Squeal in engine

Submitted: Sunday, Oct 13, 2013 at 09:22
ThreadID: 104700 Views:8076 Replies:12 FollowUps:6
This Thread has been Archived
Hi all, any ideas on a squeal in a d40 navara, it's 2010 model diesel. It does it when cold, lasts about five minutes. Every time gets service they have been asked to find the problem, each time it's good for a week or so, then returns. Any ideas, or experience with similar problem, would be great, or remedies would be a big help, cheers odog.
Some people want it to happen, some people wish it could happen, others make it happen!

Lifetime Member
My Profile  Send Message

Back Expand Un-Read 0 Moderator

Reply By: desray (WA - Sunday, Oct 13, 2013 at 09:32

Sunday, Oct 13, 2013 at 09:32
Fan belt slipping ,fit a new one. The service guys are probably just spraying CRC or similar on the belt,ok for a week.
AnswerID: 519629

Reply By: baz&pud (tassie) - Sunday, Oct 13, 2013 at 09:35

Sunday, Oct 13, 2013 at 09:35
We had an 80 series Landcruiser some years back with a squeal in the motor, turned out to be the fan belt.
To test, start motor then tip some water over the fan belt, if it is the belt the squeal will disappear in a couple of secs.
Can't remember what we did to stop the squeal permanently.
Hope this helps.
Baz
Go caravaning, life is so much shorter than death.

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Position  Send Message

AnswerID: 519630

Reply By: Odog - Sunday, Oct 13, 2013 at 09:43

Sunday, Oct 13, 2013 at 09:43
Was thinking it would be fan belt, thanks. Put the post up, to see if anyone may have had any more serious dramas, (blocked oil gallery or something like that) thanks guys. Cheers
Some people want it to happen, some people wish it could happen, others make it happen!

Lifetime Member
My Profile  Send Message

AnswerID: 519631

Reply By: olcoolone - Sunday, Oct 13, 2013 at 09:50

Sunday, Oct 13, 2013 at 09:50
Bearing in an idler pulley, the AC compressor or Alternator?????

Take the belt off when cold and turn/spin the pulleys to see what they are like.

And then replace the belt, is the belt worn, cracked or glazed?
AnswerID: 519632

Reply By: Herbal - Sunday, Oct 13, 2013 at 10:24

Sunday, Oct 13, 2013 at 10:24
There is quite a few things that it could be. It seems that most of the possibles have been mentioned.

The only real clue is that it stops after about 5 minutes. That to me sounds like a pully or aircon pump. Often the bearing in aircons are dry and so to are some pullies. If they get dust, oil or grease in them they will squeal for a few minutes when cold.

As mentioned, water is the best thing to use to find it... You don't want to be spraying lubricant on parts that should not be lubricated.

Fill a small spray bottle with water. Start the engine with the bonnet open. Listen for where the squeal is coming from and give it a squirt of water. If the squeal stops, note where you spayed and repeat the process the next day when the engine is nice and cold. There is always a chance that the squeal stopped by it's self and not from the water. If you repeat it, that will confirm if the water did stop it.
AnswerID: 519635

Reply By: Ross M - Sunday, Oct 13, 2013 at 11:49

Sunday, Oct 13, 2013 at 11:49
An alternator is driven by a belt, it outputs a fair amount of energy to the battery, but, after it has recharged/replaced the start current used when starting, the load then goes off the alternator pulley and belt. This major charge typically takes around 5 min.
It is likely the belt has worn and is bottoming in the groove and service people don't notice and just tighten it which makes it drive sort of ok for a while and then goes back to slip.
If it is a multi groove belt 3, 5 or 7 groove it may also be hitting the bottom of it's grooves.
Most people don't look, don't see and because it still has grooves and isn't broken it must be ok, not so.

Possibly not AC related as it would happen intermittently as the AC clutch pulls in and out.
Not power steering as the slip will then be as you turn and make it work.
Cheers
Ross M
AnswerID: 519638

Reply By: Ron N - Sunday, Oct 13, 2013 at 12:32

Sunday, Oct 13, 2013 at 12:32
Odog - You don't say whether your engine belts are regular V-belts or multi-ribbed V-belts - however, I seem to recall the D40 engine uses a serpentine multi-V-ribbed belt, in common with current design.

Belt squeal has been covered pretty well by all the above posters. However, if the belt is a multi-ribbed belt (and particularly a serpentine belt), it's important to remember that these belts need to be tensioned much tighter than a regular V-belt.

The manual should give you the tensioning methods and specs. If the squeal continues to be persistent, you need to examine pulleys for wear and misalignment.
It's not uncommon for alternator mounting bolts to come loose and create pulley misalignment.
Recently-installed belt-driven components may not have been installed properly as well, creating belt squeal.

The Gates website has a lot of good info on troubleshooting belt problems. The search menu will provide more troubleshooting pages.

http://www.gates.com/brochure.cfm?brochure=1026

Cheers - Ron.
AnswerID: 519640

Follow Up By: Ross M - Sunday, Oct 13, 2013 at 18:10

Sunday, Oct 13, 2013 at 18:10
Ron
A multi rib belt has more surface drive area than a V belt, they also wrap further around each of the pulleys, particularly if it used in a serpentine configuration and often they are tensioned by a spring loaded device on an idler. They also provide a mean radius of greater distance from centre to a similar sized pulley V belt system and shouldn't require more tension/tightness than v belts.
Given the flexibility and the above factors is the reason they are commonly used.

Additional tightness will fairly quickly see the demise of water pump bearings and often idlers too.
I would be very careful about the tension.
1
FollowupID: 799829

Follow Up By: Ron N - Sunday, Oct 13, 2013 at 19:34

Sunday, Oct 13, 2013 at 19:34
Ross - All good points - and yes, many serpentine belts use spring tensioning with an idler pulley for belt tension, rather than a screw-up tensioner - but perhaps I should also have mentioned that a weak spring in a tensioning idler pulley, will result in lower belt tension than required, for a serpentine belt, and possibly produce a belt squeal.

Cheers
0
FollowupID: 799837

Follow Up By: Axle - Sunday, Oct 13, 2013 at 20:12

Sunday, Oct 13, 2013 at 20:12
May as well throw my two bobs worth into mechanics corner as well..lol, A failing bearing in a water pump, alternater. tensioner idler,or what ever else is belt driven,(By any type of belt).. can cause a drive belt to squeal...Best idea is to take all belts off and rotate all pulleys by hand, you will pick up any thing that has a rumble or tightness to it, if everything feels good then it narrows it down to belt wear or belt tension,...


Cheers Axle.
0
FollowupID: 799840

Reply By: Shaker - Sunday, Oct 13, 2013 at 12:32

Sunday, Oct 13, 2013 at 12:32
Put some water in a spray bottle & spray the belts with the engine running, if it goes away, check the belt tensions.
AnswerID: 519641

Reply By: Member -Dodger - Sunday, Oct 13, 2013 at 15:41

Sunday, Oct 13, 2013 at 15:41
An old remedy when a belt squealed when starting up was to rub sunlight soap on the belt in the places you can reach, without the motor running of course. Then hit the starter briefly to roll the motor a bit and repeat the process. This lubricates the belt without it loosing grip.

This is after you have done the aformentioned checks and all appears ok.
I used to have a handle on life, but it broke.

Cheers Dodg.

Lifetime Member
My Profile  Send Message

AnswerID: 519647

Reply By: Member - Odog - Sunday, Oct 13, 2013 at 15:53

Sunday, Oct 13, 2013 at 15:53
Thanks to all replies, will narrow it down, maybe next service get new belt put on and see if it stops, in mean time check with the water in the spray bottle. Great feed back. Thanks again, love this site. Cheers
Some people want it to happen, some people wish it could happen, others make it happen!

Lifetime Member
My Profile  Send Message

AnswerID: 519649

Follow Up By: garrycol - Sunday, Oct 13, 2013 at 16:23

Sunday, Oct 13, 2013 at 16:23
SuperCheap sells a green can of squeal stop specifically designed for this problem - you spray on the wear side of the belt and on the pulleys and as it dries it thickens providing grip to the friction surfaces.

When cold load is greatest on the serpentine belt as grease is the various bearings is cold and thick as is the oil in the power steering pump = as these all warm up load decreases on the belt and the noise goes away - nevertheless as mentioned the belt is either worn or not adjusted correctly or both.

Garry
1
FollowupID: 799819

Follow Up By: Ron N - Sunday, Oct 13, 2013 at 19:46

Sunday, Oct 13, 2013 at 19:46
Garrycol - That reminds me of the "good ole days" of flat belt drives on machinery - when we had a tin of tacky goo that was painted on the old flat belts for grip!
Can't recall what was in the stuff now, it's too long ago! I seem to recall it was a bitumenous product.
I can remember the old man had a big tin of it in the 1950's for the flat belt pump drive, that was driven off a big old 27HP Ronaldson Tippett twin!

Cheers, Ron.
0
FollowupID: 799839

Reply By: Member - peter w2 (VIC) - Sunday, Oct 13, 2013 at 17:43

Sunday, Oct 13, 2013 at 17:43
during the week a fellow in Canberra had a squeak in engine bay turned out to be a platypus
AnswerID: 519652

Follow Up By: Member - Odog - Sunday, Oct 13, 2013 at 18:06

Sunday, Oct 13, 2013 at 18:06
Yeah, saw that one coming! Pretty amazing though. Cheers Peter
Some people want it to happen, some people wish it could happen, others make it happen!

Lifetime Member
My Profile  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 799828

Reply By: Echucan Bob - Monday, Oct 14, 2013 at 08:48

Monday, Oct 14, 2013 at 08:48
Broken manifold stud. Squeal is leaking exhaust gas. As engine heats up differential expansion means leak diminishes.

Bob
AnswerID: 519672

Sponsored Links

Popular Products (13)