The ol blokes would turn over, with the camping gear of to-day.

Submitted: Saturday, Mar 08, 2014 at 19:53
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Makes me laugh , when I think what the ol mans idea of a tent was{ God bless him)

ATarp thrown over someones fence on the side of the road somewhere was the norm!!, no one cared or worried, open fire, kerosene lantern,and a sugar bag with the perishables sitting in a water hole took care of the refrigeration side of things.

Good times where had with out money, and very few conveniances.

How things have changed, The latest phrase is Glamping!!, I believe.

Cheers Axle.
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Reply By: Member - Bruce C (NSW) - Saturday, Mar 08, 2014 at 20:42

Saturday, Mar 08, 2014 at 20:42
Axle my father was the same only he was a bit up market with his tenting. Mind you he had a family to contend with, 4 useless boys, poor sod. LOL.

His tent was exactly like that Oz tent only it has guy ropes etc.

Now back in their day they had primus stoves which you had to hand pump the pressure up before you could get them going and which were started with metho and ran on kero. Could be dam dangerous if it got away with you and you never went anywhere without a primus pricker. remember them. Tilly lamps were an upmarket gadget which superseded kero lanterns. The Tilley lamps were the fore runner of LPG lights and worked on the same principal, a cross between a primus kero stove and an LPG stove. Aahh the memories.

Well I reckon the old blokes would have given their right arm for the things we have at our disposal today and I guess they would have been right up there with us having all the latest gear and mod cons.

My father used to build caravans with his elder brother back in the late fourties and early fifties I think although he never owned what you would call good caravan. Some of his younger brothers did but dad was too busy working and could not afford such luxuries anyway. But all this gear available today is cheap compared to what was available back in those days you mention.

As I said to a mate the other day, back in the sixties and seventies we would have given our right arm for a 4 inch angle grinder, a reciprocating saw was not even invented nor was a DIY metal drop saw or half the tools we use today. What was available was through the roof price wise.

Their only disadvantage back then was product availability and price versus income. They were battling either way. So they, and we, made do with what was available.

We are very spoilt today for choice and price. Are we grateful, I doubt it. We take most things for granted I think.

Good times were had indeed and I am a firm believer that it is the company we keep and the people we meet that create the good times. Certainly the good memories I think, and all you need is a drink a seat and someone to natter with.
Showing my age now by the looks. LOL

Cheers, Bruce.

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restless and lost on a track that I know. HL.

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Follow Up By: Member - Bruce C (NSW) - Saturday, Mar 08, 2014 at 20:44

Saturday, Mar 08, 2014 at 20:44
Meant to say "a cross between a primus kero stove and an LPG light".
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Follow Up By: Axle - Saturday, Mar 08, 2014 at 21:01

Saturday, Mar 08, 2014 at 21:01
G/Day Bruce,..Know all about tilley lights.lol,...had to use them till I was eighteen yrs old,...the old fella had a bush block that was just to far from main power lines, to get connected at a reasonable price, so he told us!..lol....Anyway that was us ,as you mention a lot is taken for granted these days ,all the imports and so on ,plus the worst thing that's happened in this country! mismanaged credit cards.


Cheers Axle.
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Follow Up By: Steve M1 (NSW) - Saturday, Mar 08, 2014 at 21:34

Saturday, Mar 08, 2014 at 21:34
hey Bruce, always said that Oztent is nothing new - ok, maybe it goes up a bit quicker

$120,000 palaces on wheels, washing machines, running hot water and TV, aircon....bloody hell, my folks didn't even have that at home when they were wed...

;)
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Follow Up By: Member - Bruce C (NSW) - Sunday, Mar 09, 2014 at 09:40

Sunday, Mar 09, 2014 at 09:40
Steve,
My mum and dad started their married life together in the thirties in a rented house with a builders plank resting on the window sill and the other end resting on a banana case for a table and a couple of old chairs and a fruit case for seating, oh and the one luxury, a bed. LOL

Mum used to always proudly tell us that as she had set it up.

People were made of sterner stuff back then weren't they. What we would call today "survivors".

Yep, Ive got one of those traveling palaces minus the washing machine, I'd have that as well if the boss wanted it but she declined, lucky me.

It has highlighted one thing to me, that is that we can live very comfortably with 12 volt power, we don't really need 240 volt power.

Cheers, Bruce
At home and at ease on a track that I know not and
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Follow Up By: Steve M1 (NSW) - Sunday, Mar 09, 2014 at 09:50

Sunday, Mar 09, 2014 at 09:50
you've given me food for thought there, Bruce (last para) .....I'd love to stick it to those $$$$$hungry power companies. Maybe when I retire and build me shack somewhere, out where they can't get me.

Then I can go for a luxury holiday in a palace on wheels.

;)

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Follow Up By: Bob Y. - Qld - Sunday, Mar 09, 2014 at 12:24

Sunday, Mar 09, 2014 at 12:24
Bruce,

Your comments, and those of Val's, reminded me that my parents, when I was about 2 years old, moved to St Marys area for work, and were living in an air raid shelter, in the St Marys munitions area. By this time, around 1948, the factories were being opened up for private companies.

Think they lived there for about 12 months or so, before shifting up to lower Blue Mountains. Imagine they had power and water in the shelter. Remember Dad got in the bath one time, and didn't have any soap. Called out to me to get some, I'm all over the place like a blue arsed fly, raced in, threw the soap at Dad and took off again. When he went to use the soap, it was a cake of Solvol!

Bob.

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Can't remember most of it.

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Reply By: The Bantam - Saturday, Mar 08, 2014 at 22:55

Saturday, Mar 08, 2014 at 22:55
I think there is good and bad in the modern camping equipment.

Some of the inovations like LED lighting and gas cartridge stoves are realy practical.

But so many people want to take too much of home camping with them...the result is an overloaded vehicle and an empty wallet.

My brother who is 10 years older than me....untill recently used to camp for up to 6 weeks at a time on the job site and for several years lived wth his wife in a 10 x 10 canvas tent with their only refrigeration being a 30 litre engel......believe me he likes to be comfortable and does not lack for much.

while his current home has an electric stove...if he is cooking to impress or for his own satisfaction.....he lights a fire and breaks out the camp ovens.

Then we hear of people wanting to carry a 50 litre fridge and a 40 litre freezer for two people.

"Camper" trailers weiging near 2 tonnes with airconditioning or diesel heaters FGS.
Rolling b@#%y canvas McMansions.

Serioulsy..this whole "camping" thing has got out of hand....its suposed to be all about simplicity, low cost and traveing light.

cheers
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Follow Up By: Member - Bruce C (NSW) - Sunday, Mar 09, 2014 at 09:23

Sunday, Mar 09, 2014 at 09:23
Hi Bantam,
The more people spend the better the economy so having all the gear merely means more people have been employed making the article and more people have been employed selling the article.

This helps anyone who is working as it creates more jobs, albeit a lot of jobs in China as well.

We pay for what we want in many ways. First there is the purchase price then the price to haul it all around the country. But that is a persons own choice and if they feel happy doing it, then good on them, and more power to the employed as that spins even more dollars around.

Look at the economy of this country today and then look at it back about 50 years ago. Not even in the same ball park back then. It was a fledgling economy.

The best approach is to keep coming out with the next "must have item" so people will keep spending and that will keep jobs happening.

I am retired now but don't think for a minute I do not feel for any of those people who work for Ford or Holden or whoever.
When someone employs a person they take on that persons life and hopes and ambitions. Put them out of work and all those things are down the gurgler or at least put on hold.

No mate, keep spending on the next latest gadget and keep the dollars spinning, that is the way forward in this consumer economy.

If you want the biggest and latest or you want to be a minimalist, that is the individuals choice and more power to them.

That's the best thing about this country, choice. Some people aren't so lucky, lets count our blessings while we can.

We had to have the power put on here when we first arrived on this farm 30 years ago. It cost a heap of dough then and took months to get happening. In the meantime we had a better quality of life without power for those three months, I thought, than after the power was connected. So I know where you are coming from, but running water on tap is such a pleasure isn't it and back then all we had for hot water was a chip heater, bloody brilliant they were.

But I do love my gadgets. LOL

Cheers and happy travels,
Bruce.


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Follow Up By: The Bantam - Sunday, Mar 09, 2014 at 10:13

Sunday, Mar 09, 2014 at 10:13
It is exactly the insustainable consumer economy, that camping lets us escape.

When recession and even worse...economic colapse occurs....those of us that can be comfrotable with very little and are not hocked up to our eyeballs will be those who survive in comfort and come out the other side in good shape.


Remember while we have an economic structure that relies on growth and excessive consumption..there will always be recessions and economic instability.

cheers
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Follow Up By: Member - Bruce C (NSW) - Sunday, Mar 09, 2014 at 10:46

Sunday, Mar 09, 2014 at 10:46
My dad used to continually warn us that there was another depression coming and it was just around the corner.

He never threw anything out because he had been through 2 world wars and a depression in between. I called it the "depression mentality".
My brother called it "a depressing mentality".

People will adjust to whatever happens, that is the nature of people. The tough will survive and the others will follow their lead and slowly the economy will recover, if it gets that bad. If we were going to have another depression the GFC would have been it but cool heads prevailed, some even got wealthier from it, I didn't.

It may happen but we need to keep an eye on that while we work our way forward.

Australia has survived many downturns by continuing to spend our way through it, this keeps people in work and lessens the impact immensely. We are wise to keep that in mind.

Cheers, Bruce.

At home and at ease on a track that I know not and
restless and lost on a track that I know. HL.

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Reply By: Member - John and Val - Sunday, Mar 09, 2014 at 08:26

Sunday, Mar 09, 2014 at 08:26
Hi Axle,
Good post, but it wouldn't just be the old blokes who would roll over, the old girls would too. My parents spent their early years living under canvas during the depression, and raising kids too. No refrigeration, and not many creature comforts either. My eldest sister (quite a bit older than me) lived in railway tents for a few years in the 50s, and had a young family at the time. Those tents had wooden floors that must have made things a bit more bearable.

When John and I were much younger we bought a block of land at the coast and over the years built a little holiday cottage there. We camped on site over many weekends and holidays while the cottage slowly took shape. One time we were camping there for a few weeks with a student friend to help us out. We had a couple of canvas tents, no floors of course. Our kids then were aged 18 months and about 6weeks old. It started to rain which went on for endless days. Eventually we had the walls sheeted, windows in and a strip of flooring about a metre wide laid down. It was time to move in to get out of the rain, and that was what we did, with beds sitting on the floor joists!

Much of the fun of camping is IMHO about being innovative, finding ways to be comfortable with a minimal amount of stuff. Much of what passes for camping now is hardly camping at all - hence the glamping tag.

Cheers,

Val.
J and V
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Reply By: Bob W5 - Sunday, Mar 09, 2014 at 09:01

Sunday, Mar 09, 2014 at 09:01
Hi Axle, In 1978 as a 15 yo going for 3 day camps to Mt Korong, vic.
I had a new wizz bang 2 man tent with a fly from kmart, $30-, 2 kero lamps, sleeping bag, pillow, blanket, an esky with ice blocks made from 1 litre milk cartons,(reusable) a saucepan, frying pan and a 2 person picnic set put together by raiding the kitchen, Lol, The ferret and nets, and between my mate and I with some shrewd management, we had a couple of bottles of beer each for the weekend. Those were the days, no seats, no table, no mattress, no radio, just a fire to cook on and a million star view and the company of a good mate ! Back then as a first year apprentice that little tent cost me almost 4 days pay ! And I could hardly wait until I'd saved enough money to buy a Tilly lamp and a gas bottle ! Gee they're good memories !
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Reply By: Bob Y. - Qld - Sunday, Mar 09, 2014 at 12:12

Sunday, Mar 09, 2014 at 12:12
Axle,

You always find some good topics mate.

My Dad, born in 1911, had a pretty hard childhood so as an escape, took up bushwalking about time the Depression started. Had a 2 man japarra tent and "A" frame rucksack, made by Paddy Pallin, plus a bit of aluminium cooking gear and feather down sleeping bag.

One of his favourite haunts was North Era beach, adjacent to Royal National Park. He'd catch a train from Central Station to Waterfall on Friday arvo, and walk the 10-12 kms down to the beach, and camp back against the scrub, where there was good water. People used to run cattle down there then, and it was almost like a maintained park.

Come Sunday arvo, he'd head off and catch a late train into Sydeny. Return train fare cost him 1 shilling & sixpence(15c), and with a few snags, bit of rice and bread, the weekend would cost him 5/-(50c).

Years later, we were still using that tent, in our travels in an '56 Morris Minor.

Bob.

Seen it all, Done it all.
Can't remember most of it.

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Reply By: Pushy - Sunday, Mar 09, 2014 at 12:12

Sunday, Mar 09, 2014 at 12:12
A piece of canvas over the fence - luxury
We had it tough - had to sleep in a fresh cow paddy to keep warm.

Try telling that to the young ones and they won't believe you.
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Follow Up By: Member - Bruce C (NSW) - Sunday, Mar 09, 2014 at 13:26

Sunday, Mar 09, 2014 at 13:26
We don't believe you either Pushy. LOL
Or those cow pats must have been huge. LOL

Mind you there is nothing like putting freezing feet into a warm cow pat on a frosty morning, especially when it oozes up between the toes LOL. Aahh, heaven.

Mind you I have had to push a cow to make her get up so I would have somewhere warm to sit down, hahahahaha. True.

And there is nothing like it when milking a cow on a frosty morning and you put your cold face against their warm sides. Very cosy. LOL

I often wondered what the old girl thought when I grabbed her warm tits (I am talking cows here) with my cold hands. Luckily she was too busy racing through the feed I put in the bails for her to stop and complain. I think the old girl had a sense of humour anyway.

In that same vein I remember coming back from town one Xmas eve and the old milker came running down to get me and was bellowing at me. I could not make out what she was on about at first them I saw that she had calved so I followed after her. She took me to her calf which was still born and more or less bellowed to me to do something for it. It was too late unfortunately and she looked heart broken, but it bespoke of an intelligence I had not even considered. I like cows. especially Guernseys.

I always say, if your head is out of order, go work with animals. It can be very rewarding just to look at them do their thing.

Cheers, Bruce.
At home and at ease on a track that I know not and
restless and lost on a track that I know. HL.

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