PVC pipes for water storage

Submitted: Thursday, Mar 06, 2014 at 20:44
ThreadID: 106582 Views:6021 Replies:9 FollowUps:9
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Yes, its been done to the death but as I posted some weeks ago, I'm preparing my Detour motorcycle camper for travelling and need water storage.

I recently had made a battery storage box mounted under the floor. Its on the passenger side of the camper at the rear. The drivers side has a wind down leg. There is the following area left for a tank 740 (L) x 320mm (W) x (150mm) high. This is maximum usage of that area allowing 40mm from the tank to the axle etc.

Searched high and low and cant find a black square tank of thos dimensions hence to make my own.

Emailed the following person to seek if PVC pipes can be used for drinking water-

Hi Tony,

PVC is the most commonly used pipe system by water agencies to deliver safe drinking water to your home so you are not breaking new ground with your proposal.

Whilst the raw materials used to manufacture the pressure pipes (such as the ones bringing water to your home) are the same as those used in the PVC pipes taking waste water away from your house there are additional test requirements placed on the pressure pipes to ensure they meet the Australian Standard 4020 that covers the suitability of materials for contact with drinking water. So to be absolutely sure your installation is suitable for drinking water applications I would suggest you use a pressure pipe manufactured to the Australian Standard as all PVC pressure pipes made to these standards are required to meet AS4020.

The waste water pipes you would commonly get from Bunnings may also be OK but as they are not intended for carrying drinking water the Standard does not require testing to AS4020.

Bunnings may not have pressure pipes in 150mm diameter but your local Trade Link or Reece stores will have these. They will be more expensive than the non-pressure pipes from Bunnings.

Cheers
Mark Hurndell
Heathcote - Executive General Manager
PIPA

So you can use it but obtain the pressure type from Reece or Tradelink that exceeds the Australian Standard.

By the way, my plan is to use two pipes 150mm diameter 700mm long equals about 23 litres. No food safe tank can be found that measures the area 700x300x150mm. The area is directly behind the axle and will assist with balancing of the trailer. Hence making my own.

Cheers. Tony Dawson
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Reply By: Member - Bruce C (NSW) - Thursday, Mar 06, 2014 at 21:02

Thursday, Mar 06, 2014 at 21:02
Conventional sewer pipe is OK for water storage as it is used by many tradesmen and councils and such like authorities as water containers fitted to their utes and trucks for wash ups and drinking.

The area you describe as being available is about the size of one and a half jerry cans. It might be possible to use a 20 litre and a 10 litre plastic jerry can in the space you have available.

Cheers, Bruce.
At home and at ease on a track that I know not and
restless and lost on a track that I know. HL.

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Follow Up By: eaglefree - Thursday, Mar 06, 2014 at 22:04

Thursday, Mar 06, 2014 at 22:04
20 litre is too wide at 340mm have considered it. thanks
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Reply By: Member - Leigh (Vic) - Thursday, Mar 06, 2014 at 21:34

Thursday, Mar 06, 2014 at 21:34
Just a thought but have you considered a water bladder? I bought a bladder from these guys and they have flexibility in their factory to make any configuration. Example below.

http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/Water-bladder-Tanks-100-Ltrs-for-4x4-Camping-Fishing-and-Boating-/321159762684?pt=AU_Car_Parts_Accessories&hash=item4ac69d12fc&_uhb=1
AnswerID: 527789

Follow Up By: eaglefree - Thursday, Mar 06, 2014 at 22:10

Thursday, Mar 06, 2014 at 22:10
Thanks Leigh, I would still need some sort of container to carry it in, rocks and other stuff hitting it yes? And to hold it in place. Also they are 1400mm long. I need half that length but you mention they can do this. Thanks for the option. Its also a light weight option. Weight tare of the camper is 175 kgms. Leaves me 110 for load (max a VW style trike can tow) hence only wanting 25 litres to carry.
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Reply By: Member - Chris_K - Thursday, Mar 06, 2014 at 22:29

Thursday, Mar 06, 2014 at 22:29
It's the only time in my entire life that "Pie r squared" ever became useful...apologies for the description....couldn't find the way to do it on a keyboard...

:)

Chris
AnswerID: 527790

Follow Up By: eaglefree - Thursday, Mar 06, 2014 at 22:53

Thursday, Mar 06, 2014 at 22:53
Chris I only went to year 10. pie R squared I have used so many times in my life and 2 pie R for circumference. Apparently a 150mm pipe 700mm long is about 12 litres. Cant be bothered working it out. lol
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Follow Up By: Member - Bruce C (NSW) - Friday, Mar 07, 2014 at 18:47

Friday, Mar 07, 2014 at 18:47
When I went to tech the decimal equivalent of pie was and still is 3.1416
But for volume of a cylinder the formula is .7854 X D squared. X H. answer will be in cubic whatever you use, metric or imperial.

There are 6.24 Imp. gals in a cubic foot. If you want the metric equivalent you can work it out for yourself, I'm too lazy. LOL

Cheers, Bruce.
At home and at ease on a track that I know not and
restless and lost on a track that I know. HL.

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Follow Up By: Member - johnat - Friday, Mar 07, 2014 at 20:05

Friday, Mar 07, 2014 at 20:05
Pi, please!! Pie is them things you eat at the footy!

PI is a Greek letter, the ratio of the radius of a circle to the circumference - equivalent to 22/7 or approximately 3.14159.
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Follow Up By: Shaker - Saturday, Mar 08, 2014 at 09:55

Saturday, Mar 08, 2014 at 09:55
johnat, I think you will find that pi is the ratio of the diameter of a circle to the circumference, in fact it is a slightly simpler equation to use pi D than 2 pi D for circle area.
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Reply By: Shaker - Thursday, Mar 06, 2014 at 23:05

Thursday, Mar 06, 2014 at 23:05
Go to a plastics fabricator, they will weld you up a plastic tank in no time!

AnswerID: 527792

Reply By: Batt's - Friday, Mar 07, 2014 at 00:07

Friday, Mar 07, 2014 at 00:07
I'm in mackay my house was built in the late 70's I've owned it for 14yrs and it has 1" pvc pipe supplying water from the water meter to the house my neighbour has the same thing so I guise it must be ok to use pvc for drinking water.
AnswerID: 527794

Reply By: Hoyks - Friday, Mar 07, 2014 at 07:14

Friday, Mar 07, 2014 at 07:14
http://www.abbertanks.com.au/

"AbberTanks specializes in custom built water holding tanks for motor homes, trailers, boats and any other vehicles..."

A guy at work got one made up, no idea on price but it would allow you to use the while recess, rather than all the lost space bewteen the pipes.
AnswerID: 527797

Follow Up By: Member - Silverchrome - Friday, Mar 07, 2014 at 08:03

Friday, Mar 07, 2014 at 08:03
Yes I agree....try abbertanks. They will make you a tank any shape or size you require so that you can use every bit of space you have. But of course the odder the shape...the more expensive it would be. Cheers
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Reply By: Member - John and Val - Friday, Mar 07, 2014 at 12:27

Friday, Mar 07, 2014 at 12:27
Hi Eagle,

Worth thinking about stone damage if the polypipe is to be mounted under your trailer floor. We have a trailer that came with a couple of lengths of polypipe mounted under the front of the trailer, for tent pole, fishing rods etc. It apparently survived OK on bitumen for the previous owners, but as soon as we went on to gravel road (or worse) it quickly shattered. Now replaced by a couple of lengths of very heavy duty 100mm black polypipe, but the lighter grey or cream coloured plastic screw type ends still get damaged.

If its your water supply you want to be able to rely on the container.

Cheers,
J and V
"Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted."
- Albert Einstein

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AnswerID: 527825

Reply By: eaglefree - Friday, Mar 07, 2014 at 13:40

Friday, Mar 07, 2014 at 13:40
mmm, Abber tanks sounds like the way to go as I can do an "L" shaped one..

Thankyou for your replies.
AnswerID: 527829

Reply By: Gone Bush (WA) - Friday, Mar 07, 2014 at 13:46

Friday, Mar 07, 2014 at 13:46
It's worth noting that there have been occasions in the past where people with these PVC pipe tanks have been poisoned by the reaction of the glue with the water, in hot outback conditions.

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Follow Up By: eaglefree - Friday, Mar 07, 2014 at 18:14

Friday, Mar 07, 2014 at 18:14
Wonder if its stuck together with green glue as recommended.
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Follow Up By: eaglefree - Friday, Mar 07, 2014 at 18:26

Friday, Mar 07, 2014 at 18:26
Actually I think the Adder tank is the way to go. I have an "L" shaped area but also there are three steel angle pieces running in that area that Adder could make dips in the tank to allow it to be raised 50mm more. With the "L" area utilised it also means a shallower tank say 130mm for about 25 litres. I cant carry more than that anyway. It is also a one off cost and hope to order one with a gooseneck for easy filling with a bucket at any servo, an overflow and tap fitting outlet.
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