Can anybody identify this snake?

Submitted: Saturday, Jan 04, 2014 at 21:32
ThreadID: 105688 Views:2919 Replies:12 FollowUps:15
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Reply By: MartyB - Saturday, Jan 04, 2014 at 21:45

Saturday, Jan 04, 2014 at 21:45
Ok, for some reason my link did not appear.
That will make it hard to identify.
I will have another go.Snake
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Reply By: The Explorer - Saturday, Jan 04, 2014 at 21:54

Saturday, Jan 04, 2014 at 21:54
Hi

Possibly a crowned snake of some type but a few options. Can you specify location? Australia is a big place and knowing where you spotted it reduces possibilities a lot.

Cheers
Greg
I sent one final shout after him to stick to the track, to which he replied “All right,” That was the last ever seen of Gibson - E Giles 23 April 1874

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Follow Up By: MartyB - Saturday, Jan 04, 2014 at 21:56

Saturday, Jan 04, 2014 at 21:56
Hi Greg,
South Eastern Queensland.

Marty.
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Follow Up By: The Explorer - Saturday, Jan 04, 2014 at 22:12

Saturday, Jan 04, 2014 at 22:12
Ok - bit hard (for a West Aussie) but beginning to think it is a juvenile Eastern Brown Snake (Pseudonaja textillis). They are highly variable in colour but some young individuals in the books I have look similar to your pic. Hopefully a "local" may pipe in and provide further feedback.

Cheers
Greg
I sent one final shout after him to stick to the track, to which he replied “All right,” That was the last ever seen of Gibson - E Giles 23 April 1874

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Follow Up By: Member - Peter&Lynore - Saturday, Jan 04, 2014 at 22:28

Saturday, Jan 04, 2014 at 22:28
Hi Marty send a picture to hodreptiles@australiazoo.com.au they will be able to tell you.
Peter
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Follow Up By: Wayne's 60 - Saturday, Jan 04, 2014 at 22:52

Saturday, Jan 04, 2014 at 22:52
To Peter & Lynore,

Many thanks for a very valuable link. Sometimes finding this type of information links are near impossible. A great resource. :-)

Safe travels.

Cheers,
Wayne & Sally.

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Reply By: The Bantam - Sunday, Jan 05, 2014 at 00:20

Sunday, Jan 05, 2014 at 00:20
realy the picture leaves a bit to be desired.
ya realy need to see the colour and a good look at the head..minimum.

cheers
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Follow Up By: AlbyNSW - Sunday, Jan 05, 2014 at 08:10

Sunday, Jan 05, 2014 at 08:10
Agree, from the photo you can determine it is a snake because it has no legs but little other distinguishable features
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Reply By: get outmore - Sunday, Jan 05, 2014 at 08:19

Sunday, Jan 05, 2014 at 08:19
Agree sorry the pic is ....... average to say the least
Juvinile brown was my first guess
AnswerID: 523906

Reply By: Member - P and JM - Sunday, Jan 05, 2014 at 09:49

Sunday, Jan 05, 2014 at 09:49
Link that may help you. if not just type snakes of southeast queensland in google

http://www.ehp.qld.gov.au/wildlife/livingwith/snakes/near-you/snakes_of_southeast_queensland.html

Cheers P&J
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Reply By: Motherhen - Sunday, Jan 05, 2014 at 09:58

Sunday, Jan 05, 2014 at 09:58
The best way of identifying a snake, as colour vary, is the scalation underneath - but best to treat him with caution and don't look :O

While I have collected a number of good links to help identify snakes and other creatures we may meet on our travels, I have found ExplorOz one of the best, with good knowledgeable members here. That photo does not enable me to identify your snake Marty.

Motherhen
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Reply By: MartyB - Sunday, Jan 05, 2014 at 09:59

Sunday, Jan 05, 2014 at 09:59
Thanks for your replies. So it is probably a juvenile eastern brown and next time I have to get it to pose better for the photo.

Marty.
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Reply By: allein m - Sunday, Jan 05, 2014 at 10:30

Sunday, Jan 05, 2014 at 10:30
You said Queensland but I was just wondering where it was found near a home or out in the bush

I find it amazing after almost ten years in Broken Hill and at least 2 or 3 times a week out of town walking out two dogs we saw just one baby snake

I did find a 1955 half penny on one walk god knows how long that was out there for

AnswerID: 523919

Follow Up By: MartyB - Sunday, Jan 05, 2014 at 11:13

Sunday, Jan 05, 2014 at 11:13
Hi Allein,
Near our home, but we live on a bushy block.

Marty.
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Follow Up By: allein m - Sunday, Jan 05, 2014 at 17:55

Sunday, Jan 05, 2014 at 17:55
Ok thank you looks like you will have to be carefull in the future especially if you have any kids or may even grand kids

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Follow Up By: MartyB - Sunday, Jan 05, 2014 at 18:18

Sunday, Jan 05, 2014 at 18:18
There are plenty of snakes about but they don't worry us. We keep out of their road and they keep out of our road. With the possible exception of the carpet snake who liked chicken. He got to go on a holiday to the nearby environmental park.

Marty.
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Follow Up By: allein m - Sunday, Jan 05, 2014 at 18:23

Sunday, Jan 05, 2014 at 18:23
yes they are amazing creatures really I would have nightmares know the number of snakes I have walk past not knowing there were there

here in Broken Hill they will only attack if they feel threatened in most cases
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Follow Up By: wozzie (WA) - Wednesday, Jan 08, 2014 at 16:57

Wednesday, Jan 08, 2014 at 16:57
The coin would positively not have been there before 1955......



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Follow Up By: allein m - Wednesday, Jan 08, 2014 at 18:28

Wednesday, Jan 08, 2014 at 18:28
true the are in question is part of the north regeneration area and I have since found out it was where the camel trains stopped and unloaded and was used as accommodation for the camel drivers

there is a small mosque still there you pass it on the way to the Tiboburra road i would say many form members have passed it on there travels and some may have seen it
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Reply By: Member -Pinko (NSW) - Sunday, Jan 05, 2014 at 19:58

Sunday, Jan 05, 2014 at 19:58
Son was visiting and after the big bash finished he went out to close his car windows after a hot day.
He didn't turn on the verandah lights on the way out but activated the sensor that turned on the lights on the way back.
Helloooo I'm a carpet snake and I am over two metres long and thicker than your arm, thanks for stepping over me on the way out.
Living is a journey,it depends on where you go !
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Reply By: Penchy - Monday, Jan 06, 2014 at 08:14

Monday, Jan 06, 2014 at 08:14
Why?

Did it sneak into the kids tent, or are you just trying to see how snake savvy the member on here are?
AnswerID: 523953

Follow Up By: MartyB - Monday, Jan 06, 2014 at 13:07

Monday, Jan 06, 2014 at 13:07
Hi Penchy,
My son caught it and I was wondering what it was.

Marty.
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Reply By: Member - Gary W (NSW) - Tuesday, Jan 07, 2014 at 19:29

Tuesday, Jan 07, 2014 at 19:29
Hi Marty,

It looks like a dull version of the Red-Naped Snake

Red-Naped Snake

Gary
AnswerID: 524062

Follow Up By: The Explorer - Wednesday, Jan 08, 2014 at 10:05

Wednesday, Jan 08, 2014 at 10:05
...looks way to small but OP hasn't revealed size of specimen in question....plus do you get "dull versions" of the red-naped snake?

Cheers
Greg
I sent one final shout after him to stick to the track, to which he replied “All right,” That was the last ever seen of Gibson - E Giles 23 April 1874

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Reply By: Kerry W (WA) - Wednesday, Jan 08, 2014 at 03:03

Wednesday, Jan 08, 2014 at 03:03
Looks like a dark Keelback - harmless. Can appear aggressive and dangerous but they have grinding teeth not fangs.

Have not got time to give you all the key identifying features but check the double scales from anus to tip of tail. (the main underbelly has single scales). Dorsal scales have little ridges on them.

Colours Vary. Can be grey yellowy brown to almost black.

Took me ages to identify the first one I found.
In fact they are important cause they EAT CANE TOADS without ill effect. (Thats why they are so common now - other snakes eat toads and die). Keelbacks are often mistaken for Browns.


Identification info is at the bottom of this informative article.

http://www.google.com.au/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=2&cad=rja&ved=0CDEQFjAB&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.qm.qld.gov.au%2FLearning%2BResources%2F~%2Fmedia%2FDocuments%2FLearning%2520resources%2FQM%2FResources%2FFact%2520Sheets%2Ffact-sheet-keelback-snake.pdf&ei=PiDMUuOXOYPukQXXk4CACw&usg=AFQjCNEZz3SHeQuL9tiLnUSIOIHA2o00Hw&bvm=bv.58187178,d.dGI

Please spread the word once you can identify them cause too many Keelbacks are being killed out of ignorance and fear that they are browns.

Hope this helps

Kerry W (Qld)
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Follow Up By: Kerry W (WA) - Wednesday, Jan 08, 2014 at 03:10

Follow Up By: The Explorer - Wednesday, Jan 08, 2014 at 09:58

Wednesday, Jan 08, 2014 at 09:58
Here is a another link....much the same info..

Freshwater Snake (Keelback Snake)

Seems to lack orange red coloration around neck evident in OP's picture....but who knows.

Cheers
Greg

I sent one final shout after him to stick to the track, to which he replied “All right,” That was the last ever seen of Gibson - E Giles 23 April 1874

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