Engine Saver

Submitted: Thursday, Dec 05, 2013 at 14:40
ThreadID: 105382 Views:3604 Replies:6 FollowUps:11
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Must be some on here using this product.
Searched but nothing recent came up.
If I'm reading the blurb correctly it looks like a nice 'cover all' gadget - monitoring both coolant levels and engine temperatures. Most other products I've come across seem to do one or the other.
Any report on the Engine Saver product would be appreciated.
Are there any similar products that would be worthwhile looking at?
Just in case it makes a difference vehicle is 100 series petrol Cruiser.
Thanks in advance for any replies.
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Reply By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Thursday, Dec 05, 2013 at 15:03

Thursday, Dec 05, 2013 at 15:03
There have been numerous threads on this forum over time.

Try Googling "Exploroz engine saver" and they will all appear.

For what its worth, I wouldn't leave home without one!
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Allan

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Follow Up By: Krooznalong - Thursday, Dec 05, 2013 at 15:11

Thursday, Dec 05, 2013 at 15:11
Thanks Allan
Searched on here using "engine saver" and didn't see anything more recent than 2010. Would prefer more up to date info than that as sometimes manufacturing is shifted OS and quality suffers. Just wary of old info that's all.

Anyway sound like you're happy with it.
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Thursday, Dec 05, 2013 at 15:56

Thursday, Dec 05, 2013 at 15:56
My suggestion was to search on Google rather than the search function in this forum. You will get more comprehensive results.

When Google has performed the search, click on "Search Tools" then "Any time" where you will be able to set your preferred period.

I actually have a custom-built alarm for both engine block temperature and coolant low level, but there are several Australian manufactured systems available of good construction with differing features.

Some years ago I wrecked an engine due to rapid coolant loss where the OEM instrumentation did not alert me. Which is why I say that I would not now be without one.
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Follow Up By: Kanga1 - Thursday, Dec 05, 2013 at 17:00

Thursday, Dec 05, 2013 at 17:00
Hi, I just fitted the 550 to my new D-Max, previously had the Engine Watchdog in our Troopy. It is comforting to have a device monitoring coolant vitals while you are concentrating on avoiding tyre stakes etc. Great audible alarm. Cheers, Kanga.
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Reply By: Dennis Ellery - Thursday, Dec 05, 2013 at 15:36

Thursday, Dec 05, 2013 at 15:36
I have an Engine Safe EMs500 which is a bit more expensive - but has more monitoring options - see Thread 104675
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Reply By: bluefella - Thursday, Dec 05, 2013 at 15:38

Thursday, Dec 05, 2013 at 15:38
X2 what Allan B said about the engine saver low coolant alarm. I also have a watchdog TM2 to monitor engine temps at the head.
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Follow Up By: Dennis Ellery - Thursday, Dec 05, 2013 at 15:56

Thursday, Dec 05, 2013 at 15:56
The Engine Safe EMS 500 can be set up to monitor both these faults - instead of buying 2 different devices.
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Reply By: Bludge - Thursday, Dec 05, 2013 at 16:40

Thursday, Dec 05, 2013 at 16:40
Another alternative, you could use an Android device, Phone or Tablet with a BlueTooth OBDII transmitter to take all engine readings.

and more Google Play link to software

OBDII transmitters can be brought off eBay for around $20.00 the Android software is free in most cases but a paid for app is between $2 and $5 the OBDII powers up from the diagnostic plus


I utilise my Sony Xperia Z tablet for HEMA mapping, OziExplorer mapping as well as engine management.

As I said, its another method of monitoring and an alternative to buying a specific device.

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Follow Up By: Bludge - Thursday, Dec 05, 2013 at 17:09

Thursday, Dec 05, 2013 at 17:09
Note the software can be switched to metric.. the pics I put up are imperial.

You can also read fault codes and reset and warning lights if needed.

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Follow Up By: bluefella - Thursday, Dec 05, 2013 at 19:25

Thursday, Dec 05, 2013 at 19:25
depends on year model for the cruiser wether it's OBDII compatible.
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Follow Up By: Bludge - Friday, Dec 06, 2013 at 10:51

Friday, Dec 06, 2013 at 10:51
Thanks bluefella, Petrol LC was mentioned. OBDII works on Toyota LC petrol 2002 onward, in the US from 1996 onward all vehicles were required to have OBDII compatibility the Toyota LC 80 petrol was sold there.

Best as always is to ask you local mechanic to were if OBDII works on your model.
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Reply By: Erad - Friday, Dec 06, 2013 at 10:23

Friday, Dec 06, 2013 at 10:23
There are two types of 'Engine Saver' available. One sits inside the top radiator hose and monitors coolant levels and when it gets too hot hopefully brings up an alarm. The other is a thermocouple which is bolted onto the outside of the engine somewhere and watches and displays the temperature.

I see 2 problems with the first choice:
1 If you lose a welsh plug or blow a major hose, the coolant will fall away very quickly and you may miss the event. Once there is no coolant, it won't sense the overheating. (My wife was apsasenger in a car which lost its welsh plug. She alerted the driver and the temp gauge rose slightly, then fell back to lower than normal. No other symptoms other than a bit of water coming from the passenger side hood gap...)
2 Having something electrically connecting the engine to a display could create an earth loop which may induce some stray currents and cause corrosion in the cooling system.

The second choice is the 'Engine Watchdog'(I have this one). It also has flaws. They suggest that you bolt the thermocouple onto the thermostat housing. I had my unit on my old pajero and on that the thermostat was mounted well away from the main part of the engine. Should I lose a welsh plug or burst a main hose, the unit would probably not detect it. I mounted the thermocouple onto an intake manifold stud so that hopefully it would measure directly the rise in the head temperature when a hose burst. That meant that the unit was montoring the intake manifold temperature and when it was cold, it would display anything from 50 to 70 deg C when the coolant was up to temperature. I now have a new diesel Pajero and the unit is bolted onto the thermostat housing as recommended. In both cases, when you stop the engine, there is a heat sink effect in which the indicated temperature rises. OK if the unit is turned off, but it drives me mad when the alarm goes off and the engine is not running. I have set the alarm level just above the heat sink level, but with summer coming on, may have to set it higher.

The choice is yours

I have an OBD monitor as well, which monitors 4 parameters, one of which I have selected as engine coolant. This works well, but does not have an alarm function, so I still need the watchdog. Being on the outside of the thermostat housing, it doesn't accurately monitor the coolant temperature, but is fairly close. Typically, the coolant temp is 85 Deg C and the watchdog shows 81 or if it is hot, maybe 83. I have been towing my caravan and the OBD monitor has shown up to 90 Deg C on a long uphill run, yet the car's temperature gauge barely if at all, so there is a lot of margin left. At that time, th watchdog was showing 84, but it was a cold day at the time. Remember that the car temperature gauge is not linear. From cold (say 25 or 30 deg C) to 85 (middle of the scale) is half of the scale. The top of the scale (red) would be about 110 Deg C, so things move quicker once you get past half way.
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Follow Up By: Member - John (Vic) - Friday, Dec 06, 2013 at 11:26

Friday, Dec 06, 2013 at 11:26
I think we need to be careful when talking about these units.
There is a number of different models avaliable.

The low coolant alarm that is fitted to the top of the radiator is designed to warn of low coolant level and won't "miss the event"
It's not a coolant temperature sensor.

I have run the combined TM2 unit that monitors low coolant levels and engine temps, had it for many years and have transferred it to a number of Troopies, currently installing it into my new GXL Troopy.

The stray current point is a none issue as the unit uses millivolts only, not enough to cause corrosion issues.
Dave Jones no longer sells the combined TM2 unit that I have, he only deals in his low coolant alarm.
His page also discuses the stray current issue.
He's a very good bloke to deal with or to discuss your needs and issues.
No affiliation other than a very satisfied customer.

http://www.enginesaver.com.au/
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Friday, Dec 06, 2013 at 12:39

Friday, Dec 06, 2013 at 12:39
Yes John,

I think Erad is confusing the elements for low level sensing and temperature sensing. The probe inserted at the top radiator hose is usually for sensing low coolant level. However, I agree with him about having an appropriate location for the engine block temperature sensor, although almost anywhere on the block is probably better than sensing coolant temperature in a void which may cease to sense if coolant is lost.

As for stray currents and electrolytic erosion, there are stray electrical currents all over a vehicle including the engine and cooling system due to various volt drops from attached electrics. The few microamps of current used in conductivity-type coolant level alarms is insignificant. Mind you, a probe of this type, if advertised as having dramatically low probe current, may in fact fail to annunciate a low coolant level due to electrical current leakage on the surface of the probe insulator following coolant loss. So some reasonable current is necessary for reliable operation. But the concept of radiator electrolytic erosion remains a popular myth.

And you are right about David Jones of Engine Saver, he is a Top Bloke. The TM2 is still available via a link on David's site.
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Follow Up By: Member - John (Vic) - Friday, Dec 06, 2013 at 12:51

Friday, Dec 06, 2013 at 12:51
Hi Al
Yeah I see the TM2 is a valuable via one of his agents.
But it no longer appears to combine the low coolant alarm with the bolt on temp sensor as one unit, Dave used to have an arrangement with the Engine Watchdog guys from memory.

It just means installing two units, Engine Watchdogs TM2 and Dave's Engine Saver low coolant alarm.
Whether a combined unit or separate they both provide excellent piece of mind and worth the outlay in my view.

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Follow Up By: Member - John (Vic) - Friday, Dec 06, 2013 at 12:54

Friday, Dec 06, 2013 at 12:54
That should read "is avaliable" bloody iPad autocorrect!!!
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Reply By: Member - Bucky - Monday, Dec 09, 2013 at 05:53

Monday, Dec 09, 2013 at 05:53
Had one on the Patrol for almost 3 years
Best thing ever !

Easy to fit
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