MegaPulse - Do They really work ?

Submitted: Friday, Feb 13, 2004 at 14:56
ThreadID: 10506 Views:2520 Replies:6 FollowUps:6
This Thread has been Archived
Forumites,
I was checking the electrolyte levels on the second battery in my Dual Battery system and I noticed that there appeared to be a quite a bit of sulphation across the top of the Plates.

This can't be good, and explains the mediocre performance (ie short time before fridge cutting out) I have been getting lately from it. (Thought something was wrong with Fridge).

There is information on the internet that indicates that the sulphation can be reversed to a certain extent by careful charging discharging etc.

However, there is also information that suggests that pulsing the battery with small current can actually disolve the sulphation, and providing there is no mechanical damage, actually restore the battery back to close to new capacity.

One such device that claims to be able to do this is a MegaPulse unit.

MegaPulse

The study mentioned on the Website seems genuine.

But, do they actually work ?

Does anybody here have any experiences (good or bad) that they are prepared to share ?

Cheers,
Mal58
Back Expand Un-Read 0 Moderator

Reply By: GUPatrol - Friday, Feb 13, 2004 at 15:53

Friday, Feb 13, 2004 at 15:53
Mal,

Several people told me it worked, I was scheptical until I tried one on my secondary battery which was sulphated and I wasn't getting much performance out of it, in other words I was ready to replace the battery and I thought why not try the gadget... I might add it was given to me by a friend...
That was two years ago....!

I installed it and it started to take note of the plates colour/aspect everything was OK, sometimes they looked a little bubbly.

The suplhation appears to have dissapeared and the battery is performing fine, (two years after I was first going to replace it).

All in all the battery lasted three years so far (deep cycle) used for fridge and accesories with several deep discharges under its belt...

Will
AnswerID: 46607

Reply By: Member - Ross - Friday, Feb 13, 2004 at 16:19

Friday, Feb 13, 2004 at 16:19
Mal

How many dollars are they asking for??

CheersFidei defensor

Rosco
AnswerID: 46611

Follow Up By: Coops (Pilbara) - Friday, Feb 13, 2004 at 17:24

Friday, Feb 13, 2004 at 17:24
round the $100 mark I believeCheers 'n' Beers
0
FollowupID: 308490

Follow Up By: V8troopie - Friday, Feb 13, 2004 at 18:05

Friday, Feb 13, 2004 at 18:05
You can also build your own if you are a little handy with a soldering iron and familiar with electronic components.
More info here:
www.flex.com/~kalepa/desulf.htm

Klaus
0
FollowupID: 308494

Reply By: Roachie - Friday, Feb 13, 2004 at 17:22

Friday, Feb 13, 2004 at 17:22
Mal, I use one on my camper trailer battery set-up. I had a deep cycle battery in it with the Megapulse on too for quite a while. That battery died on me before xmas and I have now moved the truck's aux battery (and Exide Orbital blue-top) over to the camper. BTW I bought an Exide Extreme for the no.2 on the truck this time around as I don't think I can really justify 3 times the cost of one good battery etc.
I have still hooked up the Megapulse to the Orbital battery, but cannot check for sulphation on the spiral cell, fully sealed unit. I have that battery on almost constant trickle charge, but also keep a 8w flouro light running off it 24/7 too so it has some constant load. So far so good.
I should also add that the Deep Cycle battery used to be my truck auxillary for quite a while to and was over 3 years old when it expired. After reading an article in 4WD Monthly where they interviewed an expert from ARB about the pros and cons of Deep Cycle batteries, I've decided I won't be buying any more of them.
Cheers,
Roachie
AnswerID: 46615

Follow Up By: Rod E B - Sunday, Feb 15, 2004 at 16:40

Sunday, Feb 15, 2004 at 16:40
Roachie ,
your comment

. After reading an article in 4WD Monthly where they interviewed an expert from ARB about the pros and cons of Deep Cycle batteries, I've decided I won't be buying any more of them.

Briefing what did the article say

Or What month was the article in 4WD monthly , to which i do not subscribe.

Rod
0
FollowupID: 308756

Follow Up By: Roachie - Monday, Feb 16, 2004 at 10:27

Monday, Feb 16, 2004 at 10:27
Rod,
I've loaned the mag to a work mate who has now POQ'd to Albury for a couple of weeks (he's working out what dual batteries to put in his Prado V6).
Briefly, the article talked about how, for most of us four wheel drivers, a Deep Cycle battery isn't going to be the best option due to the iregular nature of our usage patterns. The idea seems to be that Deep Cycles are better suited to things like motorised wheel chairs etc (aka: Toyota Landcruisers....hahahaha....just joking...) and other similar uses where there is a sort of constant drain, followed by a lengthy period on a charger to top them up.
However, with most of us, we stick them under the bonnet and use them occasionally to run a fridge etc when we have a once-a-month weekend trip of annual BIG trip away. Some are wired in such a way that they are incorporated into the starting system of the vehicle (not good) and also they may be used to assist power a winch (also not good).
They get shaken about more than they should and their plates are not as robustly mounted as say a dedictated off-road starting type battery, so the word is their internals can fail.
Another school of thought is that you shouldn't mix to different types of batteries on your vehicle as they will receive the charge from the alternator differently etc.
Mate, I'm no expert, but I do tend to read a lot and like most things, it's a matter of trying to make head or tail of people's views and then using all this info to make an informed decision.
Hope this answers your question. If not, let me know and I'll get an email off to my mate, Colin, and get him to email the details of the article.
Cheers,
Roachie
0
FollowupID: 308863

Follow Up By: Rod E B - Monday, Feb 16, 2004 at 13:19

Monday, Feb 16, 2004 at 13:19
Roachie ,

Thanks , the point about the constant drain and the need to fully charge was backed up by a conversation I had with a fellow at " all about 12 volt " a shop in Auburn NSW speacializing in 12 volt gear . His comment about the need to fully charge did not sink in until your reference . I think I may go the way of getting a normal cranking battery and a soliniod set-up , possibly the REDARC system as they are more widely avaliable and easier to replace should I get into trouble . Although the " all about 12 volt shop " impressed me with their "know-how" and helpfulness , i.e making cable from parts to your size etc . Maybe a little more thinking .

Rod
0
FollowupID: 308883

Reply By: Coops (Pilbara) - Friday, Feb 13, 2004 at 17:26

Friday, Feb 13, 2004 at 17:26
Mal
I have a Rotronics battery management system which in effect does the same thing and it's made a great deal of difference to the life of my batteries.
For $100 I'd give it a shot and would have bought one had I not chosen the Rotronics option.Cheers 'n' Beers
AnswerID: 46616

Reply By: milo - Saturday, Feb 14, 2004 at 01:38

Saturday, Feb 14, 2004 at 01:38
Hi Mal58,
The one problem that I had with these is that I had alot of static in my commercial and HF radios.
AnswerID: 46653

Follow Up By: Roachie - Monday, Feb 16, 2004 at 10:33

Monday, Feb 16, 2004 at 10:33
Milo,
I must agree with you there. In fact it was so bad that I put a switch in to enable me to switch the blasted thing off while we are travelling. I now have it mounted on my camper trailer battery.
Cheers,
Roachie
0
FollowupID: 308866

Reply By: Mal58 - Monday, Feb 16, 2004 at 13:37

Monday, Feb 16, 2004 at 13:37
For all the responses with your experiences, (including the bits about HF interference), many thanks.

Being electronically inclined, I think I may have ago at building my own.

Cheers,
Mal58
AnswerID: 46883

Sponsored Links

Popular Products (13)