HF Radio fuse

Hi,
I'm just about to shift my HF radio to another vehicle and I found a 415v 30amp fuse hooked up to the positive side of my 12v battery, not being too clued up in electrics is this normal? it was originally installed by professional people.
Should I replace it with something else?
Thanks in anticipation.
Cheers
Graham
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Reply By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Sunday, Dec 01, 2013 at 17:30

Sunday, Dec 01, 2013 at 17:30
Hi Graham

Use the same fuse. Is it the white ceramic type?


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Follow Up By: Member - Graham N (SA) - Sunday, Dec 01, 2013 at 17:57

Sunday, Dec 01, 2013 at 17:57
Thanks Stephen,
It is a white ceramic fuse, I guess I will need to look around for a spare. It seemed a bit strange to a novice like me.
Thanks again
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Graham
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Reply By: MEMBER - Darian, SA - Sunday, Dec 01, 2013 at 17:47

Sunday, Dec 01, 2013 at 17:47
Best to consult the manufacturer's installation instructions for your particular make and model. The handbook for my Barrett 950 specifies an "HRC rated 25A 240V" fuse in the 12V + cable, as close as practical to the battery end. My fuse is mounted in a bladed cradle that slots into a robust receiver (mounted on the firewall). BTW - the manufacturer expects the battery to deliver current at 13.8V, to gain optimum performance - below this (which would mostly be the case if the engine is off), the signal strength is reduced. The Barrett has a readout facility that can show the voltage applicable to the previous transmission .
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Follow Up By: Member - Graham N (SA) - Sunday, Dec 01, 2013 at 18:02

Sunday, Dec 01, 2013 at 18:02
Thanks Darian,
My Codan NGT appears to sound better when the engine is off, although this may be due to less background noise.
Thanks for your reply
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Graham
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Reply By: get outmore - Sunday, Dec 01, 2013 at 18:38

Sunday, Dec 01, 2013 at 18:38
yes they take a house fuse which has blades either end - not sure what there called but I recall our 70s built house had the same fuses.

a touch harder to find these days but the trick is to go to an electrical store not an automotive store.

couldnt tell you the ratianalle - i would have thought a maxi blade with a decent amp fuse would be as good or better
- perhaps thats why I dont build HF radios?
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Follow Up By: Member - Graham N (SA) - Sunday, Dec 01, 2013 at 20:06

Sunday, Dec 01, 2013 at 20:06
Thanks Get Outmore, the only time I had seen anything like that was in the old narrow gauge NSU engines in the 70s and they seem to blow when we were miles from anywhere.
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Follow Up By: P and JM - Monday, Dec 02, 2013 at 21:44

Monday, Dec 02, 2013 at 21:44
Hi Graham N,

Interesting that you seen these old type fuses on the NSU's, what sections did you operate them over? I used to drive them old buckets around as well as the GM, AL, CL, DL, EL, 500, 600, 700, 830,930,900 Classes.

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Follow Up By: Member - Graham N (SA) - Tuesday, Dec 03, 2013 at 06:45

Tuesday, Dec 03, 2013 at 06:45
Hi P&J
I drove them for the Commonwealth/AN, so I guess you can work out where we were, the only loco's you could fix with a lump of fencing wire.
E-mail me if you like at mgnoryandbigponddotcom

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Graham
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Reply By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Sunday, Dec 01, 2013 at 19:01

Sunday, Dec 01, 2013 at 19:01
Hi Graham,

If it is a white ceramic cylindrical fuse rated at 30 Amp then it will be fine, best you can get in fact. The 415v is the rating of the maximum voltage of the circuit that the fuse should be used in.

It is a HRC fuse normally used in industrial applications. The "HRC" stands for High Rupture Capacity meaning that it is designed for applications where the fault current can be momentarily quite high, possibly several thousand Amps, such as will be experienced in electrical distribution systems with high current source of supply.

In general however, a 30 Amp automotive Maxi fuse will serve just as well in an automotive circuit.
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Follow Up By: Member - Graham N (SA) - Sunday, Dec 01, 2013 at 20:10

Sunday, Dec 01, 2013 at 20:10
Thanks for the explanation Allan looks like I need to keep it in there.
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Reply By: Hairy (NT) - Sunday, Dec 01, 2013 at 20:01

Sunday, Dec 01, 2013 at 20:01
Gday,
I inherited my radio from the old man......and yep....its got a bloody big old house type fuse in it. Its been with me for about 10 years, has never blown and neither has the radio.

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Follow Up By: Member - Graham N (SA) - Sunday, Dec 01, 2013 at 20:15

Sunday, Dec 01, 2013 at 20:15
Thanks Hairy lets hope none of them blow as they maybe hard to find.
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Follow Up By: get outmore - Sunday, Dec 01, 2013 at 22:35

Sunday, Dec 01, 2013 at 22:35
Na not hard to find as I said go to a electrical shop there still far from uncommon in general use. And get a few spares
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Reply By: Member - LeighW - Sunday, Dec 01, 2013 at 22:26

Sunday, Dec 01, 2013 at 22:26
When I installed my Barrett, I just used a standard auto fuse, haven't had any issues using it.

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Reply By: Stone Stomper - Monday, Dec 02, 2013 at 07:59

Monday, Dec 02, 2013 at 07:59
I have just installed our Codan NGT into our 200LC from our Hilux and changed the fuse this time to a Narva Maxi fuse, I have no engine noise this time.

Christian

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Reply By: Member - John and Val - Tuesday, Dec 03, 2013 at 09:22

Tuesday, Dec 03, 2013 at 09:22
Grahame,

The use of these ceramic fuseholders seems not uncommon for this purpose. Why? The only reason I can think of is that the great lump of ceramic might contain the molten fuse wire if it came to a sudden end. Seems to me an automotive type blade fuse or enclosed cartridge type would be contained just as well without occupying so much space. I use blade fuses throughout and the hf radio works just fine. I'd be interested to hear from a major manufacturer just why this practice has developed.

I agree with using a 30A fuse, but why such a monster?

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John
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Follow Up By: Member - LeighW - Tuesday, Dec 03, 2013 at 16:50

Tuesday, Dec 03, 2013 at 16:50
The only reasons I can think of for use of those dinosaurs would be ease of terminating heavy cable, perhaps more reliable and the most likely would be that a lot of these radios are used for base station installs in remote locations and perhaps is more likely that they have this type of fuse holder available than a auto type.

Being a ham radio operator I can't see any technical requirement for the their use in this application.

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Reply By: Member - Frank P (NSW) - Tuesday, Dec 03, 2013 at 17:24

Tuesday, Dec 03, 2013 at 17:24
I am not a fan of automotive blade fuses.

I have had 3 regular sized (not mini or jumbo) fuse holder and fuse assemblies melt while carrying normal operating loads. In each case the max current was 30 or 25 or 6 amps. The fuses were 40, 40 and 10 respectively. In all cases the equipment they were protecting continued to work normally, and the melted fuse assemblies were discovered in routine inspections.

The two high current ones are in a protected area, clean and dry at all times. The 10 amp one is in the engine bay, protected from the elements but subject to engine heat and the occasional engine wash. All have rubber caps, supposedly to keep moisture out.

I replaced the two 40 amp fuses and holders with jumbo assemblies of the same rating. Bugger me, one of them has melted. So now they're being replaced with circuit breakers.

Perhaps the unreliability of consumer quality fuse holders such as mine is why a more industrial type has been chosen for the HF installation.

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Reply By: Member - Graham N (SA) - Wednesday, Dec 04, 2013 at 08:00

Wednesday, Dec 04, 2013 at 08:00
Thanks everyone for your replies it looks like the old adage 'if it ain't broke don't fix it'.
I'll buy a spare but probably should not need it.
Thanks again
Cheers
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Reply By: Member - Graham N (SA) - Wednesday, Dec 04, 2013 at 08:05

Wednesday, Dec 04, 2013 at 08:05
This post has been read by the moderation team and has been moderated due to a breach of The Double-up Post Removed Rule .

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