More Tyre Questions

Submitted: Monday, Sep 23, 2013 at 09:44
ThreadID: 104442 Views:2056 Replies:9 FollowUps:16
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Hi All, I know the topic of tyres are a bit like fridges, however I have done a quick search of the archive and I still don't have a clear answer.

I have just purchased a 08 workmate Ute, it curently has 235 x 85 x 16 LT tyres on it which will soon need replacing. I've been to a tyre shop and they said go away from the LT tyres to passenger tyres as their cheaper, and I don't need the 8 ply (?) wall for my application (not sure how he knows my application). Just had the feeling I was being sold what they wanted to sell

Whats the concensus should I stay with the LT tyres or go to passenger tyres.

Rgds
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Reply By: Member - Rosco from way back - Monday, Sep 23, 2013 at 10:23

Monday, Sep 23, 2013 at 10:23
G'day Ian

At the end of the day it depends on your proposed usage. Personally I wouldn't as I agree the sidewalls are too soft.
I am in the process of switching over to 265x75 as they are the same width as stock, just slightly higher, which apparently allows the side walls to flex a bit more whilst retaining the stronger side walls. Plus the added benefit a slight increase in ground clearance.
AnswerID: 518626

Follow Up By: Member - Noldi (WA) - Monday, Sep 23, 2013 at 10:39

Monday, Sep 23, 2013 at 10:39
Thanks Rosco, I see they would be around 30mm wider than my 235's, and there still LT tyres? what brand?
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FollowupID: 798527

Follow Up By: Member - Rosco from way back - Monday, Sep 23, 2013 at 11:12

Monday, Sep 23, 2013 at 11:12
I'm talking about BFG AT, which I believe fits the bill .... though I may be wrong.
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Follow Up By: Member - Noldi (WA) - Monday, Sep 23, 2013 at 11:19

Monday, Sep 23, 2013 at 11:19
Thanks Rosco
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Reply By: Rick (S.A.) - Monday, Sep 23, 2013 at 10:26

Monday, Sep 23, 2013 at 10:26
More info needed before a recommendation is made

e.g.
*terrain traversed i.e. percentage of bitumen/good dirt/rough pot holed dirt/corrugates/bad corrugates/sand/sticks/off road with absolutely no tracks ............ and so on.
*all-up weight
* if towing, what is it you are towing & what does it weigh?

LT denotes Light Truck. These tyres have a heavier construction/built tougher & for that reason are generally accepted as a tyre of preference for outback driving

Cheers

AnswerID: 518627

Follow Up By: Member - Noldi (WA) - Monday, Sep 23, 2013 at 10:49

Monday, Sep 23, 2013 at 10:49
Hi Rick, fair call, and a question I was not asked at the tyre shop. I have bought this to replace the Triton, I recently did the Connie Sue (corrugations, stones, rocks, sand, bush) and while I had no problem it was the only one I saw out there in 6 days, all Toyota's and Patrols. we want to start doing more trips like that but would still only be for 4 weeks of the year. I do not tow. I took the ute over the weigh bridge and it came up with 2.6 tonne, I have an aluminum canopy to go on, 100 lt of water a couple of batteries to run a couple of fridges so I guess around 3.1 tonne may be a bit more.
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FollowupID: 798528

Follow Up By: Rick (S.A.) - Monday, Sep 23, 2013 at 11:41

Monday, Sep 23, 2013 at 11:41
Ian,
Sounds similar to the terrain I drive in. Here's some background:

I drive extensively on all the Beadell roads, plus a heap more including the Canning Stock Route. I also drive on station tracks a bit, but do little of the real 'no tracks' driving. I am very wary of anything off track as it's all too easy to put a stake into a tyre.

I run at ~ 3 t and if towing, 3 t + 1.5 t trailer. I have to get from home to the desert, so that means about 50 % of actual km are bitumen. I usually travel with a mate who tows a 2.5 t trailer his Landcruiser. We both now use the same tyre.

I reckon I am very demanding of tyres and am satisfied with anything that lasts over 30,000 km. I still get flats and generally that buggers the tyre but in three years of very tough conditions I have had only one tyre ruined and perhaps 3 punctures. I used to use tyre monitors but they eventually fail and at $ 100 per tyre, are quite expensive.

I vary tyre pressures considerably, according to road surface, load & speed & believe that my tyres are getting many more km as a result.

I only buy LT tyres - except in an emergency, when I'll take the best of what is available.

I have used a few brands and while I quite liked the muddy style (Goodyear) I am not convinced that for my driving they are worth the extra $'s. However, they performed surprisingly well on bitumen, dirt & on sand.

The tyre I can't fault and now use is the LT Bridgestone Dueler A/T D697. (The precursors to these, the D693's and the D694's, were also very dependable). Some tyre sizes have a higher ply rating than others, so go for that if possible.

Hope this helps.

Rick

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FollowupID: 798532

Follow Up By: Member - Noldi (WA) - Monday, Sep 23, 2013 at 12:38

Monday, Sep 23, 2013 at 12:38
Thanks Rick, I will investigate prices, I have had good experiences with Bridgestone, I know I don't do the off road k's you do but geez 30,000k, I'd have a fit :-)
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FollowupID: 798536

Follow Up By: member - mazcan - Tuesday, Sep 24, 2013 at 15:41

Tuesday, Sep 24, 2013 at 15:41
hi noldi
if your weight is 2.6t
I would stay with the 8ply LT construction tyres
as the lite duty tyres wont last long with the thinner side walls with that weight on rough rds/tracks imho
tyres take a hell of a pounding if the tracks are corregated
cheers
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FollowupID: 798601

Follow Up By: Member - Noldi (WA) - Thursday, Sep 26, 2013 at 16:51

Thursday, Sep 26, 2013 at 16:51
Thanks Mazcan, I've come to the same conclusion
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FollowupID: 798665

Reply By: Bazooka - Monday, Sep 23, 2013 at 11:10

Monday, Sep 23, 2013 at 11:10
You haven't told us anything about your truck and how you use it Noldi so the answer's a piece of string. But your tyre man is essentially correct even if you didn't tell him your typical usage - there's little point in "over engineering" as long as the load and speed rating you choose matches your use. Same would apply to running mudders on a vehicle which spends >95% of its time on the black top. There's plenty of info around about the advantages of LT in certain circumstances. It really comes down to peace of mind V pocket.

Here's how I decide on tyres, always after plenty of research online.

- Pick the tyre "style" which best suits your application eg highway, all terrain or mud/aggressive pattern. The answer for most of us appears to be all terrain.

- Pick the load/speed rating to suit, but err on the safety side. In addition I don't consider anything other than LT construction but others will, based on their own needs.

- Choose the size you want remembering that bigger/wider tyres than standard will affect various things on your vehicle (speedo, gearing, engine management settings, suspension, steering).

- Work out the price range you're willing to consider. Scrimping on tyres always seems false economy to me. Even $80 extra for a proven quality tyre works out at less than a cup of coffee a week over the life of the tyres.

- Pick the brands which offer the size you want. I stick with Bridgestone, Yokohama, BFG and one or two others in my deliberations.

- You know 6 months in advance that your tyres need replacement so wait for deals in catalogues or ring around for the best price.

This site is an excellent reference and has very useful tyre surveys.
Tire Rack guides
AnswerID: 518630

Follow Up By: Member - Noldi (WA) - Monday, Sep 23, 2013 at 11:26

Monday, Sep 23, 2013 at 11:26
Hi Bazooka,
I generally go for Bridgestone myself, currently on my third set and have been getting great milage out of them, However I have never considered LT tyres and would not now except he highlighted that I did not need them. Having nothing to do with them before was the trigger for the question.
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FollowupID: 798531

Follow Up By: Bazooka - Monday, Sep 23, 2013 at 14:11

Monday, Sep 23, 2013 at 14:11
Sounds like you have the answer based on your experience to date Ian. If you've done plenty of kms on P tyres in similar conditions without incident and they're recommended for your vehicle/load then the extra comfort and lower cost would more than outweigh the additional strength and load carrying capacity of the LT. The only possible advantage of the LT that I can see in your circumstances - and it's quite iffy because of the range of things which affect tyre wear - is that you MIGHT get slightly better mileage due to less flex/heat build up.

I bought B697 LTs to replace my 694s (good, reliable but unspectacular tyres) primarily because they were on special AND had a free BS fuel card offer as a sweetener, otherwise I'd be on Yoko Geolanders or BFG ATs now.
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FollowupID: 798541

Follow Up By: Member - Noldi (WA) - Monday, Sep 23, 2013 at 14:17

Monday, Sep 23, 2013 at 14:17
Thanks Baz, 10 minutes ago I would have thought so as well, seeing the video comparing of a cross section of a LV to a Passenger tyre tends to make you think
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FollowupID: 798542

Reply By: allein m - Monday, Sep 23, 2013 at 13:42

Monday, Sep 23, 2013 at 13:42
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pZhZZ-apeQ0&list=PLCAC10A1CC0C93134

from
alan whiteing on Bridgestone

http://outbackjoe.com/macho-divertissement/macho-articles/bridgestone-dueler-d694-14000km-review/

out back joe

both are interesting and informative reports of Bridgestone tires
AnswerID: 518636

Follow Up By: Member - Noldi (WA) - Monday, Sep 23, 2013 at 14:19

Monday, Sep 23, 2013 at 14:19
Thanks Al, the video cutaway comparison between the LT and P tyre is a bit of an eye opener
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FollowupID: 798543

Follow Up By: allein m - Monday, Sep 23, 2013 at 14:59

Monday, Sep 23, 2013 at 14:59
yes that is ok I have posted this before and people have found it worth looking at

and the outback joe report is interesting as well

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FollowupID: 798547

Reply By: MEMBER - Darian, SA - Monday, Sep 23, 2013 at 14:12

Monday, Sep 23, 2013 at 14:12
Next time you are at the tyre shop, get hands on with a passenger tyre in your size - those cases can be incredibly thin at the shoulder (the corner of the wall and the tread) ....I'm told thin, highly flexible point aids greatly in dissipation of road vibration - great on the seal, but scary for any gravel roads in my view.
AnswerID: 518638

Follow Up By: Member - Noldi (WA) - Monday, Sep 23, 2013 at 14:21

Monday, Sep 23, 2013 at 14:21
Hi Darian, yep I can see from the video link posted above the difference
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FollowupID: 798544

Reply By: abqaiq - Monday, Sep 23, 2013 at 16:34

Monday, Sep 23, 2013 at 16:34
Yesterday found the Beadell Tours site. Great information on tires - good read on things to know.
Abqaiq
AnswerID: 518648

Follow Up By: allein m - Monday, Sep 23, 2013 at 17:54

Monday, Sep 23, 2013 at 17:54
Beadell Tours site yes they know what they are talking about unlike many of the so called arm chair experts


they have years of experience they were out there when things were so new not many experts like that left these days
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FollowupID: 798566

Reply By: The Bantam - Monday, Sep 23, 2013 at 22:25

Monday, Sep 23, 2013 at 22:25
In general appart from being heavier constructed, light truck tyres will have more tread depth than passenger radials.

Tyre shops have been selling people pasenger tyres where the vehicle originally came with Light trucks......mostly because it lets them undercut the bloke doing the right thing by the customer by fitting light trucks.

I have owned or diven several light commercials over the years that have had pasenger radial fitted......it never works out well.

The front end geometry of commercial vehicles is designed around light truck tyres and they perform best on light truck radials.

every single vehicle I have driven either as a company car or a used car I have baught has been better after being fitted with the correct size light trucks.

One of the vans, we could no keep front tyres on it, till I perswaded the boss to fit light trucks, like it was designed for.

AND all that is before you start loading them up or using them off road.

If it came from the factory with light trucks.....continue with light trucks.

cheers
AnswerID: 518666

Follow Up By: Member - Noldi (WA) - Tuesday, Sep 24, 2013 at 09:03

Tuesday, Sep 24, 2013 at 09:03
Thanks for your experiences Bantam
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FollowupID: 798587

Reply By: Member - John and Val - Tuesday, Sep 24, 2013 at 17:22

Tuesday, Sep 24, 2013 at 17:22
Ian,

Suggest check the tyre type required for your vehicle - usually on the driver's door pillar, or maybe under the bonnet. For a ute of that size you will probably find that LT tyres are specified. If they are, then they are a legal requirement - the vehicle has been approved for use in Australia with LT tyres. While other tyres may well do the job, and maybe do it better, you could have an argument with police and your insurer if you should be using LT tyres but aren't.

Cheers

John
J and V
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AnswerID: 518694

Reply By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Wednesday, Sep 25, 2013 at 17:59

Wednesday, Sep 25, 2013 at 17:59
If you're planning future desert trips with a Landcruiser traytop, then you need LT tyres - Passenger rated tyres don't do well on a well loaded 79series. You'll lose all the savings when you stake the first sidewall of a P rated tyre.
AnswerID: 518732

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