The old Paypal scam

Submitted: Thursday, Jan 16, 2014 at 10:26
ThreadID: 105834 Views:4614 Replies:13 FollowUps:50
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Regarding our Conqueror listed for sale in the classified section and on Gumtree.

I receive text message making initial enquiry and this is how it then unfolds........

Subject: Van
Date: Thu, 16 Jan 2014 09:08:48 +1000
G’day Mark

Still available.

Regards
Ross

Subject: RE: Van

Thanks for the swift response...I am OK with the asking price.due to the nature of my job and location...i will not be able to come for inspection,am a very busy type as i work long hours everyday,i have gone through your advertisement and i am satisfied with it.As for the payment..i will be paying you via the fastest and secure way to pay online(PayPal).I have a private courier agent that will come for the pick up after the payment have been made ...so no shipping included.You can now send me your PayPal email so i can pay in right away and also include your address in your reply.If you don't have a paypal account, you can easily set up one...log on to www.paypal.com.au and sign up.all i really need from you is the exact details.Kindly delete the posting as am definitely buying it from you and it would be sad for me to make the payment only to be informed of the its sale.
Thanks.

Date: Thu, 16 Jan 2014 09:14:08 +1000
I think not.

Regards
Ross

Due to my present location, my choices are limited and not often available by the phone. I am an honorable man and you will receive your money cash in hand before this is picked up. However, it's easy and free to open a paypal account. Just go to there website www.paypal.com and sign up a personal account there. Paypal is the world leading payment master that protects both buyer/seller interest. You are on a secured transaction with paypal. Above all, it's like instant cash. As soon as you open an account, get back to me with the name and email that you linked with your paypal account and I will have your money sent asap. And due to the nature of my job and having being a paypal customer for the past 6 year with no charge back,I feel more comfortable sending my funds via paypal due to there various security measures at ensuring safe and secured transaction between both buyer/seller. But, if you feel otherwise, I totally understand

Regards

Am I suspicious .............. you betcha.
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Reply By: landseka - Thursday, Jan 16, 2014 at 10:41

Thursday, Jan 16, 2014 at 10:41
Nothing new there, 90% of Gumtree ads get this response. Ignore it.
AnswerID: 524598

Reply By: Member - LeighW - Thursday, Jan 16, 2014 at 10:43

Thursday, Jan 16, 2014 at 10:43
The incredibly sad part is they keep sending these scams so people must be still falling for them :(

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Reply By: Member - LeighW - Thursday, Jan 16, 2014 at 10:48

Thursday, Jan 16, 2014 at 10:48
Forgot to add, I advertised my camper just before Christmas on Ebay, Gumtree and the trading post. Supposedly not a good time to sell, sold within two days, first looker wanted to ponder and get back to me second brought unit then first wanted to too but already gone :)

So keep your fingers crossed and hopefully should sell soon.

PS All my fraudulent approaches were through the Trading Post add.

Cheers
Leigh

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Reply By: Gordonk - Thursday, Jan 16, 2014 at 12:11

Thursday, Jan 16, 2014 at 12:11
Hi Ross,
I've just read your story and sorry to sound like a numpty - but I'm unsure of what the scam actually is?? I can see this guy go on and on and on about PayPal (unusually fantastic amount) but other than that I don't know what is wrong - if you don't hand over the van until the money is cleared anyway?? Is it the idea of them knowing straight away where you are and just helping themselves to the van without payment?? I do have a PayPal account but haven't ever used it to make a purchase online, I usually just do a bank deposit. I must say he sounds extremely hard to get a hold of and I understand that does pose a suspicious style in my books too, but again unsure of what the actual scam is. If you could let me know that would be great as I wouldn't want to fall into the same scheme either.
Good luck with the sale of the van mate; hope it all goes well for you.
Cheers
Tracey & Gordon
AnswerID: 524603

Follow Up By: Member - Rosco from way back - Thursday, Jan 16, 2014 at 12:28

Thursday, Jan 16, 2014 at 12:28
G'day Gordon

It's fairly typical of this type of scam (Google it for enlightenment). It's been fairly well reported. The other giveaway is the poor grammar and sentence construction ... and no I'm not a pedant. It's highly likely he's some scurrilous scoundrel from Nigeria or dropping of sturgeon excrement from Russia.

However let's hear from other forumites if they agree or disagree. From my perspective it's firmly in the scam bucket.
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Follow Up By: Member Andys Adventures - Thursday, Jan 16, 2014 at 12:34

Thursday, Jan 16, 2014 at 12:34
Hi Gordon,
The scam works this way, He puts the funds into paypal and sends a truck around to pick it up. When the truck arrives you look up your paypal account and see the funds in their so you give the van to the truck driver and he leaves. As soon as he has left he rings the scammer and then he notifies paypal that the van was no good and dose a reversal. By the time you try to get the funds out of paypal and into your bank account it is gone and so is your van which you have provided a receipt for.
Read how to scam the scammer in my post below
Cheers Andy
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Follow Up By: Shaker - Thursday, Jan 16, 2014 at 13:35

Thursday, Jan 16, 2014 at 13:35
This post has been read by the moderation team and has been moderated due to a breach of The Post Removed by Request Rule .

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Follow Up By: Shaker - Thursday, Jan 16, 2014 at 13:38

Thursday, Jan 16, 2014 at 13:38
This post has been read by the moderation team and has been moderated due to a breach of The Post Removed by Request Rule .

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Follow Up By: Member - Rosco from way back - Thursday, Jan 16, 2014 at 13:56

Thursday, Jan 16, 2014 at 13:56
I apologise to your obviously delicate and precious sensibilities.

How would you describe the low life scum from that neck of the woods renowned for preying on the poor unsuspecting and gullible souls who fall prey to their nefarious schemes and scams?

I, however, make no apologies for not being an avid follower of the bs political correctness foisted upon us by the do gooders of the world who basically wouldn't have a bloody clue.
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Follow Up By: Aussi Traveller - Thursday, Jan 16, 2014 at 14:09

Thursday, Jan 16, 2014 at 14:09
And that your honour is how the fight started.
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Follow Up By: Member - Rosco from way back - Thursday, Jan 16, 2014 at 14:24

Thursday, Jan 16, 2014 at 14:24
Good one old son ... ;o)
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Follow Up By: Shaker - Thursday, Jan 16, 2014 at 14:25

Thursday, Jan 16, 2014 at 14:25
I would describe them as low life scum without the need to refer to skin colour & make myself appear to be a racist bogan!
There are plenty of white people in Nigeria.

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Follow Up By: Member - Rosco from way back - Thursday, Jan 16, 2014 at 14:41

Thursday, Jan 16, 2014 at 14:41
And this "plenty" have been involved in the well reported scams?

Let's agree to disagree shall we, as I do not resile from my previous comment.
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Follow Up By: Member - Rosco from way back - Thursday, Jan 16, 2014 at 16:56

Thursday, Jan 16, 2014 at 16:56
Edited under protest; however I do acknowledge and defer to the Mod Squad for their sometimes unpleasant, albeit necessary role.

Life's far too short to loose your sense of humour.
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Follow Up By: Member - Terry W4 - Friday, Jan 17, 2014 at 10:33

Friday, Jan 17, 2014 at 10:33
I recall that 1/3 of the so called Phising scams we're run by a chap later extradited to the US living in Bathurst NSW.
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Follow Up By: Nomadic Navara - Friday, Jan 17, 2014 at 10:42

Friday, Jan 17, 2014 at 10:42
Political Correctness

A doctrine, fostered by a delusional, illogical minority, and rabidly promoted by an unscrupulous mainstream media, which holds forth the proposition that it is entirely possible to pick up a turd by the clean end.


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Follow Up By: Member - Rosco from way back - Friday, Jan 17, 2014 at 10:49

Friday, Jan 17, 2014 at 10:49
Bravo Peter

Well said and succinctly explained.
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Follow Up By: get outmore - Monday, Jan 27, 2014 at 12:53

Monday, Jan 27, 2014 at 12:53
I thought the scam was to do with overpaying which is for transport and you send him his change and then he withdraws his money?

I would have thought a scam which involves stolen goods is far too much trouble for a scammer overseas

Regardless I was listening to a program on scams which sort of made it all make sense to me

99% of us wonder who falls for such obvious scams
well thats the whole point - to properly scam someone involves alot of work and has to be very intracate and even then doesnt have the highest rate of success.

hence the scam letter/email. very poorly written often rediculous
people laugh at it and throw it away(delete) this is EXACTLY what you were meant to do

the scammer doesnt want to waste his time with you
theres a small % who cant help themselves - youve read about them. Even after being scammed for more and more money they keep on sending.
thats whose being targeted and the junky emails is to filter out people who may realise its a scam later and the scammer wastes his time

Now on that note some of you may get emails warning of these scams from well intentioned people
SET THEM STRAIGHT
they are doing the scammers work for them. If the wrong person gets the warning email therywill reply to it and get scammed

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Reply By: Member Andys Adventures - Thursday, Jan 16, 2014 at 12:24

Thursday, Jan 16, 2014 at 12:24
Hi Rosco,
Why don't you scam the scammer, Set up a bank account and then a paypal account using that new bank account. Tell them to send money and when it shows up in paypal withdraw it. Paypal will pay it into that new account and them transfer that into another account then close the new account. Ounce you have his money and close the account paypal can not recover the money for him as he planed. Then watch as he will now have a van he dose not want and has no way to pick it up.
Have done this before selling a van, which I still have because he cant pick it up.
Cheers Andy
PS gumtree is full of scammers and should be avoided.
AnswerID: 524604

Follow Up By: Member - Rosco from way back - Thursday, Jan 16, 2014 at 12:34

Thursday, Jan 16, 2014 at 12:34
G'day Andy

I like the way you're thinking. Are you saying you actually have funds from someone who has as yet to collect the goods?

I was always under the impression the funds never actually arrived permanently.
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Follow Up By: Member - Rosco from way back - Thursday, Jan 16, 2014 at 13:00

Thursday, Jan 16, 2014 at 13:00
Plus Paypal take 3 days to release the funds.
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Follow Up By: Member - Mfewster(SA) - Thursday, Jan 16, 2014 at 13:48

Thursday, Jan 16, 2014 at 13:48
I don't follow this Andy. Your scam could be run on any buyer. How is what you have done different to the original scam (you have assumed it is a scan before taking your action). I can't see this being perpetrated from some unknown person overseas, who happens to have access to a pick up vehicle here in Australia. If you have the funds in your account, what is wrong with releasing the vehicle? All that needs to be done is for the seller to tell the buyer that they will hold the vehicle until funds are cleared into their account?
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Follow Up By: Member - Alan K (QLD) - Thursday, Jan 16, 2014 at 13:48

Thursday, Jan 16, 2014 at 13:48
The other way these people scam you is that they say they are a seaman at sea and will purchase it sight unseen. They work their timing so the payment transfer appears to be made. They say there is an issue with the shipping and could you pay the shipping $1500 or so, they are good for it, see I have paid for the car.

http://www.autoshippers.co.uk/car_shipping_scam.htm

You may get your money back for the car but the real target is the $1500 shipping fee yoiu get scammed out of.
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FollowupID: 806320

Follow Up By: Member Andys Adventures - Thursday, Jan 16, 2014 at 16:12

Thursday, Jan 16, 2014 at 16:12
Hi Mfewster,
He can pick up the van when ever he likes as he has paid for it but given he had no intention of ever buying the van it is still sitting here. The buyer can ask pay pal to refund the money as the sale did not go through. That is why I said close the bank account so it stops pay pal giving back the money. He now owns the van and I have his money.
Lesson never give anything away till the money is in your bank. If they don't like that then it's a scam.
And to answer Rosco question That is a yes. The funds are their but they take them back as soon as they have your van,car whatever. And you given them a receipt saying paid in full. But by closing the bank account Paypal have no account to draw the funds from and they lose.
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FollowupID: 806327

Follow Up By: Member - Mfewster(SA) - Thursday, Jan 16, 2014 at 16:29

Thursday, Jan 16, 2014 at 16:29
And Paypal accepted that? I wouldhave thought that they would take the view that you also have perpetrated a scam on them (perhaps in collaboration with the original supposed buyer) and that (if a claim for the return of the money was lodged with them, and if it wasn't, the story doesn't make sense) then Paypal would be taking the view that the sale didn't proceed and that therefore they would require you to return the $.

If you didn't return the $, I would think at the very least Paypal would have cancelled all dealings with you. Personally, I find Paypal to to useful to want to do that.
I still don't understand why the money was released to you so fast that you were able to close the account before the person came to pick up the vehicle?
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Follow Up By: Member - PJR (NSW) - Friday, Jan 17, 2014 at 18:42

Friday, Jan 17, 2014 at 18:42
Just ignore this advice given above and do nothing.

You don't know who these people are and may end up with an aerated front door and window .

Phil
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Follow Up By: brad1972 - Sunday, Jan 26, 2014 at 14:10

Sunday, Jan 26, 2014 at 14:10
The paypal scam on gumtree works a little differently to what most people are thinking. Paypal will ONLY accept a signed con note from a reputable courier/postal company as proof of delivery. The buyer pays you via paypal, picks up the van. Then lodges a claim saying you never gave him the van/ the van never arrived. Paypal askes for the signed con note from you- (which you don't have) as proof of delivery. Scammer gets his money back and gets to keep the van.

Now here's the kicker, you have moved the money as described above.

Paypal and the banks have a deal were the reversal IS taken from your credit card/ bank account even if its not there. You remain liable for the money you now owe paypal/ issuing bank.
My advice don't use paypal to sell anything valuable.
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FollowupID: 807027

Follow Up By: fisho64 - Sunday, Jan 26, 2014 at 19:11

Sunday, Jan 26, 2014 at 19:11
Andy you cannot open a Paypal account without a credit card.
You can maybe remove the funds but they can just charge it to your card.

But thats not how it works anyhow.
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Follow Up By: get outmore - Monday, Jan 27, 2014 at 13:01

Monday, Jan 27, 2014 at 13:01
Fish 064 - thats easy fixed with a debit card

regardless The ignore it sounds best I dont really know the angle of the scam but I do know it is one
you would very much struggle to get money from them (although it can happen apparantly if you have enough time )

worst case scenario is you could end up with some kind of bad credit black mark on your history which is more of a hassel than it sounds
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Reply By: Gordonk - Thursday, Jan 16, 2014 at 12:46

Thursday, Jan 16, 2014 at 12:46
Thanks very much Ross and Andy, that is what I was expecting it would be; but my impression was that you could wait until the funds cleared before handing over the van - that was why I was unsure why there was a problem. Cheers Tracey & Gordon
AnswerID: 524606

Reply By: TerraFirma - Thursday, Jan 16, 2014 at 15:15

Thursday, Jan 16, 2014 at 15:15
On the subject of Gumtree or the trading post for that matter it is very hard to buy something interstate or outside of your area because you are usually dealing with private sellers etc and they want you to send the money and then they send the goods. Off course you have no guarantee they'll send the goods and what rec-course do you have if they don't.? I find Ebay and Paypal so much easier.
AnswerID: 524612

Follow Up By: Member - Michael P (QLD) - Thursday, Jan 16, 2014 at 16:20

Thursday, Jan 16, 2014 at 16:20
Terra Firma,
E-Bay, Gumtree,The Trading Post and PayPal all the same company.
Mike.
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Follow Up By: TerraFirma - Thursday, Jan 16, 2014 at 16:55

Thursday, Jan 16, 2014 at 16:55
Michael, You are off track mate. When you buy via Ebay and PayPal you are protected. Buying via Gumtree from a private person interstate is not easy as they don't use Paypal. I couldn't give two hoots who owns what company it's the Paypal protection I'm after
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FollowupID: 806334

Follow Up By: TerraFirma - Thursday, Jan 16, 2014 at 16:55

Thursday, Jan 16, 2014 at 16:55
Michael, You are off track mate. When you buy via Ebay and PayPal you are protected. Buying via Gumtree from a private person interstate is not easy as they don't use Paypal. I couldn't give two hoots who owns what company it's the Paypal protection I'm after
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Follow Up By: Razerback - Thursday, Jan 16, 2014 at 17:05

Thursday, Jan 16, 2014 at 17:05
Agree there Terra Paypal has been fantastic for me. Bought a phone via Ebay and used Paypal. The seller wouldn't ship as they had re-listed the item at a higher price and didn't want to sell it to me at the agreed price. The seller was not responding to my emails so I lodged a Paypal dispute and case. I received a phone call from the seller within the hour who refunded my money and gave me a $40 Paypal donation for my trouble, if I promised not to negative feedback him. Without Paypal in this instance I would have struggled.
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Reply By: Michael ( Moss Vale NSW) - Thursday, Jan 16, 2014 at 16:35

Thursday, Jan 16, 2014 at 16:35
Rosco! you could add to your advertisment that it will be strictly cash on pickup or Bank deposit with 3 days to to appear in your account. Normal buyers would would think that is reasonable ! Michael
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Follow Up By: Razerback - Thursday, Jan 16, 2014 at 17:07

Thursday, Jan 16, 2014 at 17:07
Agree pretty simple really.
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Reply By: Member - LeighW - Thursday, Jan 16, 2014 at 17:04

Thursday, Jan 16, 2014 at 17:04
Another point to be wary of is they can use a hijacked Paypal account:

They hijack someones paypal account, buy the item and pay for it via the hijacked account. They then indicate that for some reason they can no longer pick up the item and could you please refund the money, but ask that the money be refunded to another account for some reason.

You refund the money etc, days or weeks later the owner of the hijacked account finds out about the unauthorised transaction and alerts Paypal who then either take the money back out of your account or freeze your account till they can do so.

You loose both ways, via the refund and then via the take back!

Probably many more ways these scam can work too.

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AnswerID: 524616

Follow Up By: fisho64 - Sunday, Jan 26, 2014 at 19:14

Sunday, Jan 26, 2014 at 19:14
why would they do that? If they can hack someones like that why not just put into a Russian account anyhow?
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Reply By: Member - Rosco from way back - Thursday, Jan 16, 2014 at 17:16

Thursday, Jan 16, 2014 at 17:16
Given the plethora of suggestions forthcoming I have contacted our illustrious prospective purchaser with the following: ........


I would be happy to proceed on that basis, however the van will not be available for collection until the funds have been cleared from Paypal and transferred to my bank account.

Regards
Ross


Will be interesting if I get a response. I shall keep you posted.
AnswerID: 524617

Follow Up By: Member - Rosco from way back - Thursday, Jan 16, 2014 at 17:19

Thursday, Jan 16, 2014 at 17:19
PS

It also begs the obvious question ...... What about the purchaser actually signing the transfer papers and so on???????????
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Follow Up By: Member - Mfewster(SA) - Thursday, Jan 16, 2014 at 18:40

Thursday, Jan 16, 2014 at 18:40
Yes, I think that is the appropriate way to deal with it.
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Follow Up By: Member - Rosco from way back - Thursday, Jan 16, 2014 at 18:45

Thursday, Jan 16, 2014 at 18:45
Response to my email .............

Subject: RE: Van

OK,i will like to have your PayPal email for payment and the price am going to pay in for you...


My followup email ..............

Sounds good. How do you propose to sign the necessary transfer forms?

Regards
Ross
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Follow Up By: Member - Rosco from way back - Thursday, Jan 16, 2014 at 18:52

Thursday, Jan 16, 2014 at 18:52
Next email rec'd ...............

With the issue of my details,transferring the name of ownership and signing of all paperwork will be done by the pick up agent so you don't have to worry about that all you need to do is to mail me your PayPal email and the price am going to pay in for you

My response .............

Sounds good, but I don’t have a Paypal account and I’m not really interested in setting one up.
What say we go with your offer of cash on collection? Will be much simpler all round.

Regards
Ross

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Follow Up By: Member - Rosco from way back - Thursday, Jan 16, 2014 at 19:16

Thursday, Jan 16, 2014 at 19:16
Oops

Did I say something wrong? The emails were flying thick and fast until I suggested we go with his offer of cash.

All quiet now .............. or am I merely a cynical old coot?

Log in for the next exciting episode .............
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Follow Up By: Member - Mfewster(SA) - Thursday, Jan 16, 2014 at 19:16

Thursday, Jan 16, 2014 at 19:16
I'd have been inclined to have accepted his offer. I can see all sorts of possibilities why he wouldn't want the $ to go with an agent, or the pick up person. As long as you have both agreed that the vehicle wont be available until after the funds are cleared and both understand that this takes about three days after the transfer to your Paypal account....,
I can't see that you have anything to lose. Setting up a Paypal account costs you nothing and is fast and convenient for many things.

If I went ahead I'd probably state that I would continue to run the ad but that he had preference for one week which should be sufficient time to conclude the deal.

He still may be genuine. It's a bit tricky for everyone buying/selling vehicles on line, especially if the buyer cannot inspect the vehicle. I have only done it once and got my 60 series at a bargain price. I was living in Alice Springs and the vehicle was in Victoria. The transaction required a bit of trust from both parties.
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Follow Up By: Member - Rosco from way back - Thursday, Jan 16, 2014 at 21:09

Thursday, Jan 16, 2014 at 21:09
True old mate, but there're a couple of salient points I think you may have overlooked.

The agent will have to be the person who signs the transfer papers.
This in essence means the van is transferred into his name, which he then has to transfer to the new owner.
In that event I can't see why the purchaser wouldn't also trust the agent with his hard earned. See where I'm coming from?

In the meantime the silence is deafening from our prospective purchaser, ever since I took him up on his offer of paying cash.

But let's give him the benefit of the doubt. Of course he's off somewhere working his butt off and not remotely near his email facility.

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Follow Up By: Member - Mfewster(SA) - Thursday, Jan 16, 2014 at 21:28

Thursday, Jan 16, 2014 at 21:28
Yep, I'm not saying your potential buyer is fair dinkum, he may not be and you have to protect yourself. I'd forgotten a camper trailer I sold to a bloke in WA about 8 years ago. I liked it and bought it on a snap decision but the wife hated it and we sold it almost immediately. the guy I sold it to bought it sight unseen following an ad on these pages and I had to deliver it to a transport company who put it on a huge rig from Adelaide to Perth. He sent me the $ in advance and I guess he had to trust me totally. The paperwork was completed after the trailer got to him but the transport company obviously weren't going to give me the $ on his behalf.
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Follow Up By: The Bantam - Thursday, Jan 16, 2014 at 23:27

Thursday, Jan 16, 2014 at 23:27
Fewster mate wake up and smell the sewage.....its a well known scam and there are a number of variations.

There is no way these parasites are genuine.

the big give away is when you get the very same message a week or two appart from the same email address but with different names in the text.

NObody in their right mind is going to buy a car, camper or whatever worth tens of thousands of dollars sight unseen.

Some of you are focusing on the payment of funds from the scammer.......he's not going to try that line if he cant get some funds out of you by cruder means.

These people must think that people are stupid......they only have ti find the small persentage who are, to make a very good living by third world standards.

cheers
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Follow Up By: Shaker - Friday, Jan 17, 2014 at 08:22

Friday, Jan 17, 2014 at 08:22
Plenty of people buy things worth tens of thousands if dollars sight unseen!
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Follow Up By: jacent - Friday, Jan 17, 2014 at 09:12

Friday, Jan 17, 2014 at 09:12
I recently brought a ve calais for $40,000 sight unseen over the phone, however it was from a dealer in Perth and had to trust the car was as he said, turned out to be perfect. The reason I couldn't see it in person is cos I live in the outback and couldn't get flights and this car was exactly what we had been looking for
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Follow Up By: Member - Rosco from way back - Friday, Jan 17, 2014 at 10:26

Friday, Jan 17, 2014 at 10:26
Fair enough jacent, however in that instance you were dealing with an identifiable individual at a known address. Not some anonymous, devoid of colour rag doll from a central African republic.

Back to our case in point. Our prospective purchaser continues his/her silence since my last offer.

I am reasonably confident I should be of the opinion he/she has either slithered back under his/her rock or re-joined his/her mates floating around the edge of the local cess pool.

In closing and on the matter of Paypal, I assume all are aware they snip in the order of 2.5% commission for the use of their service, which can amount to a fair whack.
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Follow Up By: Bazooka - Friday, Jan 17, 2014 at 13:14

Friday, Jan 17, 2014 at 13:14
Paypal fees only apply to the seller of course and the convenience and relative security obviously appeals to a lot of people - both merchants and buyers. Large transactions attract lower fees and include CC charges afaik. Reading some of this you'd think Paypal has no checks and balances against scams and fraud. This is clearly incorrect.

Recently had a problem with non-arrival of goods from China (they eventually turned up well after I'd lodged a dispute. Apparently they'd been holidaying in Singapore along the way). Paypal refunded me the $42 out of their contingency fund, having determined the bona fides of both seller and buyer. Mind you their communication during the dispute was very poor and I've told them so - unlike the one other time I've had to contact them about a scammer in Europe (claiming to be in Perth with Australian goods) who had picked off a number of people before and after I smelt something fishy and did some online checking. On that occasion their response and communication was 100%.
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Reply By: Shaker - Friday, Jan 17, 2014 at 09:47

Friday, Jan 17, 2014 at 09:47
The thing that I fail to understand with online & mail order purchase is, why is the purcahser always the one put at risk????

The vendor knows exactly what he is going to receive, money, whereas the purchaser is 100% reliant on the vendors description, such as, is it really new? Is it damaged? Does it work? More importantly .....does it exist??
Why aren't the goods sent first, approved by the purchaser as being as described & then paid for, what is the difference between seeing money in an account & waiting for it to show as clear funds or receiving goods & making sure that they fit or operate as described?

Why is it universally accepted for the purchaser to be put at risk instead of the vendor?

AnswerID: 524654

Follow Up By: pop2jocem - Friday, Jan 17, 2014 at 11:46

Friday, Jan 17, 2014 at 11:46
Call me old fashioned but this is exactly why I don't buy anything that costs more than a few hundred dollars sight unseen.
Yeah, maybe I am paying a premium but at least I know the item and it's seller actually exist and if after an inspection I still get sold a pup it's no ones fault but my own.
I'm a great believer in the old "cash and carry" method (:-))
My son wanted to buy a solar panel and regulator off someone here in Perth and he was working and living in the NW at the time. Saw the ad on Gumtree.
I went around with my multi meter and a battery, hooked the panel up and checked that the whole setup worked. All good, handed over the cash and collected the item. Simple.

Cheers
Pop
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FollowupID: 806403

Reply By: Ron N - Friday, Jan 17, 2014 at 15:32

Friday, Jan 17, 2014 at 15:32
Rosco - Tell him to email you a scanned copy of his Australian MDL for ID. Problem solved. [;-)

Cheers, Ron.
AnswerID: 524677

Follow Up By: Member - Rosco from way back - Friday, Jan 17, 2014 at 15:39

Friday, Jan 17, 2014 at 15:39
G'day Ron

Good idea mate, but I've not heard from him since I suggested that dirty word "cash".
Looks like he's gone off looking for another sucker to scam.
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FollowupID: 806429

Follow Up By: Ron N - Friday, Jan 17, 2014 at 17:17

Friday, Jan 17, 2014 at 17:17
Yes, they're keen as mustard, these scammers, they never stop.
I've had a heap of bank scam emails this week, it must be time to ramp up operations in scam-world.

One was so cleverly-arranged, they very nearly caught me out for a few seconds.
It was a Westpac "your e-statement is ready" email. It was particularly well done, the English spelling was perfect. However the "click this link" part, woke me up.

Not all the scammers have black skins, there's plenty of Eastern Europeans who specialise in it.
Romanians and Russians are big leaders in this field.
There's a remote city in Romania nicknamed "scam central" - it's a real eye-opener to read about the vast sums of money involved in scamming.

http://www.wired.com/magazine/2011/01/ff_hackerville_romania/all/
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FollowupID: 806441

Follow Up By: Member - Rosco from way back - Friday, Jan 17, 2014 at 19:20

Friday, Jan 17, 2014 at 19:20
You're right there Ron. I made mention earlier about the possibility our Slavic friends could be involved, however I must be careful with my terminology ;o)
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FollowupID: 806451

Follow Up By: Ron N - Friday, Jan 17, 2014 at 21:30

Friday, Jan 17, 2014 at 21:30
Rosco - It's been a while since I viewed that link page that I put up, about Romanian scammers.

I've now noticed that the comments page on that article has been ramdomly hacked in nearly every second paragraph - and link words inserted, that if clicked on, lead to scam websites!

No doubt, the Romanians are getting even for the expose!

Cheers, Ron.
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FollowupID: 806463

Follow Up By: rainer - Saturday, Jan 18, 2014 at 10:54

Saturday, Jan 18, 2014 at 10:54
So you have finally identified who the scammers are:
people with black skin, romanians and russians. You better believe it.
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FollowupID: 806489

Follow Up By: Ron N - Saturday, Jan 18, 2014 at 12:43

Saturday, Jan 18, 2014 at 12:43
And your point is??? ..................

As they say, if it has feathers like a duck, waddles like a duck, quacks like a duck ..... then it must be ........... a giraffe, according to you.

http://www.dailystar.co.uk/news/latest-news/358279/Romanians-top-UK-crime-list-before-they-ve-even-arrived
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FollowupID: 806507

Reply By: Member - G.T. - Sunday, Jan 19, 2014 at 12:20

Sunday, Jan 19, 2014 at 12:20
C.O.D. ! Regards G.T.
AnswerID: 524739

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