Rear 50 amp anderson plug for camper trailers

Hi all,
For anyone that has a anderson plug to plug your camper trailer in, how is that wired? I have bought a new car and went to speak with autosparky and they said that i will need to get a redarce tc. I was under the impression that it just run straight for the battery fused etc. not with any type of isolater?

Confused as to what to do. As getting done next saturday

Cheers
Brenden
Back Expand Un-Read 0 Moderator

Reply By: Rangiephil - Saturday, Mar 15, 2014 at 16:47

Saturday, Mar 15, 2014 at 16:47
You would usually isolate any second battery from the starting battery , as this ensures that the starting battery is charged enough to start the car when needed.

It is normal practice to have either an isolator in the car or a 12v/12v charger in the trailer if you do not want to run very heavy cables over the long distance.
Regards Philip A
AnswerID: 528405

Follow Up By: Rangiephil - Saturday, Mar 15, 2014 at 17:30

Saturday, Mar 15, 2014 at 17:30
I am assuming you need quite a bit of power for a fridge or similar.

I only need power for LED lights and maybe a TV so I just use the live feed in the 7 pin plug which is from the wire in the car's wiring.

When parked I have a Merit/Hella 20 amp plug on the rear bumper linked to a 4 gauge cable to the rear bumper from my second isolated battery which is connected to a cable with another 7 pin plug on it, which attaches to the trailer male plug.

If you need an Anderson plug then you must need lots of power therefore you need to isolate.
Regards Philip A
1
FollowupID: 810930

Follow Up By: The Bantam - Saturday, Mar 15, 2014 at 23:14

Saturday, Mar 15, 2014 at 23:14
You realy are limiting the amountnof current available using the trailer plug...the pins are generally only rated for 15 amps.

AND...there is quite a bit of discussion about there beeing no reliable standard for power supply using the standard trailer plug.

its a pretty poor idea realy.

Jusr because you have an anderson plug...it does not necessarily follow that you need lots of power.

cheers

cheers
1
FollowupID: 810958

Follow Up By: Rangiephil - Sunday, Mar 16, 2014 at 15:31

Sunday, Mar 16, 2014 at 15:31
Yes, I have had it set up for eight years now and it has always worked perfectly,unless of course I have tripped over the cable.

So I guess we don't know yet whether it is a good idea.

Seeing 15 amps is 180watts and the absolute most I ever use is 40W (TV) 10W ( masthead amp), and 1 x10W LED = 60W, then I think 15 amps is plenty.
If I ever had a problem I can always plug appliances directly into the Merit plug on the back of the car rated at 20amps.

Or of course I can use my 50Amp Anderson Plug in the rear load area which is usually reserved for my 50AMP 150 l per min compressor, or my 300W inverter.
The point I am making is horses for courses and really a 50 amp Anderson plug can be overkill , and useless if the wiring to feed it is insufficient.
Regards Philip A
0
FollowupID: 811017

Reply By: Member - John and Val - Saturday, Mar 15, 2014 at 16:51

Saturday, Mar 15, 2014 at 16:51
Hi Brenden,

Depends what you want to do with it.

If you simply want to draw current from the vehicle battery and use the anderson connector as a sort of power point to plug in lights or maybe a fridge then you are right - instal a fuse close to the battery, then run a decent sized cable from the fuse to the anderson connector. Ideally, use twin cable and connect the positive to the fuse, and negative to the ground (chassis) connection used by the vehicle battery.

If though you want to connect a caravan/camper trailer that has its own battery or a three way fridge, then you should have some sort of switching to connect the vehicle's electrics to the trailer only when the engine is running to provide charging current. I think that's probably what your sparky is recommending.

Why do you want the anderson plug? What's its function? We can be a lot more helpful if we know what you are trying to achieve.

Cheers

John
J and V
"Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted."
- Albert Einstein

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

AnswerID: 528406

Follow Up By: Member - Brenden H - Sunday, Mar 16, 2014 at 14:03

Sunday, Mar 16, 2014 at 14:03
Hi John,
Thanks, I have a new car that we will be travelling in with our new camper trailer. Our camper trailer has a 100 amp battery in it to power the LED lighting as well as the Engel fridge and a few 12v outlets, All I want to do is while the camper trailer is connected to the car that it tops up the battery in the camper trailer. The vehicle will not be fitted with dual batteries, will be standard one only.

***The auto sparky mentioned if the alternator is variant current????
that we can get away with it.

Why the Anderson plug? I have no idea, just want a separate plug that can be on the car and trailer other than the 7 pin plug. I have just seen mostly that Anderson plug set up on allot of caravans and camper trailers so though it would be kinda universal as well.

Cheers
Brenden
0
FollowupID: 811006

Follow Up By: Member - John and Val - Sunday, Mar 16, 2014 at 16:55

Sunday, Mar 16, 2014 at 16:55
Hi Brenden,

My apologies - I missed your reference to a camper trailer - dunno how, it's pretty obvious, but that was what was behind my queries about why you need an anderson plug.

For your purposes I'd definitely go with the anderson plug and some good solid cabling from the engine bay to the back of the vehicle. In some cases you can get away with using the 7 pin connector or, its 14 way big brother, but the anderson plug is a much better way to go.

The alternator is an interesting (and not straightforward) question. Many recent vehicles use computer control of the alternator voltage, where in older vehicles the voltage was set by the alternator characteristics and battery's requirements.

You need about 14.4 volts delivered to your trailer battery to charge it fully. Few alternators, especially the computer controlled ones, will provide this, especially if there are significant losses in your cabling. (That's why heavy cables are recommended.) Suggest discuss this with your sparkey. Mention of dc-dc chargers often starts a fight on this forum, but they can be a good way of increasing the charging voltage available to the trailer battery. That's what Evaready suggests below when referring to the BCDC 12/40 LV. (If you do go that way, suggest you insist on the LV version.)

HTH

John





J and V
"Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted."
- Albert Einstein

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

1
FollowupID: 811022

Follow Up By: Member - John and Val - Sunday, Mar 16, 2014 at 17:45

Sunday, Mar 16, 2014 at 17:45
Brenden - meant to mention that the suggested dc-dc charger is a 40 amp one - good gear but a bit much for a single battery system. There is a 25 amp equivalent which would be more suitable - see Evaready's link. These are a quick way of spending money, but do have good solar capability built in. I use a good 30A one from ABR Sidewinder (a respected ExplorOz member) here. ( I can't comment on his latest version that apparently handles solar, but appears to lack the low voltage capability.)

Cheers

John
J and V
"Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted."
- Albert Einstein

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

1
FollowupID: 811028

Reply By: ABR - SIDEWINDER - Saturday, Mar 15, 2014 at 18:49

Saturday, Mar 15, 2014 at 18:49
Hi Brendan

Have a look at this page: camper-charge-cable

It is quite simile and yes you need an isolator.

Regards

Derek from ABR
AnswerID: 528411

Reply By: John and Regina M - Saturday, Mar 15, 2014 at 22:46

Saturday, Mar 15, 2014 at 22:46
Why would you b confused? You sought advice from a professional and received it.
AnswerID: 528423

Follow Up By: Member - Brenden H - Sunday, Mar 16, 2014 at 14:05

Sunday, Mar 16, 2014 at 14:05
I am confused to what the alternator has and to what I need, just wanted to check with people that have more of an idea than myself.
0
FollowupID: 811008

Reply By: AlbyNSW - Sunday, Mar 16, 2014 at 08:40

Sunday, Mar 16, 2014 at 08:40
Not knowing your circumstances but I suspect what your electrician is suggesting is to include a Redarc isolator into the system to protect your cranking battery from running flat from whatever you have in your trailer.
It is not mandatory as you will have power at the Anderson plug with or without one but is a good way if doing it to prevent being stranded from a flat battery
AnswerID: 528442

Reply By: Member - evaredy - Sunday, Mar 16, 2014 at 14:21

Sunday, Mar 16, 2014 at 14:21
Your sparky is telling you your vehicle has a variable voltage Alternator a lot of newer cars have these.

He is telling you you will need a charger that is compatible with your alternator. When I had mine fitted, Redarc were the only ones that made one.

I have a Redarc BCDC 1240-LV installed, this powers the battery from the alternator and also allows for solar charging.
The 40 means it is 40Amps and the LV mean Low Voltage.
AnswerID: 528481

Follow Up By: Member - evaredy - Sunday, Mar 16, 2014 at 14:22

Sunday, Mar 16, 2014 at 14:22
Forgot the link
Redarc
0
FollowupID: 811011

Reply By: Member - Brenden H - Sunday, Mar 16, 2014 at 20:26

Sunday, Mar 16, 2014 at 20:26
Thanks all

will be going the Redarc with the install.

cheers all, learnt something with that
AnswerID: 528507

Sponsored Links

Popular Products (13)