Exhaust Jack and LC200 Exhaust Outlet

Submitted: Sunday, Jun 15, 2014 at 16:56
ThreadID: 108264 Views:2946 Replies:6 FollowUps:4
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We have an Ironman exhaust jack, tried to use once and failed (Tyre Shredded), had to wave fellow traveller down who had Hi Lift Jack and got me on road again in 15 mins.

The problem we had was this.. the exhaust outlet on the 200 "points down" and as such the outlet then goes from circle (say 80mm) if straight to oval (say 110mm)when points down. Which means the Exhaust Jack rubber is nigh on impossible to hold on by hand and who would carry a 120mm worm drive clip to hold it???

Any one else had this problem and how did you overcome? Did you have a coupling made?
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Reply By: AlbyNSW - Sunday, Jun 15, 2014 at 17:23

Sunday, Jun 15, 2014 at 17:23
Two things
1. Get a set of tyre pressure monitors and you will probably not have to deal with a shredded tyre again
2. Ditch the exhaust jack and carry a decent bottle jack, takes up less space and it works

I have seen two unsuccessful attempts of using an exhaust jack and not a fan, I can see a use for them if you are bogged in an awkward position and want to lift the vehicle to pack some solid material under a wheel but I don't like the idea of changing a wheel with them
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Follow Up By: wholehog - Sunday, Jun 15, 2014 at 20:11

Sunday, Jun 15, 2014 at 20:11
Well said.
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Follow Up By: olcoolone - Tuesday, Jun 17, 2014 at 08:05

Tuesday, Jun 17, 2014 at 08:05
Have to agree and about the exhaust jack; know a few people who bought them and like most useless stuff after a few trips the jacks ended up in their shed never to be seen again.

A bottle jack and a alloy jack plate is much better...... not forgetting a hi lift.
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Reply By: Ross M - Sunday, Jun 15, 2014 at 20:41

Sunday, Jun 15, 2014 at 20:41
Ian and Pen
You may see this as harsh, I see it as life or situation saving, but, it would be best to check the operation of any equipment before it is ever required. ie, make sure it works as intended.

If carried out prior, the issue would have been discovered and YES a hose clamp would then have been carried for such an event.
Sales info is great but they often fail to address the real issues.
Thinking into the functions and checking gear prior to a trip is essential if you intend to not have to rely on someone else.
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Reply By: Ron N - Sunday, Jun 15, 2014 at 20:47

Sunday, Jun 15, 2014 at 20:47
"Get a set of tyre pressure monitors and you will probably not have to deal with a shredded tyre again" ...
That's a bit rude. Obviously, you've never clobbered a razor-edged gibber that has resulted in a shredded tyre by the time you came to a halt from 70 or 80kmh.
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Follow Up By: AlbyNSW - Sunday, Jun 15, 2014 at 21:10

Sunday, Jun 15, 2014 at 21:10
Yes Ron matter a fact I have copped a razor sharp gibber stone on the Birdsville track doing exactly that speed and it opened up a big flap in the centre of my tread but because I had a tyre pressure monitor I did not continue to drive on it unknowingly to damage the sidewalls. I did have to change it though as the hole was too big to be plugged but Phil at Mungeranie managed to put a patch on it so I could still carry it as a spare.
That was the only time that I have had to remove a tyre since I have had a TPMS system as all other punctures I have received I have been alerted early enough that I have been able to find and plug the leak whilst still on the vehicle and then top up the lost air.
The price of a tyre pressure monitored is less than the cost of one tyre so the price is easily justified

And in my quote I did say you will "probably not" as of course there are instances but you have reduced the chance substantially

And I wasn't trying to be rude and apologies to the OP if it was taken that way, I was just offering some practical advice based on my own experiences.
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Reply By: Member - Leigh (Vic) - Monday, Jun 16, 2014 at 10:42

Monday, Jun 16, 2014 at 10:42
Took a chap away with me in a group of four wheel drivers to the Vic High Country. His disco had a very low profile set of tyres and inevitably a rock took out the sidewall.

Out with his exhaust jack, jam it onto the exhaust and he was set!! Unfortunately what he didn't realise was he had a dual exhaust muffler and all that happened was the exhaust pressure just escaped out the other pipe. Fortunately the group was able to assist him by putting a foot across the other pipe to seal the system and put gas into his bag. Oh dear, what an oversight!
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Reply By: Krooznalong - Monday, Jun 16, 2014 at 13:24

Monday, Jun 16, 2014 at 13:24
Ian - have you posted this question on the LCOOL site - 200 series section ?
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Reply By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Tuesday, Jun 17, 2014 at 19:20

Tuesday, Jun 17, 2014 at 19:20
Some years ago I purchased an exhaust jack and soon realised it was pretty useless.
To make it useful, I made up an adaptor with a schrader valve so I could inflate it off my tyre pump. That bit works fine now - just have the usual problems of finding a place under the Landcruiser where the thing won't get punctured and where it won't trash the underside of the vehicle.
AnswerID: 534546

Follow Up By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Tuesday, Jun 17, 2014 at 19:22

Tuesday, Jun 17, 2014 at 19:22
And just to add, I'd rather take the hilift or trolley jack away rather than the bullbag.
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