each. Only expected cost at some stage is a head gasket at $800.

My XR6 track car needed a new donk recently, I picked up an engine with 114km for $500 plus $500 to fit. That's bloody cheap to keep on the road.

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Follow Up By: Dennis Ellery - Tuesday, Aug 20, 2013 at 21:08

Tuesday, Aug 20, 2013 at 21:08
fisherPete posted:
Dennis yes diesels use to last 500000ks plus, but with modern high performance diesels that is not a reality, most do heads at around 250000 to 300000
Gee fisher what have you been on tonight?
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Follow Up By: Alan S (WA) - Tuesday, Aug 20, 2013 at 21:28

Tuesday, Aug 20, 2013 at 21:28
Another factor in mines choosing diesel light vehicles is convenience in fuel supply. When you have a supply chain to transport, store and dispense millions of litres of diesel, creating another supply system for the small amount of ULP needed for light vehicle use in non-mining is not economical. Hence the standardisation on diesel vehicles.

Alan
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Follow Up By: Alan S (WA) - Tuesday, Aug 20, 2013 at 21:33

Tuesday, Aug 20, 2013 at 21:33
Dennis, sorry I forgot to add to the earlier post, but another reason that in the NW that diesel vehicles were use was fuel availability, every thing ran on diesel.

Alan
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Follow Up By: fisherPete - Wednesday, Aug 21, 2013 at 06:56

Wednesday, Aug 21, 2013 at 06:56
Dennis I might well ask the same thing, it seems you need to remove the blinkers mate. While I have not heard of sixs doing heads, it seems all the iron block, alloy head fours sooner or later do heads, a lot is to do with diff expansion rates of the two diff metals.
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Reply By: Lyn W3 - Monday, Aug 19, 2013 at 18:31

Monday, Aug 19, 2013 at 18:31
Was at a clearing sale a few weeks ago and a 2007 V8 trayback (221,000km) sold for $21,000. A 2005 4.2 with 240,000km sold for $24,000 both were in similar condition.
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Follow Up By: Axle - Monday, Aug 19, 2013 at 18:49

Monday, Aug 19, 2013 at 18:49
Hi Lyn, ...Just what i'm on about!

Cheers.
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Follow Up By: pop2jocem - Monday, Aug 19, 2013 at 19:40

Monday, Aug 19, 2013 at 19:40
Was the 2005 4.2 a Nissan or a Toyota and turbo or non turbo?
The reason I ask is that the 1HD-FTE turbo cruiser were holding price better than the V8.
Talking to a sales guy at the local Toyota dealer and it sounds like the 70 series is not going to be around much longer anyway. The new HI-Lux is due soon and the towing has been upgraded to 3000 kg along with 5 star safety rating.

Cheers
Pop
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Follow Up By: Dennis Ellery - Monday, Aug 19, 2013 at 21:03

Monday, Aug 19, 2013 at 21:03
I’ll bet on the 70 series being around for a while yet – what are you going to replace it with?
Upgraded or not the Hilux is a much lighter vehicle – and their injectors are no less expensive – it’s just they only have 4 instead of 8.
For the dreamers wishing for the old mechanical injectors – you are living in the past.
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Follow Up By: Axle - Monday, Aug 19, 2013 at 21:18

Monday, Aug 19, 2013 at 21:18
May The Landrovers carry on that tradition."..lol.
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Follow Up By: Lyn W3 - Monday, Aug 19, 2013 at 22:50

Monday, Aug 19, 2013 at 22:50
Pop, it was a Toyota 4.2 Turbo.

The 70 series was also a lot more difficult to sell with bidding starting at $5,000 whereas the older 4.2 started at $10,000 and was a pretty easy sell. The auctioneer earned their commission selling the 70 series $250 and then $100 bids.
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Follow Up By: mountainman - Tuesday, Aug 20, 2013 at 00:30

Tuesday, Aug 20, 2013 at 00:30
no mention from Toyota about discontinue the 70series.
its staying around for a while yet.

the 5 ancap stuff is mining related..
vehicles have to be ancap 5 rated.. in very near future..

the dualcab cruiser, or any 70series is getting in on a grandfather clause with the mines.
they will be getting the hilux.

cruiser remains as is.
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Follow Up By: AlbyNSW - Tuesday, Aug 20, 2013 at 04:12

Tuesday, Aug 20, 2013 at 04:12
Would the reason the 4.2 was easier to sell at the auction be because they are harder to come by now compared to the V8?
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Follow Up By: get outmore - Wednesday, Aug 21, 2013 at 07:01

Wednesday, Aug 21, 2013 at 07:01
You can't run anything on petrol in an underground mine
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Follow Up By: Member - Boobook - Wednesday, Aug 21, 2013 at 07:31

Wednesday, Aug 21, 2013 at 07:31
Lyn, I used to frequent Auction houses, and you would be amazed at the disparity in prices.

I regularly saw 4wds and station wagons go for more than identical vehicles with less km and better condition.

Watch the dealers sit back and shake their heads at some of the purchases. You need to watch a trend at clearance centres and really understand the history and condition to use it as a guide to pricing.
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Follow Up By: Lyn W3 - Wednesday, Aug 21, 2013 at 07:31

Wednesday, Aug 21, 2013 at 07:31
Both the Landcruisers which sold at the Clearing Sale I was at were station vehicles and had never seen a mine site.
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Follow Up By: Member - Boobook - Wednesday, Aug 21, 2013 at 08:25

Wednesday, Aug 21, 2013 at 08:25
Lyn, I am sure that is true, but one sparrow doesn't make a spring.

While there are discrepancies in individual cars from Redbook, it is as good a reference as any, with over 100,000's of vehicles as input as opposed to 2.

2007 V8

2006 4.2 turbo

Though I am sure you will even find some 2003 models for more than say some 2008 models, this surely represents an industry wide trend.
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Reply By: Member - John (Vic) - Monday, Aug 19, 2013 at 21:51

Monday, Aug 19, 2013 at 21:51
Your talking utes that are now 6 plus years old with relatively high K's.
Cars lose 50% of their value in the first 3 years as a pretty good general rule.
$65K 6 years ago, $33K in 2010 so low to mid $20's for a ute is probably pretty reasonable pending its condition.


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Reply By: get outmore - Tuesday, Aug 20, 2013 at 01:12

Tuesday, Aug 20, 2013 at 01:12
Ha ha thats a silly post
With the end of thr current mining boom alot of tojos went off to auction
And were tarted up for quick sale through the yards
So go buy one if you think there cheap. .....
Good quality privatly owned ones will still be fetching decent coin
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Reply By: Member - Boobook - Tuesday, Aug 20, 2013 at 06:59

Tuesday, Aug 20, 2013 at 06:59
There are lots of ex mine 70 series now coming off their lease and on the market. Cheap and cheerful.....

Check the previous owner carefully. It could be a mine, contractor or facilites company.
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Follow Up By: Member - Rosco from way back - Tuesday, Aug 20, 2013 at 09:09

Tuesday, Aug 20, 2013 at 09:09
Interesting options with ex-mine vehicles. Obviously some would not be worth two bob, but not all.

As an example, my step son works for one of the support operations on a Santos site and all of their vehicles are remotely monitored for speed and driver behaviour. They cop a serious slapping if they depart from the rigidly enforced speed limits and driving styles.

So .... assuming they are well serviced (which I believe to be the case) they could well be a good buy if you were in the market.
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Follow Up By: Member - Boobook - Tuesday, Aug 20, 2013 at 09:13

Tuesday, Aug 20, 2013 at 09:13
Absolutely, my friend was the only person to have ever driven a 2006 100 series GXL He is the sort of person who really takes care of things. When it went for sale after 4 years and under 100kms he indicated he was interested he got it for $35,000. It was like new.
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Reply By: olcoolone - Tuesday, Aug 20, 2013 at 09:17

Tuesday, Aug 20, 2013 at 09:17
It comes down to prior history of the vehicle, many Toyota's are used in the mining industry and hence why so many sell cheap.
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Reply By: The Landy - Tuesday, Aug 20, 2013 at 11:54

Tuesday, Aug 20, 2013 at 11:54
Ultimately, depreciation (resale) is one factor in the overall cost of a vehicle.

Another factor will be the value of the Australian dollar, bear in mind we have enjoyed a currency that has appreciated against the US dollar to above parity, and against the Yen it has also appreciated.

That has now changed, and it has fallen in excess of 15% over the past few months against the US dollar, and similar against the Yen. This change in value of the currency will eventually be reflected in the imported cost of new vehicles, and I suspect this can have an influence on the resale price of vehicles, especially if the landed cost of new vehicles is going up.

But in reality, how many people buy vehicles with resale in mind, unless you are turning them over at a regular rate?

Yes, nice to know it holds its value, but there are so many other factors that might influence a vehicle purchase, including running costs over its useful life...

Vehicles will always be a depreciating asset – all the more reason to get Out and About to make the most of it, that is where its true value lies for many of us!

Cheers...
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Follow Up By: Member - Rosco from way back - Tuesday, Aug 20, 2013 at 14:11

Tuesday, Aug 20, 2013 at 14:11
You're on the money there cobber. Just take a look at the Landy stable as a classic example. Demand for 2nd hand Defenders is strong, which is reflected in their resale value.

Unfortunately the same can't be said about Discos or Rangies. The amount they appear to depreciate is quite scary if you own one or are considering same.
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