3.2 ml triton valve lash

Submitted: Sunday, Feb 09, 2014 at 17:51
ThreadID: 106161 Views:8043 Replies:6 FollowUps:12
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Hi, I have a 2007 3.2 ml triton. I was wondering if anyone could tell me if i remove the fuel lines and rail to take the intake manifold off [as i need to clean the carbon build up] do i need to bleed the fuel lines when i reinstall. i have been told that the pressure in a common rail system is very high and can damage things by trying to bleed air out. I also need to adjust the valve lash while i have it down. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
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Reply By: Ross M - Sunday, Feb 09, 2014 at 19:21

Sunday, Feb 09, 2014 at 19:21
Any work on a common rail diesel should be done with the knowledge, the high pressure if still present in the rail, can cause life threatening velocity diesel spray when a union is undone/loosened. If any spray happens and it hits you it most likely will enter the blood stream causing blood poisoning, irreversible. Death is always later. 20,000psi cuts flesh rather well. 2000psi of a conventional diesel kills if it hits you.

With suitable precautions the system can be undone safely and repairs and adjustments made.

The integrity of the replaced connections is very important to ensure no leaks or the High pressure diesel. Never crack any injector line if running or shortly after running.

The injectors are electronic and system pressure will quickly force air out when the high pressure pump begins to supply.

This is only general info. You need to determine specific safety procedures before doing the work.
AnswerID: 526078

Follow Up By: azzman - Sunday, Feb 09, 2014 at 21:01

Sunday, Feb 09, 2014 at 21:01
Thanks Ross, where could i find out the applicable safety procedures? I am quite familiar with the old school of diesels but do not know much about this newer type of fuel systems, been a long time out of the trade.
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Reply By: Notso - Sunday, Feb 09, 2014 at 22:02

Sunday, Feb 09, 2014 at 22:02
There's also a common problem with the fuel pipes from the rail to the injectors. They can leak and pump fuel into the sump. Can lead to the engine running away and destroying itself. Worth talking to a mechanic at least.
AnswerID: 526096

Reply By: Life Member-Doug T NSW - Sunday, Feb 09, 2014 at 22:08

Sunday, Feb 09, 2014 at 22:08
Why not just add some of that fuel additive that cleans the fuel system, I have used it ever since I got my Troopy WITH 106,000 on the clock , it now shows 781,000 and the engine has not been looked at.


NULON



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AnswerID: 526097

Follow Up By: Ross M - Sunday, Feb 09, 2014 at 22:18

Sunday, Feb 09, 2014 at 22:18
Doug T
azzman wants to remove the pipes so he can adjust the valve clearances.

How will adding fuel additive remove them to give him access? or can it adjust his valves "chemically"?

Bit confused with that one!

Cheers
mydmax
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Follow Up By: Life Member-Doug T NSW - Tuesday, Feb 11, 2014 at 19:54

Tuesday, Feb 11, 2014 at 19:54
Hmmm thats odd Ross, I could have sworn I seen the text as

(((((( [as i need to clean the carbon build up] )))))))


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Follow Up By: awill4x4 - Tuesday, Feb 11, 2014 at 22:26

Tuesday, Feb 11, 2014 at 22:26
You could put a 44 gallon drum of it through the fuel system but it won't clean anything in the inlet manifold as it goes direct to the cylinder.
The pics below tells exactly why those of us with modern diesels that run factory EGR valves for emission control need to clean the inlet manifold out every now an then.
Regards Andrew.





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Follow Up By: azzman - Wednesday, Feb 12, 2014 at 15:31

Wednesday, Feb 12, 2014 at 15:31
Thanks guys, I need to do both jobs de carbon and adjust valves. Thanks for the pics. The motor seems to miss a little, when I drive down the Hume at 110kmh and then back into the 100kmh zone it will start to miss a bit. and do it for a few day after, then it will resume normal operation. I have been wondering if the carbon build up in the manifold would cause this problem. it's got 160,000kms on it and other than normal servicing has had nothing else done.
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Follow Up By: Member - nick b - Wednesday, Feb 12, 2014 at 20:57

Wednesday, Feb 12, 2014 at 20:57
I think you will be amazed when you open it azzman if it haznt been cleaned up before ..... thick black sludge !!
must help the running !!
Cheers Nick b
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Reply By: John and Regina M - Sunday, Feb 09, 2014 at 22:38

Sunday, Feb 09, 2014 at 22:38
Please do not touch the high pressure lines. They are deadly if u are not trained.
AnswerID: 526100

Follow Up By: azzman - Monday, Feb 10, 2014 at 08:50

Monday, Feb 10, 2014 at 08:50
Thanks John and regina M, I am a former diesel mechanic but have had little to do with common rail fuel systems as I have been out of the trade for a long time and worked Manley on earth moving gear with old school diesel fuel systems. This is why I am trying to find out all the corresponding info first. Any information that you can give is greatly appreciated.
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Follow Up By: Shaker - Monday, Feb 10, 2014 at 12:36

Monday, Feb 10, 2014 at 12:36
Being an old school diesel mechanic probably only gives you a small head start over a person with good mechanical knowledge in regard to modern common rail systems.
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Follow Up By: azzman - Monday, Feb 10, 2014 at 16:00

Monday, Feb 10, 2014 at 16:00
thanks shaker, not sure what you mean by your comment. Old dogs can learn new tricks.
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Follow Up By: Shaker - Monday, Feb 10, 2014 at 18:04

Monday, Feb 10, 2014 at 18:04
I meant that you would need almost as much retraining as a young dog!
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Reply By: Honky - Monday, Feb 10, 2014 at 11:46

Monday, Feb 10, 2014 at 11:46
I would try the newtriton forum as very helpfull

Honky
AnswerID: 526130

Reply By: Member - nick b - Monday, Feb 10, 2014 at 21:18

Monday, Feb 10, 2014 at 21:18
azzman : I have just removed my fuel lines , did not have any such problems as mentioned , when it comes to restart / bleeding these motors are dead easy , just pump the plunger at the fuel filter till it goes hard , you don't need to undo anything except maybe the bleeder on the filter housing but that's more for the filter change , kick it in the guts .... :-) PS the fuel line can only be remove a number ??? of times .
As for the high pressure, didn't know about this, had no problem , read & asked a lot on newtriton forum ???? , so you could have a look there too or the pajero forum.
Cleaning out the carbon by removing the manifold i think would be best option , i gave the spray a go :-( So this is what i did ..... good luck with yours .... cheers
Cheers Nick b
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Follow Up By: azzman - Wednesday, Feb 12, 2014 at 15:37

Wednesday, Feb 12, 2014 at 15:37
Thanks Nick B, i have been told that you need to let the motor sit stopped for a while to allow the high pressure side of the fuel system to bleed down before you crack any lines. Did you do that or just into it?
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Follow Up By: Member - nick b - Wednesday, Feb 12, 2014 at 21:45

Wednesday, Feb 12, 2014 at 21:45
I made an inquire to someone on the triton forum , and much the some as you say , no real problem ......
some..... a bit over stated ......extreme view .... IMO .
Cheers Nick b
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