Spare tyre as air tank

Submitted: Thursday, Jan 09, 2014 at 11:10
ThreadID: 105739 Views:5458 Replies:10 FollowUps:22
This Thread has been Archived
Has anyone tried to use their spare tyre as a tank for their air compressor? I have no idea what a safe pressure might be for an unloaded light truck 4WD tyre. Any advice would be appreciated.
Back Expand Un-Read 0 Moderator

Reply By: Road Warrior - Thursday, Jan 09, 2014 at 11:55

Thursday, Jan 09, 2014 at 11:55
Interesting concept. The max "safe" pressure is usually indicated on the small writing on the tyre (i.e. max pressure 60psi etc) so you'd have to check that out and go from there.
AnswerID: 524139

Reply By: Peter_n_Margaret - Thursday, Jan 09, 2014 at 12:12

Thursday, Jan 09, 2014 at 12:12
I sometimes over inflate the spares for this purpose.
I would guess that while static they could probably be over inflated by at least 50%, but don't really know.

I also carry a tyre to tyre fitting for my air hose, so I can blow up a flat from the spare.

Cheers,
Peter
OKA196 Motorhome
AnswerID: 524140

Follow Up By: Dr Hook - Thursday, Jan 09, 2014 at 13:52

Thursday, Jan 09, 2014 at 13:52
Yep, as for Peter:
for around 35 years I've been using my spare as a "quick-fill" reservoir after sand driving: I use a coiled airline I bought from K-mart (for around $7.99 in the 1970's).
Ignore the "max pressure rating" - that's for under load on the road,, hot from driving...., where compression from bumps and corrugations need to be allowed for.

I fill the spare to 120psi or so before each trip, and have had no problem except for one year I left the pressure in after a bush trip and when I next took the spare tyre cover off 12 months later, (ie after a long hot summer) found a small bulge in an otherwise unused tyre - from memory, Bridgestone gave me a free replacement......

I can air up 3 tyres to highway-adequate pressure whilst my compressor tops off the 4th tyre, then check and top them off at the next service station. That means I get there before all the other trip members arrive and want to hog the Servo's compressor for themselves! (nyuk, nyuk)
Hook
0
FollowupID: 805722

Reply By: The Explorer - Thursday, Jan 09, 2014 at 12:16

Thursday, Jan 09, 2014 at 12:16
Hi.

...if you do a forum search of "air tank" you will get a few threads discussing subject in varying degrees. 60 to 70 psi seems to be a figured used a lot but supposed it depends on tyre. The fact that the spare tyre is unloaded may also determine what is a safe inflation limit (?).

Cheers
Greg
I sent one final shout after him to stick to the track, to which he replied “All right,” That was the last ever seen of Gibson - E Giles 23 April 1874

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message
Moderator

AnswerID: 524141

Reply By: Ross M - Thursday, Jan 09, 2014 at 12:35

Thursday, Jan 09, 2014 at 12:35
KeithB
You can over inflate a tyre, but why would you want to have a tyre continually under more pressure than the manufacturer says is safe? If the continual long term pressure damages the tyre and it then fails it most likely will result in damage to you and your vehicle.

A silly thing to do.

A spare tyre used in such a fashion will mean the over inflated spare can only possibly deliver a half charge to a flat tyre and the spare is then only half too.

Why not buy a suitable good quality compressor and use it when required.
If a cheap skate, buy two cheapies and use one until it fails and then the other one. At least you can blow up more than one tyre in the life of the compressor.
The idea of a compressor is so you don't need a tank at all. If using the air pressure and flow volume for dust blowing or air tools then a tyre is pretty useless.

The flow rate with the valve IN is small and you aren't going to have a valveless spare for more flow.
AnswerID: 524142

Reply By: Member - Craig F (WA) - Thursday, Jan 09, 2014 at 13:38

Thursday, Jan 09, 2014 at 13:38
My MT ATZ are rated to 80psi by memory.
My tank on my compressor is set to 100psi max 80 min by recall. (8ltr Capacity)
Using a spare as a tank would need a manifold to house the relief valve and pressure switch. With a max safe pressure of 80psi it isnt realy a practical solution taking into account what is available today at a resonable price. You can get a tank with all the plumming and safety fittings for under 100$.

When considering why you would need a tank its pointless if you dont have a high capacity compressor to feed it or a very big tank. I utilize mine to re-set tyres and run air tools. Without the compressor to back it up you would need a big tank to keep the workable pressure.
AnswerID: 524145

Reply By: Michael ( Moss Vale NSW) - Thursday, Jan 09, 2014 at 13:41

Thursday, Jan 09, 2014 at 13:41
I do exactly that! I have my Big Red Compressor mounted inside the spare wheel holder on the back door of the Patrol and connects to the schrader air fitting on the tyre, air cuts out at 60PSI ( BFG A/Ts max pressure is 80PSI), works well! Michael
Patrol 4.2TDi 2003

Retired 2016 and now Out and About!

There's time to rest when you're dead,
Get out and do something instead!

Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

AnswerID: 524146

Follow Up By: Robin Miller - Thursday, Jan 09, 2014 at 14:18

Thursday, Jan 09, 2014 at 14:18
Just a note Michael - The BFG pressure is a minimum not a max.

It says maxium load single axle 1550kg at 80psi cold, any less than 80 psi and it can't carry that load.

P.S. 80 is for E load range and 65 is for D load range in standard 265/75/16 (I have a set of both and don't put more than around 100 psi in my spare tyre tank).

Robin Miller

Member
My Profile  Send Message

1
FollowupID: 805725

Follow Up By: Michael ( Moss Vale NSW) - Thursday, Jan 09, 2014 at 14:29

Thursday, Jan 09, 2014 at 14:29
Thanks Robin, Thats even better. I'll have a look, mine are D rated 265x75 as you mentioned. If I have 80PSI max, that means I can transfer quickly to a totally flat tyre, a road pressure of 40PSi + - a little!! Michael
Patrol 4.2TDi 2003

Retired 2016 and now Out and About!

There's time to rest when you're dead,
Get out and do something instead!

Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 805727

Follow Up By: Michael ( Moss Vale NSW) - Thursday, Jan 09, 2014 at 14:42

Thursday, Jan 09, 2014 at 14:42




Connection from Compressor to tyre and Ryco chuck in centre swings up to connect hose!
Patrol 4.2TDi 2003

Retired 2016 and now Out and About!

There's time to rest when you're dead,
Get out and do something instead!

Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 805728

Follow Up By: Robin Miller - Thursday, Jan 09, 2014 at 14:43

Thursday, Jan 09, 2014 at 14:43
Hi Michael

Ok , some years ago when this was a hot topic I tried to get a real max pressure and got interesting results as different manufacturers have different wording.

My commodore at the time was one of few which stated a clear maximum air pressure which was 144psi.

Most BFG's were load D requiring 65psi min then and I did get a statement saying that typical inflation pressure reccomended was 65 psi + 10% or 72 psi to guarrantee it could carry its advertised load.

I set out to find true max pressure in spare tank configuration which is no load but subject to very high temps in direct sunlight.

I came up with 250psi as rupture point but could get no one to put that in writing.

I attempted to test this but none of my equpiment would go above about 170 something psi so I didn't get a result.

Robin Miller

Member
My Profile  Send Message

1
FollowupID: 805729

Follow Up By: Robin Miller - Thursday, Jan 09, 2014 at 14:48

Thursday, Jan 09, 2014 at 14:48
Nice pic Michael.

While we are on the subject should mention to Keith that a screw on fitting is best not clip on.

Also one should be aware that the tubeless valve fitting comes in different ratings and some cheapies won't hold 100 psi - but I don't know current rating of those used by tyre fitters.
Robin Miller

Member
My Profile  Send Message

1
FollowupID: 805731

Reply By: Robin Miller - Thursday, Jan 09, 2014 at 14:33

Thursday, Jan 09, 2014 at 14:33
Many of us have been doing that forever Keith.

Its very useful and provides a backup to the normal compressor.

For any particular tyre you should read what it says on it of course but for common 4wd tyres I usually limit pressure to around 100 psi (see note I put in Michaels reply).

When on a trip and tyre needs a refill then I put in 85 psi because thats the cut-out pressure in my ARB locker compressor.

85 PSI though is a handy figure as it can top up 4 tyres.

I.E. If tyres were dropped to 18 psi then putting them up to 30 psi takes
4 X 12psi or 48psi leaving the spare with approx 37 PSI. (implies spare is same size as other tyres)


Other useful Features
------------------------------
Provides omph to re-seat a bead.

Provides air power to de-dust the car, or clean a filter.

Great way to balance tyre pressures.

In practise I usually pump up a tyre or two from compressor while also using spare tyre tank

Its espically fun to rob air out of someone parked nearbys tyres.
Robin Miller

Member
My Profile  Send Message

AnswerID: 524153

Follow Up By: Michael ( Moss Vale NSW) - Thursday, Jan 09, 2014 at 14:53

Thursday, Jan 09, 2014 at 14:53
Robin! True, I got the idea from old Jack Absalom when he had his Safe outback travel show on TV in the 70s! I have been using it since my HK Monaro in 1973. Michael
Patrol 4.2TDi 2003

Retired 2016 and now Out and About!

There's time to rest when you're dead,
Get out and do something instead!

Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 805732

Follow Up By: Member - Andrew L (QLD) - Thursday, Jan 09, 2014 at 17:49

Thursday, Jan 09, 2014 at 17:49
I'm another user of the spare tyre for uses similar to Robin. Been doing it for decades.
1
FollowupID: 805749

Reply By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Thursday, Jan 09, 2014 at 14:40

Thursday, Jan 09, 2014 at 14:40
Its what I've also done for years, but I only use to for reseating tubeless beads that are stubborn. So I just hook it in when necessary. Need to have the valve cores removed on both tyres to be effective.
Not convinced it adds much for routine reinflation if you have one of those big compressors - I've had a TT3 (150L/min) compressor for about 4 years now and its really quick on a 285 tyre.
AnswerID: 524154

Follow Up By: Michael ( Moss Vale NSW) - Thursday, Jan 09, 2014 at 17:02

Thursday, Jan 09, 2014 at 17:02
Phil! What's a TT3 look like and who sells them? Michael
Patrol 4.2TDi 2003

Retired 2016 and now Out and About!

There's time to rest when you're dead,
Get out and do something instead!

Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 805744

Follow Up By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Thursday, Jan 09, 2014 at 21:22

Thursday, Jan 09, 2014 at 21:22
Gday Michael,
LINK
Its a Terrain Tamer series 3 which is their biggest compressor. They released it in 2009, but its becoming quite common under a number of different names. They are big, reasonably heavy, pull 45 amps, and sound very lazy as they pump 150 L/min. Mine's done a lot of work and it's been 100% reliable. There are a lot of very similar looking compressors on the market now. I don't know whether they are all the same quality.

I agree that you usually get what you pay for but I think these are a bargain. My Blue Tongue 3 compressor (made in USA by Thomas) is now 13 years old, and I still carry it as a backup, but its too slow on the big tyres.
0
FollowupID: 805766

Follow Up By: Michael ( Moss Vale NSW) - Thursday, Jan 09, 2014 at 21:38

Thursday, Jan 09, 2014 at 21:38
Hi Phil, Thats the only downfall to myBig Red, Speed, also a Thomas product. I went for reliability but now its a different ball game. I also made the comment to Craig lower in the post that their are so many copies its hard to know what is good and what is not. I appreciate the information. Ill check it out. Michael
Patrol 4.2TDi 2003

Retired 2016 and now Out and About!

There's time to rest when you're dead,
Get out and do something instead!

Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 805768

Follow Up By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Thursday, Jan 09, 2014 at 21:57

Thursday, Jan 09, 2014 at 21:57
This one on EBay looks identical to what I have; can't vouch for it in any other way.
0
FollowupID: 805774

Reply By: Member - Craig F (WA) - Thursday, Jan 09, 2014 at 15:02

Thursday, Jan 09, 2014 at 15:02
Personally I can’t see the point in all this fluffing around with utilizing the spare tyre. It all kind of goes south if the tyre needs to be used so carrying a compressor is still a necessity if required to re-seat, with no spare now is the time that you need this capability. Many modern compressors are capable of running air-tools re-seating tyre etc without a tank. A purpose built tank with all the safety features is well within the price range of most users these days. As for one comment of getting enough air into the tyres quick enough to get to the servo to finish the job, I think I would rather do it once on the track.
AnswerID: 524156

Follow Up By: Michael ( Moss Vale NSW) - Thursday, Jan 09, 2014 at 15:13

Thursday, Jan 09, 2014 at 15:13
Craig! My compressor is mounted inside the spare wheel holder as mentioned mainly because I had no where else to mount it. Some mount it under their driver seat but i didn't want the heat or the noise inside the vehicle. So being so close to the spare, its a natural progression to utilise that spare as a tank, saves buying a tank, finding a place to mount it and more weight. If I need to use the spare, I simply have a valve ready, unscrew the fitting off the valve stem and insert the valve. Add or subtract air to what I need. I also have a small ball valve to turn off when I need the spare and the compressor operates normally without a tank. I always put a fair amount of thought into things I make to ensure it covers all angles! It definately works well for me! regards Michael
Patrol 4.2TDi 2003

Retired 2016 and now Out and About!

There's time to rest when you're dead,
Get out and do something instead!

Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 805733

Follow Up By: Member - Craig F (WA) - Thursday, Jan 09, 2014 at 16:29

Thursday, Jan 09, 2014 at 16:29
Hi Michael,
I appreciate what you are doing and we all have our own way.
What I am saying is that with modern compressors you need to question the need for all this. To my understanding the Big Red puts out around 29 ltr/min @ 30 PSI its efficiency above 40PSI is very low.
The new CKMP12 from ARB will do over 60ltr/min @ 30PSI and the CKMTP 112 will do 132 ltr/min @ 30 PSI.
To answer the original OP. If I was setting up a 4wd I would recommend a descent brand name compressor. You could then go to the trouble of getting a manifold made up complete with one way valves from a hydraulic shop that can be used on that rare occassion to plug in multiple compressors or a line to your spare or even better somebody else’s if you need a burst for re-seating a tyre.
I had one made up several years ago. I can plumb it into multiple (4)compressors if need be the one way valves stop back feeding to a lesser supply.
Regards Craig
0
FollowupID: 805736

Follow Up By: Michael ( Moss Vale NSW) - Thursday, Jan 09, 2014 at 16:45

Thursday, Jan 09, 2014 at 16:45
Craig, I get your point and the Big Red isn't so big! I have had it for many years, i bought it because I knew they were reliable, made in the USA. It was a compromise between a more powerful unknown and a lesses known. There are so many copies of compressors now, its a bit of a jungle out there! But yes, things have moved on and the outputs are huge compared to only a few years ago. Its just a matter of working out whats good and whats not!! regards Michael
Patrol 4.2TDi 2003

Retired 2016 and now Out and About!

There's time to rest when you're dead,
Get out and do something instead!

Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 805739

Follow Up By: Member - Craig F (WA) - Thursday, Jan 09, 2014 at 17:09

Thursday, Jan 09, 2014 at 17:09
I agree Michael.
Was out on the weekend with a mate that has had his from when they first came out they are a good reliable bit of kit.
My comments are aimed at the original OP as he is questioning the merit of setting up to use his. 20 years ago I to used my spare as my tyre compressor needed a lie down and a bex after two tyres even to the point where I carried an extra spare.
If you were to set up a car now would you opt for the same again or a more efficient (and reliable) compressor?

cheers
0
FollowupID: 805745

Follow Up By: Michael ( Moss Vale NSW) - Thursday, Jan 09, 2014 at 18:23

Thursday, Jan 09, 2014 at 18:23
Craig, When i bought the Big Red, many compressors were fairly ordinary. Today many more people are setting up vehicles and using them regularly to get a handle on what's good. Phil G just mentioned one he has had for 4 years without problem! Michael
Patrol 4.2TDi 2003

Retired 2016 and now Out and About!

There's time to rest when you're dead,
Get out and do something instead!

Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 805753

Follow Up By: Member - Craig F (WA) - Thursday, Jan 09, 2014 at 19:24

Thursday, Jan 09, 2014 at 19:24
Agree,
Just swapped out an ARB compressor that has been under bonnet next to my turbo for ten yrs.
Poor man buys twice. There is a lot to be said about quality products.
1
FollowupID: 805759

Follow Up By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Thursday, Jan 09, 2014 at 21:41

Thursday, Jan 09, 2014 at 21:41
I agree that you need to buy quality - a compressor can move from one car to the next so its usually money well spent.

BUT....Compressors have got a lot quicker/stronger/ and consumes more amps over the years. I find I have replaced mine when something a lot quicker comes onto the market (not from a compressor wearing out). I'm guessing Craig replaced his ARB for the same reason - those old ARB compressors are reliable but pretty slow compared to what's around today.
Out of interest,
My 1989 "KMart" compressor used 5.75 amps
My 2000 Blue Tongue (Thomas compressor used 16.5 amps
My 2009 Terrain Tamer (Chinese) compressor uses 45 amps.
And the flow is pretty much proportional to the amps. And none of these compressors died despite a lot of use (4wd club stuff etc)

I'll be interested to see whether this Chinese one lasts as long as the others, but after 4 1/2 years it hasn't missed a beat.

But I can't see any real need for a tank when a compressor can now push 150 l/min.
0
FollowupID: 805770

Follow Up By: Michael ( Moss Vale NSW) - Thursday, Jan 09, 2014 at 21:56

Thursday, Jan 09, 2014 at 21:56
Yes! 150 litres compared to my 30 LPM, big difference! Michael
Patrol 4.2TDi 2003

Retired 2016 and now Out and About!

There's time to rest when you're dead,
Get out and do something instead!

Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 805773

Follow Up By: Member - Craig F (WA) - Thursday, Jan 09, 2014 at 21:59

Thursday, Jan 09, 2014 at 21:59
Hi Phil,
My ARB twin is also pushing 40amps.
I replaced the one under the bonnet as it was slow and due for a re-build. As 10 yrs was a good life I decided to replaced it. Mind you I did sell it for a bit of beer money.
What I looked for in a compressor is how it performed under load. A lot state high Lpm but under load their performance soon diminishes. The twin has both good performance 60+ Lpm @30 Psi and a 100% duty cycle.

My pet hate is getting asked on the beach to inflate other peoples tyres due to their cheep Chinese compressor failing. Its up to the individual what they purchase but not my obligation to constantly help out. Before Christmas I was approached by a person in a shinny new 200 who asked me to inflate his tyres as he only had a small cheapy that he uses in an emergency. He then stated that he always gets somebody who will pump up his tyres!
0
FollowupID: 805777

Follow Up By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Thursday, Jan 09, 2014 at 22:33

Thursday, Jan 09, 2014 at 22:33
Yeah, ARB twin wasn't around in 2009. It would be high on my list for a compressor now, but I've been pretty impressed by the TTAC3, which was the fastest one around at the time. Pumps my 285's up to 50psi in quick time.
0
FollowupID: 805780

Reply By: Member - KeithB - Saturday, Jan 11, 2014 at 20:51

Saturday, Jan 11, 2014 at 20:51
Thanks everyone.
This thread has been most educational for me.
Keith
AnswerID: 524306

Sponsored Links

Popular Products (13)