A new animal in Australia

Submitted: Saturday, Feb 22, 2014 at 21:07
ThreadID: 106371 Views:2128 Replies:3 FollowUps:6
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A new marsupial has been discovered here in Australia. Goes to show that not everything is old and not found yet.

Not sure about accuracy of the "newspaper" though. Google search makes it a legitimate online newspaper.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/02/20/marsupial-sexes-itself-to-death_n_4821373.html

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Reply By: disco driver - Sunday, Feb 23, 2014 at 00:03

Sunday, Feb 23, 2014 at 00:03
Many of the small marsupial mice/antechinus species males are known to screw themselves to death.
They expend so much energy mating that the body just shuts down and death occurs.

What they have found is another variety of the antechinus family, which is exciting in itself but the screwing to death is not unique to the ones just found...............if the online newspaper thinks it's to be accurate a bit more research may be required.

Disco.
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Follow Up By: disco driver - Sunday, Feb 23, 2014 at 00:04

Sunday, Feb 23, 2014 at 00:04
A Footnote:
At my age, what a way to go.

Disco.
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Follow Up By: Member - Russler - Sunday, Feb 23, 2014 at 03:40

Sunday, Feb 23, 2014 at 03:40
LOL, at any age, what a way to go.
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Reply By: Member - Joe F (WA) - Sunday, Feb 23, 2014 at 00:20

Sunday, Feb 23, 2014 at 00:20
G'day SDG

Just goes to show that there are still many things, living and not so, yet to be discovered.

A couple of years ago here in the East Pilbara there were two new species of arachnid(s) discovered and named, not too much excitement outside of the spider lovers association though, simply because the discovery was within a multi billion dollar mining operation that is still under construction.

Not sure of the outcome regarding the spider species ~ but the mining operation is going strong !!

Safe travels:
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Follow Up By: get outmore - Sunday, Feb 23, 2014 at 08:04

Sunday, Feb 23, 2014 at 08:04
Why do you think so many discoveries occur on mining leases??
.... there the only ones looking!
Its not like its a co incedence
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Follow Up By: The Explorer - Sunday, Feb 23, 2014 at 11:24

Sunday, Feb 23, 2014 at 11:24
..yeah, there'd very likely be unsubscribed species of invertebrates in your backyard. The main issue with the ones found at potential mine sites is if they are Short Range Endemics's (SRE's) i.e. if they have a small distribution, not so much that they are "new" species.

Typically it has to be demonstrated that any SRE's identified within the bounds of a mines impact area are also present in the wider area, so that they will persist (as a species) despite part of their habitat being removed/altered. This is, generally speaking, not that hard as mines have small footprints, much smaller than the total distribution of most species, but can involve considerable field work.

You can download the WA EPA Guidance statement for the sampling and assessment of SRE invertebrate fauna HERE (PDF download) if you want more information on the subject. There is also other guidance statements specifically related to sampling efforts and methodologies for subterranean fauna.

Cheers
Greg
I sent one final shout after him to stick to the track, to which he replied “All right,” That was the last ever seen of Gibson - E Giles 23 April 1874

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Reply By: Member - John and Val - Monday, Feb 24, 2014 at 17:38

Monday, Feb 24, 2014 at 17:38
A couple more new discoveries (spiders this time) have been reported today, by the ABC. In this link to the article here there is also a link to the antechinus story.
J and V
"Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted."
- Albert Einstein

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Follow Up By: SDG - Monday, Feb 24, 2014 at 18:27

Monday, Feb 24, 2014 at 18:27
It would not surprise me if these or any new discoveries, have been seen or known about by travelers like us, but without us actually realizing that they are previously unknown.
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Follow Up By: The Explorer - Monday, Feb 24, 2014 at 20:12

Monday, Feb 24, 2014 at 20:12
mmm...maybe, maybe not. 1mm spiders are a bit hard to spot :) ..also many new species yet to be discovered are subterranean - unlikely to be seen by "travelers", but yes get your point. You are not going to see much sitting at home.

Cheers
Greg
I sent one final shout after him to stick to the track, to which he replied “All right,” That was the last ever seen of Gibson - E Giles 23 April 1874

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