Transport of a two stroke outboard horizintally?

Submitted: Wednesday, Feb 25, 2004 at 21:24
ThreadID: 10792 Views:13282 Replies:7 FollowUps:6
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I have just purchased a used 3.8 mtr Savage Jabiru and Mariner two stroke (approx 98 - 2000 model) 15HP outboard. Can I transport this outboard horizontally on the roof rack / in trailer box or do I have to transport it on the vertical. I am prepared to drain oil and perform some preperation to make roofrack transport possible as vertical could become a pain in the ar*e.

If I need to transport it in the vertical any suggestions for the bracketing? I have a Kaymar dual wheel carrier and Jumbuck camper trailer with boat rack.

As usual thanks. Please please tell me can transport this on the horizontal. I am running out of cash!!!!!!!!

Peter
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Reply By: friar - Wednesday, Feb 25, 2004 at 21:49

Wednesday, Feb 25, 2004 at 21:49
Hi Peter
I have a 15hp mercury 2stroke,it has been to cape york & the territory several
times,with the engine in a milk crate cut out,with the prop facing the
tray,never a problem,the crate keeps it from rolling around,hope this
is of some assistance
Friar
AnswerID: 48097

Follow Up By: Member - Peter- Wednesday, Feb 25, 2004 at 21:55

Wednesday, Feb 25, 2004 at 21:55
Many thanks Friar.

I gather from your message there is no need to drop oils or any other preperation required?

PS> Gotta love those milk crates, they come in handy for everything, I am already using them for a home made set of storage _Affordable_Storage_Drawers.aspx in a fridge / ice box / carry box I made for the back of the 100 series. You can cut the sides out and use them as stacker _Affordable_Storage_Drawers.aspx when camping as well!!

Thanks again

Peter

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FollowupID: 310032

Follow Up By: Member - Peter- Thursday, Feb 26, 2004 at 07:33

Thursday, Feb 26, 2004 at 07:33
Any suggestions on a set of wheels to hook on the back for towing it to the river beach from camp spot.

I intend on using nothing too flash; two alloy struts at rear with wheelbarrow wheels clamped on with G-clamps, some kind of plate to bolt onto the tow bar and maybe a long ratchet strap running front to rear to hold it all together down low. I also think the strap running under the hull will also give some added support.

Any suggestions would be great. No folding trailers please.

Peter
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FollowupID: 310063

Reply By: friar - Wednesday, Feb 25, 2004 at 22:18

Wednesday, Feb 25, 2004 at 22:18
No kneed to drain the oil.if you are new to owning a outboard motor
the only servicing i give mine is a new plug &change the oil in
the gear box 1 time every year& grease it about every 2nd trip out
,pushes the water out of the leg,a little squirt of lubrication around
motor &electrics every time it is not being used ,seems to help
stop corrison, enjoy your fishing
Friar
AnswerID: 48106

Follow Up By: Member - Peter- Wednesday, Feb 25, 2004 at 22:22

Wednesday, Feb 25, 2004 at 22:22
Cheers Friar
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FollowupID: 310034

Reply By: basecamp15 - Wednesday, Feb 25, 2004 at 23:19

Wednesday, Feb 25, 2004 at 23:19
Yep it's all good. I do that and have no problems.
Cheers, Mark.
AnswerID: 48121

Reply By: Member - Hugh (WA) - Thursday, Feb 26, 2004 at 00:25

Thursday, Feb 26, 2004 at 00:25
Hi Peter,

The beautiful thing about a 2S outboard engine is that they do not have a sump, hence no oil to drain. In this engine size the fuel is typically pre-mixed with 2S lubricant. Being 2S they are also light, therefore not so hard on the body when liftingonto your roofrack.

You will have no problems in transporting the engine on its side.

Regards,
Hugh
AnswerID: 48133

Follow Up By: V8troopie - Thursday, Feb 26, 2004 at 01:32

Thursday, Feb 26, 2004 at 01:32
Agree with the comments about transporting on its side. It may be easier on the tiller handle or gear lever or prop to transport it horizontally, front facing down. Many motors rest then on the plate above the prop and the carrying handle, it will fit easier into a cut out milkcrate too.
When lifting it up to the roof rack it is not a good idea to raise the motor leg above the motor head, water still in the passages above the water pump may find its way into the cylinder via the exhaust port.
Klaus
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FollowupID: 310057

Follow Up By: Member - Peter- Thursday, Feb 26, 2004 at 07:32

Thursday, Feb 26, 2004 at 07:32
Any suggestions on a set of wheels to hook on the back for towing it to the river beach from camp spot.

I intend on using nothing too flash; two alloy struts at rear with wheelbarrow wheels clamped on with G-clamps, some kind of plate to bolt onto the tow bar and maybe a long ratchet strap running front to rear to hold it all together down low. I also think the strap running under the hull will also give some added support.

Any suggestions would be great. No folding trailers please.

Peter

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FollowupID: 310062

Reply By: Member- Rox - Thursday, Feb 26, 2004 at 01:22

Thursday, Feb 26, 2004 at 01:22
Just keep the prop lower than the motor to stop the water going into the head, I was told!!!!1991 80Series Std Diesel
2003 Down Under Camper
AnswerID: 48145

Follow Up By: Shaker - Thursday, Feb 26, 2004 at 19:18

Thursday, Feb 26, 2004 at 19:18
Go to the top of the class! That is the most important thing to remember, also never lay it on the gear lever, better to put tiller arm side down.
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FollowupID: 310136

Reply By: DARREN - Thursday, Feb 26, 2004 at 12:56

Thursday, Feb 26, 2004 at 12:56
Not sure about such weight on a roof rack but, I took my 25 yamaha in a box trailer with boat on top to cape york last year, just laid it in it's side on a thick piece of foam and held down really tight with ratchet straps, with some fabric to avoid the ratchets touching the actual motor.. I was wary of the paint being trashed by rubbing and ended up gaffa taping the cowl to protect it. As it turned out no real need to gaffa tape and the whole thing worked really well. Outboards are pretty tough and the gearbox is sealed so no problems putting it on it's side.

As mentioned above be sure to wait until the leg is very very well drained before lifting the prop above the (motor) head, or preferrably keep the prop lower all the time unless you are sure it is dry in there.

Also if using is salt water where you may not be able to wash & flush it straight, take a can of lanox (inox brand) which is a great corrosion inhibitor to spray all over and under cowl and can also be used on your fishing reels.
AnswerID: 48204

Reply By: Bros - Thursday, Feb 26, 2004 at 17:17

Thursday, Feb 26, 2004 at 17:17
Peter,
I have taken my previous outboard (15 hp Yamaha) to Bathurst Bay and many points between there and Cooktown several times horizontally. I made a box up out of structural ply with a lid. The motor lays in the box prop down with the prop sitting on a piece of conveyor belt rubber(not the metal reinforced one). On the back of the motor just below where the cowl fits on there is a raised section right across. The top of the motor sits on this and i chiseled out a section of pine(3x11/2)to fit this raised edge and screwed this to the bottom of the box in the right place. When the motor is placed in the box the raised section sits in the groove and stops movement of the top section of the motor as well as lifting the motor end a little higher still. In the space under the motor(between prop and top of the motor) i place my two sand anchors, ropes and chain in a bag. Around the motor go safety vests, tackle box, bags and any other item that will fit until the box is full. I now have a 15 hp Evinrude that has been to the Cape and Bathurst Bay and it fits in the same place as the Yammy did. No problems at all with both motors being transported this way. You do not need to put all the gear in the box like i did, there fore making the box smaller.
Hope this is of some help.
Cheers, Bros.
AnswerID: 48227

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