Driving Melbourne to Perth

Submitted: Monday, Dec 02, 2013 at 08:49
ThreadID: 105342 Views:1568 Replies:6 FollowUps:5
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Hi
We (the Mister and I) are planning to drive to Perth (well, to Mandurah actually to visit family) from Melbourne just after Christmas.

What I am looking for is a book about the trip, with interesting facts about the towns you pass on the way, history, pictures, wildlife, including a map.
Does anyone know of any books like this, ideally it would cover at least the SA and WA sections, if not Victoria too.
I have done internet searches and it seems you can only get small sections, not the whole trip in one book.

I thought I could impress the other half with interesting facts and history to help time pass.

Is this a stupid request?? Should I just write my own book on the way??

There are so many great books about different trips but I cannot find any about the Nullabor.
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Reply By: Herbal - Monday, Dec 02, 2013 at 10:44

Monday, Dec 02, 2013 at 10:44
There is a book called Explore Australia. I think it comes out each year. My copy is 2008. It pretty much covers what you might be looking for.
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Reply By: wizzer73 - Monday, Dec 02, 2013 at 11:17

Monday, Dec 02, 2013 at 11:17
This site may be of interest to you.

nullarbornet

wizzer
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Reply By: Robin Miller - Monday, Dec 02, 2013 at 12:08

Monday, Dec 02, 2013 at 12:08
Across the Nullarbor, an adventurers guide by Ron & Viv Moon , is the one to get Julie, with 4wd tracks as well etc etc

Got mine from Exploroz , covers Port Augusta to Esperance.

Robin Miller

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Follow Up By: Robin Miller - Monday, Dec 02, 2013 at 12:11

Monday, Dec 02, 2013 at 12:11
In case your searching exact title is Across the Bight & Nullarbor.

Nice convient size for driving with to and spiral bound.
Robin Miller

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Follow Up By: Member - Julie B (VIC) - Monday, Dec 02, 2013 at 12:33

Monday, Dec 02, 2013 at 12:33
Oh great, just ordered it,

Thanks
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Reply By: allein m - Monday, Dec 02, 2013 at 12:37

Monday, Dec 02, 2013 at 12:37
facts

some facts
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Follow Up By: allein m - Monday, Dec 02, 2013 at 12:40

Monday, Dec 02, 2013 at 12:40
on the history channel the other day said this

The great ocean road out of Melbourne was made by returned vets of www1 in memory of there mates who did not make it


If that is true it so amazing
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Follow Up By: MUZBRY- Life member(Vic) - Monday, Dec 02, 2013 at 15:20

Monday, Dec 02, 2013 at 15:20
Gday Allein
I am of the understanding , the Great Ocean Road is the biggest war memorial in the world..

Muzbry
Great place to be Mt Blue Rag 27/12/2012

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Follow Up By: allein m - Monday, Dec 02, 2013 at 17:18

Monday, Dec 02, 2013 at 17:18
The Great Ocean Road is an Australian National Heritage listed 243 kilometres (151 mi) stretch of road along the south-eastern coast of Australia between the Victorian cities of Torquay and Allansford. Built by returned soldiers between 1919 and 1932 and dedicated to soldiers killed during World War I, the road is the world's largest war memorial. Winding through varying terrain along the coast and providing access to several prominent landmarks, including the Twelve Apostles limestone stack formations, the road is an important tourist attraction in the region.

ok it is true


Construction effort

Construction on the road began on 19 September 1919, built by approximately 3,000 returned servicemen as a war memorial for fellow servicemen who had been killed in World War I. An advance survey team progressed through dense wilderness at approximately 3 kilometres a month. Construction was done by hand; using explosives, pick and shovel, wheel barrows, and some small machinery,[6][16] and was at times perilous, with several workers killed on the job; the final sections along steep coastal mountains being the most difficult to work on. Anecdotal evidence from ABC archives in 1982 suggested workers would rest detonators on their knees during travel, as it was the softest ride for them.[16]

The soldiers were paid 10 shillings and sixpence for eight hours per day, also working a half-day on Saturdays. They used tents for accommodation throughout, and made use of a communal dining marquee and kitchen; food costing up to 10 shillings a week. Despite the difficulty involved in constructing the road, the workers had access to a piano, gramophone, games, newspapers and magazines at the camps. Additionally, in 1924, the steamboat Casino became stranded near Cape Patton after hitting a reef, forcing it to jettison 500 barrels of beer and 120 cases of spirits. The workers obtained the cargo, resulting in an unscheduled two-week-long drinking break.[20]
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Reply By: jimbo131 - Monday, Dec 02, 2013 at 13:04

Monday, Dec 02, 2013 at 13:04
Another good book on the Nullarbor was published several years ago by Dick Smith's Australian Geographic business. I don't have a copy with me now so can't give exact title and ISBN but a search on Aust Geographic should find it.
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Reply By: Gone Bush (WA) - Monday, Dec 02, 2013 at 15:22

Monday, Dec 02, 2013 at 15:22
Julie,

If you are using some of the campsites in Camps 7, you might find a few of them referred to in my blog.

GB in a BT

You will have to sift through the entries though.

By the way, a beautiful day in Mandurah today. Everything warming up nicely for a good crab season after Xmas.

I'm glad I ain't too scared to be lazy
- Augustus McCrae (Lonesome Dove)

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