tyre pliers etc... damge to tyres...

Submitted: Tuesday, Feb 10, 2004 at 21:28
ThreadID: 10437 Views:15692 Replies:13 FollowUps:5
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ok so here we go.... I have been reading alot about tyre pliers and bead breakers etc...when I recently attended the 4+4 show in Melbourne I spoke to one of the development technicians from BFG. I waited sometime to see this bloke and had a very in depth and long talk about tyres etc. I mentioned tyres bead breakers etc and his comment was that they are only a final and desprate measure. They should only be used if you can afford to write off the tyre. He said they(being BFG) had done tests on these tools and no matter what you do they bend the bead wire around the tyre. This is because the contact point is not large enough and the pressure required too much. Yes it will fit back on but it is in effect no longer safe, and has sa suspect seal around the rim. He said they had even destroyed some tyres which had arrived , because the person doing the packaging had roped the tyres down too tight and bent the bead wire around the rim. He further said that it didn't matter how hard they tried they couldn,t get the bead wire back to perfect again. After talking with this bloke there id NO WAY I would use any of these products. Yes argue if you wish but this was a devlopment tech and he knew his stuff..... and to those on the attack... yes if I was stuck etc I would use anything of course.... but the point is it,s a throw away thing for the tyre afterwards. are there better alternatives. And it makes you ponder how many suspect tyres are out there going round.....Uther
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Reply By: Member - Wayne - Tuesday, Feb 10, 2004 at 21:44

Tuesday, Feb 10, 2004 at 21:44
Have been using tyre pliers for years. However only to remove tyres that are no longer with us. If the tyre pliers are used the way the instructions say Do'nt take a big bight when moving around the rim and do'nt try to get it off in one go I can not see a big problem. What about replacing the tyre with tyre leavers? Would not that also bend the bead wire. All the tyre places I have seen still use a tyre lever on the machine to re-fit a tyre.

Wayne
AnswerID: 46233

Reply By: basecamp15 - Tuesday, Feb 10, 2004 at 21:45

Tuesday, Feb 10, 2004 at 21:45
Very interesting post. I'm glad now that I've simply decided to take my spares on rims ready to go, stuff the extra weight.
AnswerID: 46234

Reply By: Diamond(due to duck season) - Tuesday, Feb 10, 2004 at 21:55

Tuesday, Feb 10, 2004 at 21:55
He said they(being BFG) had done tests on these tools and no matter what you do they bend the bead wire around the tyre.
geez theese bfg sound like a great tyre.
i might trade in the coopers lololol.
cheers due to duck season coming
ive decided to hide out
love jemima puddle duck
back after the season
AnswerID: 46237

Reply By: Ralph2 - Tuesday, Feb 10, 2004 at 22:14

Tuesday, Feb 10, 2004 at 22:14
Tyre Pliers etc have been around for many years now and thousands of tyres must have been repaired using them, if this was a big safety issue I think by now we would have heard plenty about it. Maybe if we used them on a F1 race car there would be problems, perhaps the bead wire dosnt have to be perfect, the tyre still reinflates and holds pressure.
AnswerID: 46241

Reply By: Truckster (Vic) - Tuesday, Feb 10, 2004 at 22:30

Tuesday, Feb 10, 2004 at 22:30
he was talking out of his arse.

as others ahve said, you would have heard about it by now.

if your unsure about it, you can always drive SLOWLY over the tire next to the rim to pop it off the bead... done that before it works well.
AnswerID: 46245

Reply By: Member - StevenL - Tuesday, Feb 10, 2004 at 22:35

Tuesday, Feb 10, 2004 at 22:35
Correct me if wrong but if you look at the hydraulic machines at the tyre places they use a press with a head that applies pressure on about 6-8 inches of the bead around the rim to break it where as the tyre pliers use a point about an inch wide. In one 4x4 mag they said that if you don't have tyre pliers you can just drive the vehicle up onto the flat tyre lying on the ground to break the bead or you can place the tyre under the car and use a bottle jack placed on the tyre to do the job.

They say it is a bit more hard work but each of these methods might be a bit less harmful to the bead wire as they would spread the load out across the tyre a bit more?

StevenLPlaydoe GXL TD Manual
It's on order, Delivery in April '04.
This pic will have to do till then. Can't wait!!!
AnswerID: 46246

Reply By: Member - George (WA) - Tuesday, Feb 10, 2004 at 22:54

Tuesday, Feb 10, 2004 at 22:54
If you use tubeless tyres, I would always insert a tube after the tyre has punctured.
I don't trust tubless repairs out in the field.
Have used Tyre pliers now for about 8 years and have never had a problem, but always inserted a tube after the first puncture.
This also overcomes any concerns about possible bend bead wiresKing Edward River, Mitchell Plateau
VKS-737, ch 2, sel. 2131
AnswerID: 46249

Follow Up By: Member - Ray - Wednesday, Feb 11, 2004 at 00:34

Wednesday, Feb 11, 2004 at 00:34
Tyreliers are too hard to use as you get older. R&R Beadbreaker is a great tool.Easy to use and NO tyre damage.The BFG guy is obviously just a salesman.
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FollowupID: 308155

Follow Up By: Member - George (WA) - Wednesday, Feb 11, 2004 at 00:47

Wednesday, Feb 11, 2004 at 00:47
C'on Ray, How old are you---98King Edward River, Mitchell Plateau
VKS-737, ch 2, sel. 2131
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FollowupID: 308159

Follow Up By: Foss - Wednesday, Feb 11, 2004 at 17:05

Wednesday, Feb 11, 2004 at 17:05
I agree, the R&R bead breaker is superior in operational effort and does no damage to the bead or tyre. Used mine a few times, never done any damage. As Ray says and IMHO it's easier tool to use.

cheers

Foss
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FollowupID: 308230

Reply By: Member - Captain (WA) - Wednesday, Feb 11, 2004 at 01:36

Wednesday, Feb 11, 2004 at 01:36
I use a highlift jack with a homemade bead breaker on the base. This device is simply a curved bit of 20mm flat bar approx 6 inches long and bent to the same radius as the rim. Another bit of "L" shaped flat bar is welded to allow it to be attached to the base of the hilift.

I simply put the tyre under the roo bar and jack up the "car". The attachment applies pressure directly on the bead at the rim, but spread out over the 6'. I have used this many times and it works a treat, the bead does not have any type of kink.

I saw this it years ago at ARB or somewhere and simply made my own, decided the ~$50 for a bit of bent flat bar was over the top. As I carry a high lift, the bead breaker attachment is much smaller than the tyre plier types and best of all it cost nothing but time and effort.

Cheers

Mark Mark
Nissan 2003 GU 3.0TD
AnswerID: 46267

Reply By: desray - Wednesday, Feb 11, 2004 at 02:01

Wednesday, Feb 11, 2004 at 02:01
The tyre Pliers are a very old way of taking the tyres off , not a new idea. I used to work in a garage in the 50/60s and used the tyre pliers all the time,before the fancy tyre machines were made. We did not have a problem bending beads then.
AnswerID: 46269

Reply By: Coops (Pilbara) - Wednesday, Feb 11, 2004 at 02:09

Wednesday, Feb 11, 2004 at 02:09
Your guy was from BFG and from what I've experienced and been reading lately, they don't know a whole lot about tyresCheers 'n' Beers
AnswerID: 46272

Reply By: Wazza (Vic) - Wednesday, Feb 11, 2004 at 08:12

Wednesday, Feb 11, 2004 at 08:12
You could always have a crack at this method. If it works, it works. Cheap too.

Phil's RHS Beadbreaker

Wazza~
AnswerID: 46281

Follow Up By: Member - Des Lexik(SA) - Wednesday, Feb 11, 2004 at 17:30

Wednesday, Feb 11, 2004 at 17:30
Thanks Wazza A good idea and easy to make.Dare to Lead not to Follow
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FollowupID: 308235

Reply By: StephenF - Wednesday, Feb 11, 2004 at 09:50

Wednesday, Feb 11, 2004 at 09:50
It's amusing to watch how all the armchair experts react when their beliefs are challenged by someone who might actually know what they're talking about. I know a lot about a few things, but very little about most things, so I'm happy to listen to (and learn from) someone who knows their subject.

Stephen.
AnswerID: 46293

Follow Up By: uther - Wednesday, Feb 11, 2004 at 21:53

Wednesday, Feb 11, 2004 at 21:53
Yes Stephen I agree about armchair experts, (Don,t you truckster??) The bloke I spoke to has been a senior development tech with BFG for 34 yrs. He had nothing to prove and I never promised to buy anything from him... he showed me cut cross sections of tyres and various other things which proved his point. I have been around a lot in well over half a century. I can tell if someone is full of it or not. What the hell is wrong with information input from someone with the information and research. If we all had this atitude we would be still be dragging stuff around instead of using the wheel....all 4 of em.....Uther..so here we go.
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FollowupID: 308270

Reply By: Member - Ray - Wednesday, Feb 11, 2004 at 23:26

Wednesday, Feb 11, 2004 at 23:26
No George, Heading to 58 but the knees are shot to sh (buggered ) and the tyrepliers need a lot more physical efort.
AnswerID: 46421

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