Snorkel

Submitted: Saturday, Jun 14, 2014 at 15:26
ThreadID: 108245 Views:2750 Replies:6 FollowUps:7
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I want to fit a snorkel to my petrol Prado 120, there are many on the market and vary hugely in price. When all is said and done they are only plastic, does price matter, any recommenadtion.

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Reply By: Idler Chris - Saturday, Jun 14, 2014 at 16:14

Saturday, Jun 14, 2014 at 16:14
If you are not going in water it probably does not matter. If you do go in water you want it to be 100% water tight. A one piece is better than a two piece and a good tight fit and properly installed is a must. Many a vehicle has been written off because water got in due to a poor fit and/or bad installation. Every year I take the top of my snorkel and cover it with a padded board. If the engine does not die then there is probably a leak somewhere. I call it insurance.
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Follow Up By: Member - Terry W4 - Saturday, Jun 14, 2014 at 17:27

Saturday, Jun 14, 2014 at 17:27
Like the idea of testing integrity of the snorkel. Will add to my list of pre-trip checks.
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Follow Up By: Idler Chris - Saturday, Jun 14, 2014 at 17:43

Saturday, Jun 14, 2014 at 17:43
Was at Nolans Brook on the Cape in 2003 and this guy was beside himself after is engine blew up because it had water in it. Someone had pointed out to him that the connection around the guard had vibrated loose. He had incorrectly assumed that after having it fitted by a 4WD shop it should be right. WRONG
I have always checked every year since.
Another tip if you suspect a trip may involve deep water. In conjunction with my 4WD shop I have ascertained that I can go into water up to 25mm below the side mirrors. When I get to a deep crossing I stand next to my mirror, mark my shirt, walk the crossing, and if the mark is dry - go, mark wet no go. That way the decision is made in Melbourne and not in the heat of the moment with others egging you on.
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Reply By: Bludge - Saturday, Jun 14, 2014 at 18:04

Saturday, Jun 14, 2014 at 18:04
If you drive dirt or dusty roads.

My view on a snorkel is ensuring that you get cleaner cooler air up high, than from the wheel arch or engine bay. Clean air, less dust in the air filter, better performance and less maintenance

The added safety for water crossing is a bonus.

While many people say that a snorkel will prevent water entering the engine, it will, but even with a snorkel its more likely that water will enter the engine from the air filter box drain, if not checked and kept clear.

This drain should not be sealed, driving in heavy rain may allow water into the snorkel then into the air filter box, no drain and any dust becomes mud or possibly will get into the engine, it takes only a thimble of water to kill an engine, especially a diesel. So the drain is important.

Buy a Safari or Airtec, they are UV stabilised and have a good reputation.

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Follow Up By: Hoyks - Saturday, Jun 14, 2014 at 19:44

Saturday, Jun 14, 2014 at 19:44
The sealing the drain can be argued.
Safari design their snorkel heads to channel the water drops to the back of the snorkel head where they can drain away without going down the actual snorkel.


http://www.offroadaussie.com/2013/02/how-does-a-4wd-snorkel-work/

While the engine is running and drawing in air, if you do get water in the air box it isn't going to drain out. It will sit there, possibly with air bubbling through it, until the engine is shut down at which point it might drain.

The other reason to seal the air box is that the one way valves can fall out, I know the one in my wagon did, or be less than a good seal anyway.

My BT50 has a 'valve' in the bottom of the airbox but Mazda/Ford, in their infinite wisdom, decided to discontinue the thin rubber disc that might have had some hope of keeping the water out and left the hole open. I know it didn't fall out due to age as I found it missing with 1500km on the clock. It isn't even listed as a spare part.

Safari and a tube of Polyurethane sealant for me.
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Follow Up By: Member - Russler - Saturday, Jun 14, 2014 at 20:56

Saturday, Jun 14, 2014 at 20:56
I also have a Safari snorkel fitted to my 4.2TD Patrol. I was surprised how much grot builds up in the drain slots, so it has become something I check on a regular basis.
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Follow Up By: Bludge - Saturday, Jun 14, 2014 at 22:17

Saturday, Jun 14, 2014 at 22:17
Hooks,

Agree with the Safari snorkel, I have one, but original poster mentioned 'other' snorkels that may not work as well.

The drain is I agree is debatable, but keep clean will collect water and allow to drain on idle, the Toyota 100 box is designed to collect water in the drain recess, can't comment on all vehicles.
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Follow Up By: Bludge - Saturday, Jun 14, 2014 at 22:22

Saturday, Jun 14, 2014 at 22:22
Sorry, Hoyks , spell check on my tablet...
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Follow Up By: Bob Y. - Qld - Sunday, Jun 15, 2014 at 09:50

Sunday, Jun 15, 2014 at 09:50
Rob,

As Bludge said, Safari or Airtec. If you were planning on doing a lot of scrub bashing, the Airtec might be the better choice, because it follows the contour of the cab closely. The Safari could be damaged by any low, overhanging branches.

I fitted a Safari snorkel to an 80 series we had, after seeing the amount of water that got close to the air intake, at low speeds, in water maybe 600mm deep.

Two things to remember if you fit one yourself.............cutting that humungous hole in your pride and joy, and having the dexterity to be able to screw the nuts, onto the mounting studs, in the mudguard. Had to break my wrist in 3 places to get everything tightened up :-)

Had no improvement in economy, and it wasn't noisy.

Bob

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Reply By: Member - Russler - Saturday, Jun 14, 2014 at 20:53

Saturday, Jun 14, 2014 at 20:53
I asked some questions quite a while ago about how to test the integrity of the seals of the snorkel. It was suggested that rather than seal the inlet of the snorkel to try and smother the engine (which was suggested may actually damage otherwise good seals in the process), that try a product called 'start ya bastard' or similar, and with the engine running, spray it inside the guard etc. If there is a leak, the engine will rev faster for a time because it is drawing in the spray from somewhere it ought not. I should add that I have not tried this myself yet, but it sounds like a good idea.
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Reply By: desray (WA - Sunday, Jun 15, 2014 at 05:46

Sunday, Jun 15, 2014 at 05:46
Safari ,,, some of the cheaper ones have a smaller diam and will starve the 4.0 litre engine of air.
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Reply By: passionfruit - Sunday, Jun 15, 2014 at 11:47

Sunday, Jun 15, 2014 at 11:47
Not much of an advantage for a petrol engine as you have except for the fact less dust will be sucked in to the engine.
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Reply By: Rob M12 - Sunday, Jun 15, 2014 at 12:10

Sunday, Jun 15, 2014 at 12:10
Thanks everyone for the feedback, very helpfull
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