Doing your own mechanical work as the years go by!

Submitted: Tuesday, Jan 21, 2014 at 19:28
ThreadID: 105892 Views:3335 Replies:20 FollowUps:22
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I think age is catching up, when I attempt my own mechanical work these days especially with the deefer!lol, yesterday i fitted two front hub seals,repacked the bearings, and what was a quick simple job a few yrs back turned out to be a struggle this time around.lol.....dropping things, where did iput that spanner", why won't it fit?',
Forgot to buy this' ,head starts to spin when laying underneath to long, .......And the Aches and pains when getting out of bed this morning,.....Now for a few glucosamine , magnesiu,m,and fish oil pills! to keep things going,..need more servicing on myself than the vehicle these days!,..LOL.

Cheers Axle
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Reply By: Member - batsy - Tuesday, Jan 21, 2014 at 19:43

Tuesday, Jan 21, 2014 at 19:43
Axle, know the feelings. Love doing my own work but when one hits one's head three times on the same thing & has a little doze under the car I begin to worry....but not too much as nobody else knows...............
Cheers
Batsy
Every day vertical above ground is a bonus.

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Follow Up By: Axle - Tuesday, Jan 21, 2014 at 19:49

Tuesday, Jan 21, 2014 at 19:49
LoL Batsy,....Forgot to mention the knogin bashin!!!,to much else happening.


cheers.
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Reply By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Tuesday, Jan 21, 2014 at 19:44

Tuesday, Jan 21, 2014 at 19:44
Yep, know the feeling. Its one of the reasons I moved from a 79 series to a 200series - I can do my own servicing, but no longer need to service wheel bearings, timing belts or adjust valve clearances!
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Follow Up By: Axle - Tuesday, Jan 21, 2014 at 19:50

Tuesday, Jan 21, 2014 at 19:50
Lucky Bugger!


Axle.
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Reply By: Member - Bruce C (NSW) - Tuesday, Jan 21, 2014 at 19:46

Tuesday, Jan 21, 2014 at 19:46
Time to give it to the young blokes Axle. That is what I do mainly these days.

Aside from just having spent a couple of years with the brother converting his American imported motor home, we let the experts skin their knuckles these days.

I only change the engine oil and air filter now. I used to love getting into it in the past but I can't think of anything I'd rather not do than my own mechanicals now.

I haven't got all the latest equipment so I figure it is cheaper to give it to someone else who has. Besides at my age I have forgotten more than I knew. LOL

Cheers, Bruce.
At home and at ease on a track that I know not and
restless and lost on a track that I know. HL.

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Follow Up By: Axle - Tuesday, Jan 21, 2014 at 19:54

Tuesday, Jan 21, 2014 at 19:54
Trouble is Bruce the young blokes look at the defender and wonder what the hell it is!..LOL.


Cheers Axle.
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Follow Up By: Member - Bruce C (NSW) - Tuesday, Jan 21, 2014 at 21:04

Tuesday, Jan 21, 2014 at 21:04
I'm hearing you Axle, I'm hearing you.
At home and at ease on a track that I know not and
restless and lost on a track that I know. HL.

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Reply By: Tonyfish#58 - Tuesday, Jan 21, 2014 at 19:48

Tuesday, Jan 21, 2014 at 19:48
Yep - All too true :-)

Regards Tony
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Reply By: Member - Rosco from way back - Tuesday, Jan 21, 2014 at 19:53

Tuesday, Jan 21, 2014 at 19:53
Mate

You forgot to mention all the bark you knock off and the claret dripping all over the place and not having that extra double swivel universal go round corners gizmo that you need to tighten that bloody bolt some design yobbo decided you really didn't need to get at. So off to Repco 'cause they're the only ones stupid enough to open on a Sunday anyway. And then to top it off you spill your bloody stubby 'cause some bastard must have moved the bloody spanner that was right at hand when you put it down.

Like you I'm happy having a potter around with my little projects, but there's a limit.
Nowadays I'd rather put in a few extra hours, shoulder to the wheel and pay someone who hopefully knows what he's doing.

The problem will be a few years down the track when I've got no wheel to apply my shoulder.
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Follow Up By: Axle - Tuesday, Jan 21, 2014 at 20:00

Tuesday, Jan 21, 2014 at 20:00
Lol Rosco!, You must be my double.


Axle.
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Reply By: Steve M1 (NSW) - Tuesday, Jan 21, 2014 at 19:53

Tuesday, Jan 21, 2014 at 19:53
hey Axle,

at least you've had a good crack at it over the years. I find that just as I'm picking up on a bit of knowledge and being able to do my own stuff, I'm losing it at the other end. I'll spend more time trying to find where I've put stuff than actually fixing it. Haven't nodded off under the car yet, though - I don't think.......
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Follow Up By: Axle - Tuesday, Jan 21, 2014 at 20:26

Tuesday, Jan 21, 2014 at 20:26
Yep I've had my share over the years, stuffed up a few times but managed to get it right next time, ..Mate you will spend the rest of your life looking for things that you thought had or have,


Cheers Axle.
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Reply By: Old 55 - Tuesday, Jan 21, 2014 at 20:14

Tuesday, Jan 21, 2014 at 20:14
Don't I know the feeling, doing a cut and polish on my old 80 series ready for sale and I can hardly move today. Still love doing my own work but I have just purchased a 120 Prado and I think it will be going in for major services instead of me gaining more aches and pains.

Cheers Rod
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Reply By: Member - Rosco from way back - Tuesday, Jan 21, 2014 at 20:24

Tuesday, Jan 21, 2014 at 20:24
Mate

This thread got me thinking about a little gem I came across a few years back. Some may have seen it but those of us weekend warriors who haven't may get a chuckle. By the way I just bought myself an el cheapo creeper with a nice padded headrest, so at least when I doze off under the truck I'll be comfy..........................

TOOL DICTIONARY

DRILL PRESS: A tall upright machine useful for suddenly snatching flat metal bar stock, out of your hands so that it smacks you in the chest and flings your beer across the room, splattering it against that freshly painted part you were drying.

WIRE WHEEL: Cleans paint off bolts and then throws them somewhere under the workbench with the speed of light. Also removes fingerprint whorls and hard-earned guitar calluses in about the time it takes you to say, "Ouch...."

ELECTRIC HAND DRILL: Normally used for spinning pop rivets in their holes until you die of old age.

PLIERS: Used to round off bolt heads.

HACKSAW: One of a family of cutting tools built on the Ouija board principle. It transforms human energy into a crooked, unpredictable motion, and the more you attempt to influence its course, the more dismal your future becomes.

VISE-GRIPS: Used to round off bolt heads. If nothing else is available, they can also be used to transfer intense welding heat to the palm of your hand.

OXYACETYLENE TORCH: Used almost entirely for igniting various flammable objects in your shop. Also handy for igniting the grease inside the wheel hub you want the bearing race out of.

WHITWORTH SOCKETS: Once used for working on older British cars and motorcycles, they are now used mainly for impersonating that 9/16 or 1/2 socket you've been searching for the last 15 minutes.

HYDRAULIC FLOOR JACK: Used for lowering an automobile to the ground after you have installed your new disk brake pads, trapping the jack handle firmly under the bumper.

EIGHT-FOOT REDGUM 4x2: Used for levering an automobile upward off a hydraulic jack handle.

TWEEZERS: A tool for removing wood splinters.

PHONE: Tool for calling your neighbour to see if he has another hydraulic floor jack.

GASKET SCRAPER: Theoretically useful as a sandwich tool for spreading mayonnaise; used mainly for getting dog**** off your boot.

E-Z OUT BOLT AND STUD EXTRACTOR: A tool ten times harder than any known drill bit that snaps off in bolt holes you couldn't use anyway.

TWO-TON ENGINE HOIST: A tool for testing the tensile strength on everything you forgot to disconnect.

1/2” SQUARE x 16” SCREWDRIVER: A large pry-bar that inexplicably has an accurately machined screwdriver tip on the end opposite the handle.

AVIATION METAL SNIPS: See hacksaw.

LEAD LIGHT: The home mechanic's own tanning booth. Sometimes called a drop light, it is a good source of vitamin D, "the sunshine vitamin," which is not otherwise found under cars at night. Health benefits aside, it's main purpose is to consume 40-watt light bulbs at about the same rate that 105-mm howitzer shells might be used during, say, the first few hours of the Battle of the Bulge. More often dark than light, its name is somewhat misleading.

PHILLIPS SCREWDRIVER: Normally used to stab the lids of old-style paper-and-tin oil cans and splash oil on your shirt; but can also be used, as the name implies, to strip out Phillips screw heads.

AIR COMPRESSOR: A machine that takes energy produced in a coal-burning power plant 200 kilometres away and transforms it into compressed air that travels by hose to a Chicago Pneumatic impact wrench that grips rusty bolts last over tightened 58 years ago by someone at ERCO, and neatly rounds off their heads.

JIMMY BAR: A tool used to crumple the metal surrounding that clip or bracket you needed to remove in order to replace a 50¢ part.

HOSE CUTTER: A tool used to cut hoses too short.

HAMMER: Originally employed as a weapon of war, the hammer nowadays is used as a kind of divining rod to locate the most expensive parts not far from the object we are trying to hit.

STANLEY KNIFE: Used to open and slice through the contents of cardboard cartons delivered to your front door. Works particularly well on contents such as seats, vinyl records, liquids in plastic bottles, collector magazines, refund checks, and rubber or plastic parts.

BUGGERIT TOOL: Any handy tool that you grab and throw across the garage while yelling "BUGGERIT" at the top of your lungs. It is also the next tool that you will need.

EXPLETIVE: A balm, usually applied verbally in hindsight, which somehow eases those pains and indignities following our every deficiency in foresight.
AnswerID: 524885

Follow Up By: Axle - Tuesday, Jan 21, 2014 at 20:35

Tuesday, Jan 21, 2014 at 20:35
Another couple of years and i'll have all that covered if not already!!

bloody crack up the whole thing ...lol.


Axle.
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Follow Up By: Member - Bruce C (NSW) - Tuesday, Jan 21, 2014 at 21:15

Tuesday, Jan 21, 2014 at 21:15
Hey Rosco, I cracked up at that 2 tonne engine hoist, bloody true, too bloody true. LOL

Cheers, bruce.
At home and at ease on a track that I know not and
restless and lost on a track that I know. HL.

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Follow Up By: Member - batsy - Tuesday, Jan 21, 2014 at 21:22

Tuesday, Jan 21, 2014 at 21:22
Hey Rosco, I think that padded creeper is cheating a bit,if I had one of them I may never come out from under the car.
Cheers
Batsy
Every day vertical above ground is a bonus.

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Follow Up By: Road Warrior - Tuesday, Jan 21, 2014 at 22:25

Tuesday, Jan 21, 2014 at 22:25
Aah yes, Whitworth, something I was forced to learn about in High School and never used since. lol
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Follow Up By: Bob Y. - Qld - Wednesday, Jan 22, 2014 at 01:55

Wednesday, Jan 22, 2014 at 01:55
Thought this one might fit well in your list, Rosco.

Workshop Manual: The publication one refers to, after one breaks an irrepairable part.

Happened to me once. Cracked brush holder on an HT Holden alternator, then read the manual. Good thing Alradite was invented back then!

Bob



Seen it all, Done it all.
Can't remember most of it.

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Follow Up By: Member - Scott M (NSW) - Thursday, Jan 23, 2014 at 12:06

Thursday, Jan 23, 2014 at 12:06
Rosco - your post reminds me of this old chestnut....

A Man's Age -- as Determined by a Trip to Bunnings

You are in the middle of some kind of project around the house --.
Mowing the lawn, putting in a new fence, painting the living room or whatever.
You are hot and sweaty, covered in dust, lawn clippings, dirt or paint.
You have your old work clothes on.
You know the outfit -- shorts with the hole in the crotch, old T-shirt with a stain from
who-knows-what and an old pair of tennis shoes.

Right in the middle of this great home improvement project you realize you
need to run to Bunnings to get something to help complete the job.

Depending on your age you might do the following:

In your 20's:
Stop what you are doing. Shave, take a shower, blow dry your hair, brush your teeth, floss and put on clean clothes.
Check yourself in the mirror and flex.
Add a dab of your favourite cologne because you never know, you just might meet some hot chick while standing in the checkout lane. And you went to school with the pretty girl running the register.

In your 30's:
Stop what you are doing, put on clean shorts and shirt. Change shoes.
You married the hot chick so no need for much else. Wash your hands and comb your hair.
Check yourself in the mirror. Still got it. Add a shot of your favourite cologne to cover the smell.
The cute girl running the register is the kid sister to someone you went to school with.

In your 40's:
Stop what you are doing. Put on a sweatshirt that is long enough to cover the hole in the crotch of your shorts.
Put on different shoes and a hat. Wash your hands.
Your bottle of Brute Cologne is almost empty so you don't want to waste any of it on a trip to Bunnings
Check yourself in the mirror and do more sucking in than flexing.
The hot young thing running the register is your daughter's age and you feel weird thinking she is spicy.

In your 50's:
Stop what you are doing. Put on a hat; wipe the dirt off your hands onto your shirt.
Change shoes because you don't want to get dog crap in your new sports car.
Check yourself in the mirror and you swear not to wear that shirt anymore because it makes you look fat.
The Cutie running the register smiles when she sees you coming and you think you still have it.
Then you remember the hat you have on is from Gold Coast's Bait & Beer Bar and it says, 'I Got Worms.'

In your 60's:
Stop what you are doing. No need for a hat anymore.
Hose the dog crap off your shoes. The mirror was shattered when you were in your 50's.
You hope you have underwear on so nothing hangs out the hole in your pants.
The girl running the register may be cute, but you don't have your glasses on so you are not sure.

In your 70's:
Stop what you are doing. Wait to go to Bunnings until the Chemist has your prescriptions ready, too.
Don't even notice the dog crap on your shoes.
The young thing at the register stares at you and you realize your balls are hanging out the hole in your crotch.

In your 80's:
Stop what you are doing. Start again. Then stop again.
Now you remember you need to go to Bunnings. Go to K-Mart instead and wander around trying to think what it is you are looking for.
Fart out loud and you think someone called out your name.
You went to school with the old lady who greeted you at the front door.

In your 90's & beyond:
What's a bundings ? Something for my garden?
Where am I? Who am I? Why am I reading this?
Did I send it? Did you? Who farted?
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Follow Up By: Member - Rosco from way back - Thursday, Jan 23, 2014 at 12:40

Thursday, Jan 23, 2014 at 12:40
Bastard Scotty ............ you've been reading my biography.
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Reply By: Ross M - Tuesday, Jan 21, 2014 at 20:34

Tuesday, Jan 21, 2014 at 20:34
Axle
You can wrap a incontinence pad around your hand to stop the knuckles from getting damaged, and dosed up with those pills and having the tools hanging from under the Zimmer frame parked beside the ruck it might make it a bit easier. Set brakes on the caster wheels though.
With the seat removed it can carry oil bottles and cooled cask of the favourite, so it should all then be a very enjoyable and satisfying experience until you have to get up again.

Cheers
Ross M
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Follow Up By: Axle - Tuesday, Jan 21, 2014 at 20:51

Tuesday, Jan 21, 2014 at 20:51
AH!, you have ideas, and a imagination like know other Ross....lol.


Cheers
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Reply By: Bazooka - Tuesday, Jan 21, 2014 at 20:45

Tuesday, Jan 21, 2014 at 20:45
Love your have a chat threads Axle. I don't have the knowedge or inclination to do serious mechanical work but I was only thinking the other day how many more years will I be able to do this as I lifted one of my wheels back onto the studs after a third unsuccessful search for a clatter in my rear suspension. Had to extricate myself fairly quickly the first time I got under the truck to do some checking because - wait for it - I started to feel woozy while looking up. My neck muscles were so tight I could barely turn my head more than 45 degrees each side. Daughter (physio on holidays) diagnosed the problem quickly (in case it helps someone else, the muscle is actually "connected" to the eyes, hence the giddiness) and treated me straight away. Only a few thousand more treatments before she's cleared the ledger! Still haven't found my oil sump socket. Took it out of the socket set and put it somewhere in the truck so that it was with me at all times. It is, but blowed if I can remember where!
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Follow Up By: Axle - Tuesday, Jan 21, 2014 at 21:12

Tuesday, Jan 21, 2014 at 21:12
Hi Bazooka,...Ive lost that little flick with a bar trick to shoot the wheel straight on the the studs when they are lined up looking at me.
My neck muscles are like bits of reo rod, probably why I can't see what I'm doing...lol.

Ya probably sitting on that socket!..lol.


Axle.

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Follow Up By: Bazooka - Wednesday, Jan 22, 2014 at 19:29

Wednesday, Jan 22, 2014 at 19:29
"Ya probably sitting on that socket!..lol."

Could be something in that. The better half reckons I'm a bit of a tightarse on occasions.
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Reply By: The Explorer - Tuesday, Jan 21, 2014 at 20:45

Tuesday, Jan 21, 2014 at 20:45
Hi

Reckon this guy could relate to how you feel...

Matainance on our vehicles, is damn near equal to our health issue

though at the time he was ~one year younger than you are now...:)

Cheers
Greg
I sent one final shout after him to stick to the track, to which he replied “All right,” That was the last ever seen of Gibson - E Giles 23 April 1874

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Reply By: Michael ( Moss Vale NSW) - Tuesday, Jan 21, 2014 at 20:51

Tuesday, Jan 21, 2014 at 20:51
Axle! You're only 34yo, What are you going to be like at 60!! ;) Michael
Patrol 4.2TDi 2003

Retired 2016 and now Out and About!

There's time to rest when you're dead,
Get out and do something instead!

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Follow Up By: Axle - Tuesday, Jan 21, 2014 at 21:00

Tuesday, Jan 21, 2014 at 21:00
Hahahahaha!, ..Yeah!, Right Mike,!,....
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Reply By: olcoolone - Tuesday, Jan 21, 2014 at 22:16

Tuesday, Jan 21, 2014 at 22:16
Hate to you Axle you don't have to old to find mechanical work hard........ We ran job applications for field service positions in our service trucks and some of fthe applicants had the right skill and trade qulifications but found it hard to keep up to me and some of our other guys who like me were born in the mid to late 60's..... Theses guys were 10-15 years younger......... Comments like how do i do it, thats hard, thats difficult, can't do it on site, thats heavy and a bunch of other comments.

But it's one thing i think about is how long can i and some of our guys keep going for, as you know working on earthmoving, mining and heavy vehicles takes a lot out of you and you need a different mind set.

Yes dropping things can be a pain especially if you drop something in the belly pan of a Cat D11R or from a Komatsu PC 5500........ You feel every step.

Had a interesting email come through from the IAME about heat stress....... It said be careful with young workers as they don't know their limits....... Middle age know their limits and work accordingly........ Older worker rememberer how they use to worked when they were young and still think they can work the same.
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Follow Up By: pop2jocem - Wednesday, Jan 22, 2014 at 10:55

Wednesday, Jan 22, 2014 at 10:55
olcoolone,
Sounds like you and I come from similar work backgrounds. Don't miss working on the big stuff one little bit. Or the small stuff for that matter.
Now retired and quite happy to let the young guns at Toyota do whatever mystical, magical stuff they do to our car while we read a magazine and have a coffee or three and all covered by fixed price servicing. Luv that warranty too (;=))
Dropping the car off in good casual clothes and coming home with no oil, grease or other fluids adorning my wardrobe and all my bark still attached to my aging body rather than hanging off the sharp end of some bit metal does it for me...LOL.
Now where did I leave them pruning shears??

Cheers
Pop
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Follow Up By: KevinE - Wednesday, Jan 22, 2014 at 21:42

Wednesday, Jan 22, 2014 at 21:42
Ironic really, I had a 48 year old guy sook up & whimp out on me after just 2 hours of what I considered quite easy work on his first day. He went home & I never saw him again.

I guess it goes to show that age doesn't really matter - if you're a sook, you're a sook regardless of how old you are lol!

:=)


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Reply By: Member - Oldbaz. NSW. - Wednesday, Jan 22, 2014 at 08:40

Wednesday, Jan 22, 2014 at 08:40
Yet another cracker post, Axle, & well supported by Rosco & others...good stuff gents.
Long gone are the days I could swap a piston in the old Peugeot before morning tea,
while the childbride changed a wheel in her tennis dress & remained blemish free.
Now its a job getting the bonnet up & damn exhausting checking the wheelnuts.
And how come that nut is always that 15mm size & I broke the spanner last week ?
Once I'd flick the new wheel on the hub with a bare big toe...now its gutbusting using
all available limbs.
However, using the same medications as Axle, I remain calm & plod on....
cheers.....oldbaz.
AnswerID: 524903

Reply By: mike39 - Wednesday, Jan 22, 2014 at 08:45

Wednesday, Jan 22, 2014 at 08:45
I do all my own mechanical work, have seen too many stuffups from the dealership "experts" to have any faith.

But I know how you feel Axle, have just done front wheel bearings, pads, replaced 4 shocks, changed gearbox, t/c and diff oils on my 75 series trayback ready for this years winter work trip.

Will be 77 next, crook knee, working in 30+ temp. it was no picnic. But the job has to be done, thank goodness for when 4pm. rolls around and some serious "rehydration" can take place.

Just hope I can keep going at this for a few more years, its a bugger when one thinks about how little time is left to do all the things one still wants to do.
mike



AnswerID: 524904

Follow Up By: Member - Boo Boo (NSW) - Wednesday, Jan 22, 2014 at 09:09

Wednesday, Jan 22, 2014 at 09:09
I know, I know.

I'm clearing the block of very large rocks next week and would much rather change oil and filters. LOL

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Reply By: The Bantam - Wednesday, Jan 22, 2014 at 11:17

Wednesday, Jan 22, 2014 at 11:17
First. we need to understand when we are older, we need to do more than what we need to do in the way of exercise to keep the body able to do what we need to do.

The other thing is we need to change the way we do things.
We need to plan better, and use aids baught and contrived to do stuff we no longer can..and realy never should have in the first place.

For example buy or hire the gearbox jack, rather than tryng to get it in there on a scateboard and grunt it in by hand.

Bigger, taller, stronger jack stands can get the vehicle that extra 2 inhes higher, that makes working on hubs a sit down job, rather than a crawl on the ground job.

And of course realise your limits.

I was in the local 4wd shop a while ago.....this "Old bloke" ...a bit older than me......had come down, just to get the nuts on his suspension cracked.
The large mechanic with the long bar, put the 4wd up on the hoist, cracked the nuts and did em up again, and this very capable bloke went home to do his own suspension upgrade.

My brother is 10 years older than me and his knees are buggered.....he's built himself a good strong bench and has some lifting gear.......if he can, he gets whatever it is on the bench and makes a stand up job out of it instead of crawing on the floor to do it.

If we are to continue to do what ever it is.....we must rely on experience and rat cunning rather than strength and enthusiasim.

cheers
AnswerID: 524913

Reply By: Member - Scott M (NSW) - Wednesday, Jan 22, 2014 at 11:42

Wednesday, Jan 22, 2014 at 11:42
Mind you - all this "I get someone else to do it" works well until you're broken down in the middle of woop-woop :-)

40 series = giant meccano set....
AnswerID: 524916

Follow Up By: pop2jocem - Wednesday, Jan 22, 2014 at 18:55

Wednesday, Jan 22, 2014 at 18:55
And that my young friend is why I now carry a sat phone. Mind you if push came to shove I would most probably be able to cobble something together to get me out of the sh1t LOL.
Might be a bit of a hassle if the fuel pump carked it.
I certainly couldn't do it as quickly or easily as I could in my younger days but as long as the Engel is still working all is not lost (;=+)

'91 75 series= slightly later model meccano set.

Cheers
Pop
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Follow Up By: Member - Rosco from way back - Thursday, Jan 23, 2014 at 20:23

Thursday, Jan 23, 2014 at 20:23
The other problem mate is with these new fangled vehicles. Let's say it stops it the middle of no where. Me .... I get out and pop the bonnet ...... yep there's an engine there ...... now what do I do with it????? Air and fuel is about all you can do anything with these days. The rest is up to the tech heads with their computers. Even if you have one of those Scangauge gizmos that'll give you a fault code. What then ........? To a poor sod like me that's about as much good as an ashtray on a motor bike.
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Reply By: TerraFirma - Wednesday, Jan 22, 2014 at 12:53

Wednesday, Jan 22, 2014 at 12:53
Your a good man Axle. Age however does 2 things. It gives you wisdom to overcome the handicaps that Age places on your physical ability. The trick off course is to recognise that your mind thinks the idea is a great one but your body disagrees. Wisdom says take your time and only undertake the work when you are in the mood and are feeling fit and have plenty of patience. Ignore Wisdom at your own peril or take a risk with a young know it all mechanic who'll do it for you for a slab or 2..!
AnswerID: 524924

Reply By: Robin Miller - Wednesday, Jan 22, 2014 at 14:41

Wednesday, Jan 22, 2014 at 14:41
Keeps you fit and mind active Axle - make sure you change the wheel set every week to maximize on/off road performance , another long weekend is almost here and off we go again - this time we will be on a track I gave up on last time - so sure to need a bit of extra servicing with a hammer next tuesday.
Robin Miller

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Reply By: Member Bushy 04(VIC) - Wednesday, Jan 22, 2014 at 17:40

Wednesday, Jan 22, 2014 at 17:40
Hi Axle, old age has not only caught up its bloody well overtaken me.
Tried to do an oil change on the wife's car, and had to go to the handbook just to find the oil filter.
Now what was I taking about?
Told ya,
Bushy.
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