Nitrogen filled tyres?

Submitted: Friday, Jan 31, 2014 at 11:59
ThreadID: 106024 Views:2606 Replies:9 FollowUps:11
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Can anyone shed some light on the benefits of nitrogen filled tyres? I've heard companies like Roadstar have them on their vans and just wondered if anyone had any experiences with it or could tell me what affect it has?
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Reply By: Echucan Bob - Friday, Jan 31, 2014 at 12:12

Friday, Jan 31, 2014 at 12:12
Sue,

I use an 80% nitrogen blend. It works for me, and there is an almost unlimited supply wherever I go :-)

Bob
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Follow Up By: Member - Oldbaz. NSW. - Friday, Jan 31, 2014 at 12:18

Friday, Jan 31, 2014 at 12:18
Now there's a coincidence, that' s what I use too..:)))))...oldbaz.
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Follow Up By: Michael ( Moss Vale NSW) - Friday, Jan 31, 2014 at 16:56

Friday, Jan 31, 2014 at 16:56
I use a 82/18 blend! You guys obviously live at sea level! :) Michael
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Reply By: scruffy - Friday, Jan 31, 2014 at 12:26

Friday, Jan 31, 2014 at 12:26
Less heat buildup and less air lost through bleeding through the tyre. Bob
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Reply By: Brian 01 - Friday, Jan 31, 2014 at 12:31

Friday, Jan 31, 2014 at 12:31
Nitrogen is lighter than both notes and coins, so it follows that your load will be lighter once you fill the tyres with Nitrogen.
Seriously though, the benefits are doubtful at best.
If you do fill with Nitrogen and then intend to adjust the pressures for offroad work etc, how do you then do that without carrying a spare nitrogen supply with you?
Most of the claimed benefits can be achieved with normal air by ensuring the air that you put into your tyres is dry.
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Reply By: Mikee5 - Friday, Jan 31, 2014 at 13:03

Friday, Jan 31, 2014 at 13:03
As Bob and Oldbaz alluded to air is 80% nitrogen anyway, so even if you fill with air and the other 20% all leaks out, when you top up with air again you will end up with 96% nitrogen for free -
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Reply By: Member - Frank P (NSW) - Friday, Jan 31, 2014 at 13:29

Friday, Jan 31, 2014 at 13:29
Google is your friend.

Try "why is nitrogen used in tyres" and go to http://getnitrogen.org/why/
FrankP

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Follow Up By: Hilux fan - Friday, Jan 31, 2014 at 14:41

Reply By: flyingfrenchman - Friday, Jan 31, 2014 at 15:03

Friday, Jan 31, 2014 at 15:03
Unless you are going to be driving in large temp variations (snow to desert) regularly it would seem unnecessary. It's all about avoiding adiabatic changes in pressure from temp. That's why commercial jets that can be on 50 deg Tarmac and minus 50 deg half an hour later in cruise use it in tyres to maintain a reasonable pressure. Incidentally they also use it to inert unused fuel tanks.

Cheers
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Follow Up By: Member - Jack - Friday, Jan 31, 2014 at 18:01

Friday, Jan 31, 2014 at 18:01
I just*** hate*** those adiabatic changes.

Jack
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Follow Up By: Ross M - Friday, Jan 31, 2014 at 19:28

Friday, Jan 31, 2014 at 19:28
Those b%@@&y adiabats are always changing things.
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Reply By: Ross M - Friday, Jan 31, 2014 at 16:01

Friday, Jan 31, 2014 at 16:01
It makes money for the caravan supplier.
If they filled the tyres with air then they can't charge as much.
All tyre service places usually use that stuff filled with air.
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Reply By: RobAck - Friday, Jan 31, 2014 at 18:19

Friday, Jan 31, 2014 at 18:19
If you check with your motoring organisation I suspect you will find a low level of support. Great for motor racing and the truck industry but a complete waste of time for normal users. If you own a 4Wd and regularly change your tyre pressures as you should then its a complete waste of money except for the marketers

Rob
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Follow Up By: Member - PJR (NSW) - Saturday, Feb 01, 2014 at 07:55

Saturday, Feb 01, 2014 at 07:55
I have to agree. I just went up and down this thread and I am positive that not many seem to go off the beaten track. I ma fairly sure that you wouldn't get any nitrogen to fill the flat from Maree, Bridsville, Finke or even Oodnadatta. Do you all seem to stay on the bitumen?

I wouldn't touch it with a barge poll. Absolutely none where we (and the club) go. Even had an issue with a bloke with LPG. On a club trip, came across a road closed and had to do a 238 Km detour because he didn't have enough LPG to get home the detour way.

Not for us thanks.

Phil
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Follow Up By: howesy - Saturday, Feb 01, 2014 at 20:57

Saturday, Feb 01, 2014 at 20:57
at last some common sense,, agree complete waste of time for users who are constantly changing pressures for surfaces. but if you insist I can also sell you rocking horse **** for the garden. :-)
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Follow Up By: Member - PJR (NSW) - Saturday, Feb 01, 2014 at 21:31

Saturday, Feb 01, 2014 at 21:31
I have some gnomes. That's pronounced with a "GGG" a break and then "nomes".

Thanks for the offer.

Phil
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Reply By: Member - johnat - Friday, Jan 31, 2014 at 22:47

Friday, Jan 31, 2014 at 22:47
Sue,
I asked Jayco about this, and (as expected) they obfuscated, but eventually came back with the second best effort "our tyre suppliers recommend it" line.

Simply put, they suggest that you deflate and reinflate with normal air if required, but get Nitrogen fill as soon as practicable.

My call? Total Wank!

As mentioned elsewhere, the airlines use it because it gives better cooling on landing, trucking industry use it because of the huge number of , km they put on a set, and there are SOME benefits in reduced leakage.
Bottom line - bugger it, just use what is free at most servo's, or even cheaper if you've got your own compressor!
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Follow Up By: Jarse - Wednesday, Feb 05, 2014 at 16:19

Wednesday, Feb 05, 2014 at 16:19
Dunno about cooling on landing. Mostly used because it's dry (free of moisture, which can freeze in flight, creating an imbalance). It's also inert.

It's also abundant on the ramp. Engineers use it to charge the various gas struts and pre-charge accumulators as well. That makes it 1 less item to drag around on the ramp by having to provide compressed air.

Save your money :)
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Follow Up By: Brian 01 - Wednesday, Feb 05, 2014 at 17:12

Wednesday, Feb 05, 2014 at 17:12
There are a few reasons that (mostly commercial) aircraft use nitrogen.
1. It does not react volumetrically to changing air pressure due to altitude as much as plain air filled tyres, this prevents expansive blowouts at altitude, malformation of the tyre due to expansion, and auto deflation due to the tyre being expanded off the rim.
2. Nitrogen is a natural fire suppressant which is a necessity to prevent a tyre fire on landing if something goes wrong. Many lower altitude aircraft are only required to have nitrogen filled tyres on the braked wheels for this reason.
3. Nitrogen, being inert, does not react with either the wheel or the tyre material.
4. Filling with nitrogen from a bottle prevents the inadvertent use of locally compressed air which will likely contain moisture. Under extreme landing conditions such as a dragging brake, the tyre can heat to a point that the moisture turns to steam, thus expanding the tyre destructively.
Air that has been satisfactorily dried will not freeze at altitude or turn to steam on landing, so moisture content alone is not a valid reason for the use of nitrogen in place of air.
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Follow Up By: Jarse - Sunday, Feb 09, 2014 at 10:05

Sunday, Feb 09, 2014 at 10:05
Brian,
Not being a smartrrse, but there is some misinformation in your post.

Are you in the industry? ;)
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