Have you ever got yourself into a situation you can't get out of

Submitted: Sunday, Feb 16, 2014 at 07:59
ThreadID: 106256 Views:3716 Replies:15 FollowUps:41
This Thread has been Archived
And I mean you, not the car or with your girlfriend ?

This weekend I was reminded of a situation some years ago when I stuck my hand down past radiator and carefully reached a bolt and then found I could not retract my hand.

I called out a few times but family was watching a movie and I reckon I was there for nearly an hour before someone came and helped.

This weekend though I was making a new 4wd track thru heavy tea tree about 15ft high and was cutting down about the 20th tree which I expected to fall gently in a certain direction.

Usually they come down softly as tea tree has several main trunks and is very bushy.

This particular one though sort of came down gently on me , this is no real issue normally as they aren't real heavy.

Anyway next minute I found myself sitting on ground covered in tea tree.

No big deal, just a few scratches but as I went to push it up and away, it didn't move.

Admittedly I was exhausted at the time, but suddenly realized where I had under estimated things.

For the first time it weeks it had just rained heavily and its the type of bush that really holds water and probably doubled its weight and was just to heavy to move.

Sat there for a while , still had the chainsaw in my hands and it was still going (small miracle) so I carefully cut away some small branches whilst sitting on ground with this thing pinning me down.

I got lots of sympathy, but the camera I always carry didn't come off so well so no pics.
Robin Miller

Member
My Profile  Send Message

Back Expand Un-Read 0 Moderator

Reply By: AlbyNSW - Sunday, Feb 16, 2014 at 08:15

Sunday, Feb 16, 2014 at 08:15
You could of posted this in Fridays funnies lol
AnswerID: 526541

Follow Up By: Robin Miller - Sunday, Feb 16, 2014 at 08:41

Sunday, Feb 16, 2014 at 08:41
Your right Alby - or maybe would have been a good story for this weeks Coffee Club meeting.
Robin Miller

Member
My Profile  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 808752

Reply By: KevinE - Sunday, Feb 16, 2014 at 09:54

Sunday, Feb 16, 2014 at 09:54
You dodged a bullet Robin! ;)
AnswerID: 526546

Follow Up By: Robin Miller - Sunday, Feb 16, 2014 at 10:08

Sunday, Feb 16, 2014 at 10:08
Maybe Kevin.

Actually I re-read my thread , I made a mistake.

It should have read "I got no Sympathy"
Robin Miller

Member
My Profile  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 808758

Follow Up By: KevinE - Sunday, Feb 16, 2014 at 15:00

Sunday, Feb 16, 2014 at 15:00
Have you tried dropping your back cut to slightly below your scarf when felling small trees on your own Robin?

They usually sit tight on the hinge till you either physically shove them off the stump, or pull them over in the direction of the fall with a rope.

I usually work alone & I feel a lot safer dropping trees that way.

Strap cutting works well too, especially on heavily leaning trees & trees with too much weight on one side, but I can't see you being able to bore cut a Tea Tree, the trunk will probably be too narrow.


0
FollowupID: 808801

Follow Up By: Robin Miller - Sunday, Feb 16, 2014 at 18:03

Sunday, Feb 16, 2014 at 18:03


Good idea Kevin but probably wouldn't work in this case.

The picture isn't very good but its this type of bush but thicker and higher.

Typical process is to crawl in underneath, hold chainsaw bar within an inch of the ground and make a single flat cut , this way you can immediatly drive forward over the short stump.

But along the lines of what you say you go slowly towards the end of the cut watching for direction of fall.

They don't actually fall to ground because its so thick they just lean over.

Usually works well but I just stuffed up being over tired and failed to take into account the extra weigh with the rain.

Robin Miller

Member
My Profile  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 808825

Follow Up By: KevinE - Monday, Feb 17, 2014 at 10:20

Monday, Feb 17, 2014 at 10:20
Ahh, they're smaller than I imagined Robin!

A Stihl combi tool with a chainsaw attachment, or maybe even a scrub clearing attachment would be my weapon of choice on that stuff if you're going to be doing a lot of it? - much quicker, safer & cleaner (no crawling under bushes) than a rear handled saw methinks.



0
FollowupID: 808884

Follow Up By: Robin Miller - Monday, Feb 17, 2014 at 10:57

Monday, Feb 17, 2014 at 10:57
Hi Kevin

Thanks for thoughts but I think I'm stuck with this approach haven't come up with a better solution yet , and have years worth to do I'm afraid. Other parts of property you can use a tractor and chain but even that struggles - surprisingly the car and a chain is best but you have to keep re-positioning the car and chain espically when by yourself.

Many locals use a bulldozer and have been offered one , but I like to keep things natural and undisturbed as possible.

With care you end up with lovely scenic drives thru tunnel like bush.





In reality you have to get down on your knees, scrape the dirt and small rocks from around the trunk , position and hold chain flat to within an inch with the bushy branches all in your face, it requires fine strong control in an awkward position and you always come out scratched.
Robin Miller

Member
My Profile  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 808889

Reply By: Shaker - Sunday, Feb 16, 2014 at 10:16

Sunday, Feb 16, 2014 at 10:16
The lesson to be learnt here is, never get over confident with chain saws, or any power tool for that matter.
I was fixing out a house once & got over confident brushing away the offcuts off my drop saw, almost lost the end of a finger, ever since I have treated it with a new found respect.
Chain saws & 9" angle grinders have always had my utmost respect!


AnswerID: 526552

Follow Up By: Robin Miller - Sunday, Feb 16, 2014 at 11:04

Sunday, Feb 16, 2014 at 11:04
Your right Shaker - I for example have never been game to own a 9" grinder, mainly because I can't over power it with 1 hand if something goes wrong.

For similar reason I always use my light weight and less powerful chain saw.

You got me thinking as I put up a post recently about the new 36v chainsaw. I didn't think about it then but unlike my petrol chainsaw I presume it probably stops completely when finger is off the throttle.

must find out !
Robin Miller

Member
My Profile  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 808766

Follow Up By: Member - Andrew & Jen - Sunday, Feb 16, 2014 at 11:26

Sunday, Feb 16, 2014 at 11:26
Spot on Robin

Glad there were no injuries.

Although I have 2 petrol chainsaws, I have just bought an electric one. Actually 2 electric ones, a pole saw which is very handy and saves climbing ladders or trees and a small electric one for quick jobs around the place. With 45mins running time between charges, it will be enough for those small jobs where it is a pain to get the petrol one primed and ready.

And the big thing for me is safety - finger off the trigger, everything stops and no hot exhausts, etc

Once I get more of an idea about the capability of the chainsaw, I may well take it with me when camping, as much of the small stuff across the tracks should be well within its capability (15cm diam) if taken relatively slowly.

Cheers
Andrew
0
FollowupID: 808770

Follow Up By: Robin Miller - Sunday, Feb 16, 2014 at 11:38

Sunday, Feb 16, 2014 at 11:38
What sort did you get Andrew - I recently reviewed a McCullock and it was good - noticed Aldi selling a 36v one also but I wonder about its performance.
Robin Miller

Member
My Profile  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 808772

Follow Up By: Member - Andrew & Jen - Sunday, Feb 16, 2014 at 17:23

Sunday, Feb 16, 2014 at 17:23
Robin

I got the Ryobi 18v as it was part of the ONE+ group of electric tools. It is not a commercial unit but suits my purpose well as it has the same battery charger as the little vacuum cleaner (a good little unit with plenty of suction) and the pole saw. With the 254mm bar it will cut up to 228mm.

But if I am going out for a firewood cutting session, I take the petrol ones.

Cheers
Andrew
0
FollowupID: 808816

Follow Up By: Member - johnat - Sunday, Feb 16, 2014 at 20:21

Sunday, Feb 16, 2014 at 20:21
I have had a succession of Ryobi tools, most of which have died because of their frigging useless batteries! It is hoped that the more recent ones (the One+ models) have a better battery system than their earlier 12 and 18V models. (Anyone know of a good use for 12v drills without functional batteries?)
0
FollowupID: 808844

Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Sunday, Feb 16, 2014 at 20:39

Sunday, Feb 16, 2014 at 20:39
Sure John........ chuck the battery away and solder a pair of leads to the drill's battery contacts, battery clips on the other end and you have a tool that you can use directly from the car battery. I carry one.
Cheers
Allan

Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 808848

Follow Up By: Member - Andrew & Jen - Monday, Feb 17, 2014 at 10:09

Monday, Feb 17, 2014 at 10:09
johnat
I looked into the battery question and it would seem, from all accounts, that the new lithium ion battery packs Ryobi use give good service.
Battery technology has really developed markedly over the last decade.
Time will tell, I guess, as always :-)
Cheers
Andrew
0
FollowupID: 808882

Follow Up By: Pete Jackman (SA) - Monday, Feb 17, 2014 at 19:47

Monday, Feb 17, 2014 at 19:47
When I was landscaping we used a stihl pole pruner for bushy or prickly stuff. You could reach right into the middle of stuff like that and flatten it without getting scratched.
Any mug can be uncomfortable out bush

Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 808983

Follow Up By: yarda - Wednesday, Feb 19, 2014 at 17:41

Wednesday, Feb 19, 2014 at 17:41
Hey Robin, I used to work with 3 phase 9 inch grinders, it busted your can just to pick it up, let alone hang onto the mongrel.
Scared ? -hell yes LOL.

Nice looking property, great job of retaining the ambience.
0
FollowupID: 809173

Reply By: Member - Andrew - Sunday, Feb 16, 2014 at 10:21

Sunday, Feb 16, 2014 at 10:21
Many years ago an old farmer I knew had the habit of jumping off the tractor to open gates and letting the tractor follow him through in first gear so he wouldn,t have to get on and off. Old habits developed fron feeding out on your own. Wet this day and he was a bit slow in the mud. Tractor was almost past him when he slipped after realising it wasn't going straight through the gate. He ended up trapped between the tractor body and the rear mudguard with the back wheel trying to climb the gate post. He couldn't reach the stop button or the clutch. The mud that caused the problem lubricated the tyres and the tractor stayed in place skidding against the fence fence for an hour until someone came looking for him.
Very tired and scared but very lucky he didn't get crushed or dragged under.

Never tried that again.

regards A
AnswerID: 526553

Follow Up By: racinrob - Sunday, Feb 16, 2014 at 10:57

Sunday, Feb 16, 2014 at 10:57
Memories of Malcolm Douglas, you can get too complacent.

Rob.
0
FollowupID: 808764

Follow Up By: MUZBRY- Life member(Vic) - Sunday, Feb 16, 2014 at 10:58

Sunday, Feb 16, 2014 at 10:58
And Barry Cable..
Muzbry
Great place to be Mt Blue Rag 27/12/2012

Lifetime Member
My Profile  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 808765

Follow Up By: Robin Miller - Sunday, Feb 16, 2014 at 11:23

Sunday, Feb 16, 2014 at 11:23
That would indeed by terrifying Andrew.

Malcolm's seemed just so wrong - haven't heard of Barry cable one Muz.
Robin Miller

Member
My Profile  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 808769

Follow Up By: MUZBRY- Life member(Vic) - Sunday, Feb 16, 2014 at 11:34

Sunday, Feb 16, 2014 at 11:34
Thursday then..
Muzbry
Great place to be Mt Blue Rag 27/12/2012

Lifetime Member
My Profile  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 808771

Reply By: Axle - Sunday, Feb 16, 2014 at 10:37

Sunday, Feb 16, 2014 at 10:37
G/Day Robin, glad it was a small tree ..lol.,..Got jammed under the daughters suby one time, near got to panic stage, ...wont work under any car these days unless its up on ramps

Cheers Axle.
AnswerID: 526556

Follow Up By: Robin Miller - Sunday, Feb 16, 2014 at 11:19

Sunday, Feb 16, 2014 at 11:19
Good point Axle.

Actually when writing this I had in mine a friend who was working under his car using hydrualic jack to hold it, and I noticed the jack every so slower losing height.

I always throw at least a spare wheel under the chassis rails as a backup.


Robin Miller

Member
My Profile  Send Message

1
FollowupID: 808768

Reply By: MUZBRY- Life member(Vic) - Sunday, Feb 16, 2014 at 10:57

Sunday, Feb 16, 2014 at 10:57
Gday Robin
You'r getting a bit like Bear Grills , I think you need an off sider for these dangerous trips you embark on. Someone to clap and cheer, or maybe to take a few good photos while you are stuck under things .



Muzbry
Great place to be Mt Blue Rag 27/12/2012

Lifetime Member
My Profile  Send Message

AnswerID: 526560

Follow Up By: Robin Miller - Sunday, Feb 16, 2014 at 11:15

Sunday, Feb 16, 2014 at 11:15
Great idea Muz - I tell you what , you do the tree chopping and I will do the photo taking.

We can nut out the details over coffee this thursday.
Robin Miller

Member
My Profile  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 808767

Reply By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Sunday, Feb 16, 2014 at 11:33

Sunday, Feb 16, 2014 at 11:33
Yes Robin, I had near forgotten an incident in my early life as an electrical apprentice.

Crawling under a floor of a building, I tried to slide on my back through an aperture by pushing on a floor joist with my feet. At the end of my leg extension I was not clear of the aperture and could proceed neither forward nor back.

The noise of other trades above drowned my cries for help and I had to wait for about an hour until lunchtime when all went quiet. My tradesman who came down to drag me out was not amused although all the others thought it hilarious and gave me no end of 'helpful' advice!

I cannot imagine what would have happened had I been working alone. I suppose I would be getting very hungry by now!

Cheers
Allan

Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

AnswerID: 526565

Follow Up By: Robin Miller - Sunday, Feb 16, 2014 at 17:37

Sunday, Feb 16, 2014 at 17:37
Your story made me think of Stuart Diver Allan - he was the guy found alive after days in the snow under the Therbo village landslide in 1997.

(I only know that because I happen to watch a special on disasters on TV today.)

I don't think I'm claustrofobick (Have no idea how to spell that) but I would not have been very happy in the hour you spent trapped.
Robin Miller

Member
My Profile  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 808819

Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Sunday, Feb 16, 2014 at 17:42

Sunday, Feb 16, 2014 at 17:42
Got out of an hour's work, didn't I Robin? LOL
Cheers
Allan

Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 808820

Follow Up By: Member - johnat - Sunday, Feb 16, 2014 at 20:25

Sunday, Feb 16, 2014 at 20:25
Robin,

I have heard your cry for spelling help ...

and offer the following .

Claustrophobic - phobic from the word for an irrational fear = phobia

Glad to be of assistance ;)
0
FollowupID: 808845

Reply By: The Bantam - Sunday, Feb 16, 2014 at 12:00

Sunday, Feb 16, 2014 at 12:00
There are a great many situations where people get stuck in situations they can not get out of.
Plenty of people get injured or killed or in legal trouble for the very reason that they can not help themselves.

In modern risk management, many of these situations are recognised.....but there are plenty of people out there who either do not recognise the risks or are prepared to take the chance time after time, till fate and statistics catch up with them.

A friend's father was killed when his quad bike ended up on him....he died they think from a combination of heat stress and asphixiation.

There have been many cases where people have become trapped or helpless in confined spaces.

So often if there was a second person there the situation could have been easily solved or they could have gone for help.


If my friends farther had not been working alone, he would have come home with a few bruses and eaten the lunch left on the table for him.

This is why in so many industries people do not work alone.

A mate of my brother's now makes a full time living as a high risk observer in a power station.
Anytime someone goes into a confined space or works on a live switch board, he is there to make sure the other bloke gets out alive.....he may pass the odd tool or such, but his main task is to stand or sit there and say..."are you all right mate".

Back in the day when I was much skinnier, I got close to getting stuck in a ceiling once or twice.....one time I needed to take off my belt and everything out of my pockets to get out.

There are a lot of people who get "engineered' into situations they cant get out of. This is how many drug mules end up in trouble and lots of people loose their life savings.

A lot of the time it comes down to thinking before doing...a thing so many people just don't do.


cheers
AnswerID: 526567

Follow Up By: The Bantam - Sunday, Feb 16, 2014 at 12:03

Sunday, Feb 16, 2014 at 12:03
As for the girl friend....OH HELL.....there are plenty of people get themselves into situations they can't get out of there..oh hell yeh.

If there where 40 ways to leave you lover.....how come the song only mentions 5....:)

cheers
0
FollowupID: 808777

Follow Up By: Robin Miller - Sunday, Feb 16, 2014 at 13:19

Sunday, Feb 16, 2014 at 13:19
You raise some very good points Bantam and I always try to think through these things afterwards and decide wether I passed of failed.

In this case I came to the conclusion I stuffed up - despite the fact they I always try and do things
such that a single point of failure isn't fatal.

E.G. Never rely on winch - because from my experience 50% of peoples don't work when needed (so always lockers or chains as well).

In this case while working alone where no one would ever come I had a handheld in one pocket and phone in the other
which covers many but not all situations.

Here I failed marked myself for quite a different reason that was avoidable.

I was exhausted and didn't need to be.

The bushy tree probably was less than a distributed 500kg and if not tired out I should have been able to deflect its slow downward progress.

Instead it just slowly sat me on the ground and I didn't have strength to move it.

P.S. The song was written by a girl and most of the ways to escape were removed just to ensure your life long servitude.
Robin Miller

Member
My Profile  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 808788

Follow Up By: Hilux fan - Friday, Feb 21, 2014 at 14:28

Friday, Feb 21, 2014 at 14:28
"A mate of my brother's now makes a full time living as a high risk observer in a power station.
Anytime someone goes into a confined space or works on a live switch board, he is there to make sure the other bloke gets out alive.....he may pass the odd tool or such, but his main task is to stand or sit there and say..."are you all right mate"."

This lady could have used someone like that.
http://www.abc.net.au/news/2014-02-20/geelong-woman-rescued-after-being-trapped-in-roof-for-four-days/5272396
0
FollowupID: 809336

Follow Up By: Robin Miller - Saturday, Feb 22, 2014 at 18:41

Saturday, Feb 22, 2014 at 18:41
That really was a strange situation Hilux - and probably fits the title of this thread better than any of our other incidents.
Robin Miller

Member
My Profile  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 809397

Follow Up By: The Bantam - Saturday, Feb 22, 2014 at 19:12

Saturday, Feb 22, 2014 at 19:12
And yep, under the current WHS expectations, household ceiling spaces are "confined spaces".

She is not the first and wont be the last to get trapped in or fall thru a ceiling.

I have crawled in my fair share of ceilings, and lett me tell you some of them are pretty hard to get arround in and a few are outright traps.

So few people have any foresight in providing ceiling access.

Myplace has man hole big enough for a fat man, a full length crawl board and a little carrage that runs on it.

cheers
0
FollowupID: 809399

Reply By: Tony H15 - Sunday, Feb 16, 2014 at 15:03

Sunday, Feb 16, 2014 at 15:03
Back in the late nineties the wife and I drove across the GRR. We drove down a track to one of the many waterfalls, had a bit of a look and then headed back to the GRR. On the way back we started up a rather steep hill, half way up I realized I wasn’t going to make it in H4 so grabbed the transfer and commenced shifting into L4. Unfortunately, the dam lever came out in my hand - no great problem except the transfer box was now stuck in neutral. Unable to reinsert the lever and unable to drive the Hilux, I turned the wheels into the side of the hill, turned off the motor, unhitched the camper trailer and using a snatch strap as a safety, managed to roll the camper back a few metres to the side of the track. Once it was safely tucked out of the way into the side of the hill, I started the motor and rolled the Hilux backwards down the hill (not much fun). Once at the bottom I removed the console, reinserted the lever and reinserted the rather bent circlip. Not comfortable with using the lever after that, I left it in H4 and climbed to the top without the trailer. Funnily enough on the way in, I noticed a camper trailer chained to a tree just before the hill and wondered why someone would leave their camper chained to a tree – now I know. Eventually a landcruiser happened by and the driver obliged by towing the camper out for me. 40 degree heat, 50mm of fine bulldust and the wife standing by the side of the track, looking decidedly concerned, all added to the excitement.
AnswerID: 526584

Follow Up By: Robin Miller - Sunday, Feb 16, 2014 at 17:20

Sunday, Feb 16, 2014 at 17:20
You do see some strange hings and wonder at times don't you Tony.

Do you own an automatic now ?
Robin Miller

Member
My Profile  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 808815

Follow Up By: Tony H15 - Sunday, Feb 16, 2014 at 17:54

Sunday, Feb 16, 2014 at 17:54
Yes I have an auto now, not by choice though, the car I have now was only available in an auto so I have to grin and bare it.
0
FollowupID: 808821

Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Sunday, Feb 16, 2014 at 17:58

Sunday, Feb 16, 2014 at 17:58
Oh no Tony, please don't 'bare' it. Certainly not on here anyway. LOL
Cheers
Allan

Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 808824

Follow Up By: Robin Miller - Sunday, Feb 16, 2014 at 19:15

Sunday, Feb 16, 2014 at 19:15
Hi Tony

We are kindred spirits - I have an auto 4800 patrol now because thats all they make since 2006 - kept and ran my manual 4800 patrol side by side with it for 2 years though as I couldn't bare to let it go.

Nearly bought 75% of it back recently as mate got a tray GU 4.2 diesel patrol ripped out the engine and all the junk and put my old manual 4800 petrol engine and whole drive train back into it , even the dash and whole control system.

Robin Miller

Member
My Profile  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 808832

Reply By: Member - ken m4 - Sunday, Feb 16, 2014 at 16:30

Sunday, Feb 16, 2014 at 16:30
This thread reminds me of Working in underground coal mines where statutory inspections were required of finished workings on a weekly or less frequent interval. Due to the Strata, possible water ingress and atmospheric conditions a statutory official had to carry out inspections of these areas with an experienced miner at the least. Manning levels dictated that some of these inspections were done by the statutory official on his own. The possible safety ramifications of single person inspections led to the quarantining of these areas.
AnswerID: 526594

Follow Up By: Robin Miller - Sunday, Feb 16, 2014 at 19:18

Sunday, Feb 16, 2014 at 19:18
Sounds like no room for mistakes there Ken.
Robin Miller

Member
My Profile  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 808834

Reply By: Erad - Sunday, Feb 16, 2014 at 16:41

Sunday, Feb 16, 2014 at 16:41
Yes - I have got myself into stupid situations many times, and fortunately got out safely. Reading Robin's account of confined spaces reminds me of an earlier life, when I was designing the mechanical works for a Hydro station in Thailand. The Contractor had offered to supply a governor receiver vessel with an oval manhole which measured 350 mm wide by 200 high. I refused to allow this because I reckoned that there was no way a man could get inside the vessel to maintain the oil inlet valve - even a Thai man. Anyway, they sent me a photo showing a man (Japanese) inside the vessel holding the dismantled inlet valve. Whether they put him inside it and then welded the vessel up or not, I don't know, but that is a very small manhole.
AnswerID: 526595

Follow Up By: Robin Miller - Sunday, Feb 16, 2014 at 17:18

Sunday, Feb 16, 2014 at 17:18
Gee I bet we could swap a few good engineering design stories from overseas countries Erad.

You small space story immediately reminded me of film whose name escapes me.

Think it was Steve McQueen in a film set during chinese boxer revolution - he was engineer in a steamboat sailing the chinese river , the engine had a fault and the only way to repair the bearing on the crankshaft was to go inside the crankcase while the big end of that cylinder was as high as possible to just allow a small person in - unfortunately the engine didn't hold at top dead centre and rotated thru the worker inside.

Robin Miller

Member
My Profile  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 808813

Follow Up By: Member - KeithB - Tuesday, Feb 18, 2014 at 12:14

Tuesday, Feb 18, 2014 at 12:14
Years ago we had the annual shutdown and the big steam boiler was opened up for a clean. A fitter managed to squeeze into the steam drum through a tiny man hole only to find that it was a good deal warmer inside than he originally thought.
His body swelled up a little in the heat and he couldn't squeeze back out. Lucky there was a safety observer on hand. We had to play a fire hose on him to shrink the overheated fitter back to normal size.
0
FollowupID: 809054

Reply By: Slow one - Sunday, Feb 16, 2014 at 18:24

Sunday, Feb 16, 2014 at 18:24
This story is a real one of life and death.

I was working away and a mate you owns a company gave us all dress shirts. Now that was fine and nothing in the risk assessment warned of any danger.

His new wife had sent him the shirts and he was one short, so he gave me the shirt his bride had labeled for him as it was my size.

All was good with the nice dress shirt. When I got home a couple of weeks later, my wife prepared the shirt for washing. Now what danger could there be in that. None one would think.

Problem is on checking the pocket, what does she pull out but a bloody pair of lacy girls knickers.

This has now become a life and death situation. How do I explain a pair of frilly knickers not much bigger than a postage stamp in the shirt pocket. At this point there was some mention from my wife about how good she had been at cutting certain things from cattle. Fear is the only thing now that comes to mind

Luckily I lived after a lot of explaining from my friend as to what had transpired.

So! You think all is safe with what you are doing but never cover all angles.


AnswerID: 526604

Follow Up By: Robin Miller - Sunday, Feb 16, 2014 at 19:30

Sunday, Feb 16, 2014 at 19:30
Now Slow one , yours is clearly the closest near death episode but I have to censure you.

I have been separately told via members messages that this thread is being read 1000 times per hour.

If we were to allow wife, girl friend and mistress anecdotes then the Exploroz sever would overload and meltdown !

(P.S. You can however send me any tips you have learnt in that department via encrypted transmission)
Robin Miller

Member
My Profile  Send Message

1
FollowupID: 808837

Reply By: Echucan Bob - Monday, Feb 17, 2014 at 00:33

Monday, Feb 17, 2014 at 00:33
A younger me used to scuba dive. I had a 9 mm two piece wet suit that got a bit tighter each year. The top piece was like a tight skivee with hood and flaps the joined in the crutch. It had long arms. To get it off you had to pull it over your head. Anyway, my arms were stuck, I couldn't breathe, it was half off and stuck over my head, I was panicking.... Still have night mares!!!!
AnswerID: 526637

Follow Up By: Member - Murray M2 - Monday, Feb 17, 2014 at 01:31

Monday, Feb 17, 2014 at 01:31
Am bit worried you were making a new track by cutting down tree's,
if you had to destroy this many , maybe a rethink on how you are going to get where you are intending.

Sorry mate, but this type of "bush bashing" puts a bad thought in my mind.
To me this is the type of 4WDing that makes us look bad.
NO< I am not a greenie just a person that respects the country and the allowances afforded us to travel our great land without destroying it.
I think most 4wd clubs would agree, doing this type of touring will make the Authorities lock us out of more places.
Making new tracks like that tends to upset the Parks and Wildlife peoples. And no I don't work for them, BUT with them. Have found I get to go places becuase of this.
RESPECT THE LAND.
0
FollowupID: 808866

Follow Up By: MUZBRY- Life member(Vic) - Monday, Feb 17, 2014 at 07:25

Monday, Feb 17, 2014 at 07:25
Gday Murray
I think you will find that all those trees are in Robin's back yard . He hadn't left home , just gone to mow the grass.
Muzbry
Great place to be Mt Blue Rag 27/12/2012

Lifetime Member
My Profile  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 808871

Reply By: Bob Y. - Qld - Monday, Feb 17, 2014 at 21:40

Monday, Feb 17, 2014 at 21:40
Robin,

That's been the story of my life.........to a degree. Can think of a couple of ......umm, embarrassing moments.

We were holding cattle on a dam on the Diamantina River road, when I noticed a Noogoora Burr plant just to the right of front wheel, of TT350. Leant over to pluck out the weed, and at the point of no return, felt the bike move with me, and next minute, I'm on the ground, bike next to me and the right side of handle bar across the back of my neck.......and I couldn't move!

One of the kids rode over, and trying not too laugh too much, helped me get out of the wrestling hold the bike had on me. Bet all the laughs were on me, that night in the dining room!

Another time, had to clean the mud out of a 22,000L poly tank. We had to do this regularly, as had to "flock" the mud out of the water, for domestic purposes. No dramas getting into the tank, and sweeping out the mud, but then came the time to climb out!!!

Although I'm 6'2", the tank was about 7'6" high, and while I could grab the edge of the manhole, I didn't have the strength to pull my "too many smokos" weight, up to where I could get an arm, or two through the manhole. Probably spent 30-40 minutes in there before was able to get someone's attention. Even with a flour drum to stand on it was a struggle, so that procedure came up at the next safety meeting.

Glad to hear your altercation was with a ti-tree, and not some old man Ironbark, Robin :-))

Bob

Seen it all, Done it all.
Can't remember most of it.

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

AnswerID: 526692

Follow Up By: Robin Miller - Tuesday, Feb 18, 2014 at 18:44

Tuesday, Feb 18, 2014 at 18:44
Hi Bob

Always find it interesting that one can get trapped on/under a bike.
Have seen it a few times now and you seem helpess and the bikes only 120kg or so.
Even rescued someone from under one on the Simpson.

Makes you feel sort of inadequate but it sure is real enough.

Like me under a big bush - if it had of been an iron bark I would have felt better except I'd probably be dead.

Good to see you survived the tank - you know better than me the trap they can be.




Robin Miller

Member
My Profile  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 809093

Follow Up By: The Bantam - Saturday, Feb 22, 2014 at 19:47

Saturday, Feb 22, 2014 at 19:47
There have been a lot of issues with tanks and wells.

There where 3 bolkes from the same family killed in a well up north some time ago.
These blokes where pumping a well out so they could clean it.....they had but a petrol powered pump down the well.
When the pump stopped, one bloke went down to look at it and colapsed....the second bloke went down to help him and colapsed...the third bloke went down to help the other two.

The forth bloke ( hired help) came back to camp....found no one there.....looked down the well and had the good sence not to go down.




A mate of my bother's sent a couple of his blokes out to do some work on a wind mill.....they climb up the mill...it is usual practice to tie a stout rope to the tower, then wrap a quick hitch arround one of the radial arms as it goes past to stop the mill ........one of them decides that the mill is barely moving so he can stop the sail by grabbing one of the arms....it promtly picks him up off the landing....as the arm he was holding onto got vertical he could no longer hold on... his mate can do nothing and he falls to his death.





On a slightly funnier note......this bloke no doubt wont think its funny.

A bloke I know is working for this bloke and this day he is driving a tractor.
for some reason he gets off and turns the machine off..and like a good boy parks it in gear.

Now for some reason I do not know....he goes to start the tractor without getting on.....so here he is reaching up and hits the button....the tractor beeing well maintained starts first kick.
tractor lurches forward trapping his foot under the tyre....the tractor drives most of the way up one leg and over the other foot and chuggs away into the distance.

Multiple broken bones, months in hospital even more months in rehab and a large compo claim.

It all good now his feet both point in the same direction his legs are the same length everything works and he is well enough to work for the council and be a pretty fair competitive ballroom dancer.


cheers
0
FollowupID: 809400

Reply By: Ali Ree - Wednesday, Feb 19, 2014 at 17:50

Wednesday, Feb 19, 2014 at 17:50
Maybe I've been in this situation for long, it is depressed..
AnswerID: 526816

Sponsored Links

Popular Products (13)