Driving at night?

Submitted: Sunday, Jun 22, 2014 at 18:58
ThreadID: 108450 Views:2644 Replies:18 FollowUps:16
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Have never had a issue with it, actually have enjoyed it until of late, where in some

incidents my vision has changed, at times things all become the same so its hard to distinguish the road in front or more so whats on the road, especially if its raining.
Have had eyes checked and all is good for age,..Just thinking about glasses for night time driving,Anyone had the same problem and what was their solution?

Cheers Axle.
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Reply By: Member - Patto (SA) - Sunday, Jun 22, 2014 at 19:16

Sunday, Jun 22, 2014 at 19:16
Like you Axle I used to like driving at night but for the last year or so am finding it more difficult especially when the road is wet or it is drissling. At times I find the glare from modern car headlights are too bright even on low beam
Must be that getting old syndrome

Patto
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Follow Up By: Shaker - Sunday, Jun 22, 2014 at 22:42

Sunday, Jun 22, 2014 at 22:42
Most likely illegal HID lights giving you & everybody else problems!

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Follow Up By: Nomadic Navara - Monday, Jun 23, 2014 at 00:27

Monday, Jun 23, 2014 at 00:27
Probably the wanker lights that are causing the problem. Those fog lights can only legally be used in fog conditions. It's about time the coppers started blitzing them.
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Follow Up By: Bob Y. - Qld - Monday, Jun 23, 2014 at 08:30

Monday, Jun 23, 2014 at 08:30
With a $40 fine(in Qld) it won't happen any time soon, Peter. :-(




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Reply By: wholehog - Sunday, Jun 22, 2014 at 19:17

Sunday, Jun 22, 2014 at 19:17
Good thread. I used to love driving at night when younger..but these days..not so...and glasses does help.
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Reply By: Member - KBAD - Sunday, Jun 22, 2014 at 19:21

Sunday, Jun 22, 2014 at 19:21
HID spotlights will help the light is more white.
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Reply By: Member - Terry W4 - Sunday, Jun 22, 2014 at 19:21

Sunday, Jun 22, 2014 at 19:21
Was told about 20 years ago when I was prescribed glasses that night vision would be the first thing that suffered. Indeed it is true.
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Reply By: Ron N - Sunday, Jun 22, 2014 at 19:38

Sunday, Jun 22, 2014 at 19:38
Axle - There's a good, straightforward (American) article below - and it basically says there's not a lot you can do about it.
If you've had eye checks, that's the important bit.

Blinded by the Night

Macular degeneration is a problem you need to identify early, if you have it.

It's interesting to note that arterial health is linked to eyesight problems.
SWMBO takes Ocuvite 50 Plus. She says it works and she notices a definite improvement.
If you buy some, make sure it's got the right number on it. 50 Plus is for over 50's.
The "plus" is actually the "plus" symbol on the bottle, this forum won't accept the "plus" symbol.

Cheers, Ron.
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Follow Up By: Axle - Sunday, Jun 22, 2014 at 19:51

Sunday, Jun 22, 2014 at 19:51
Thanks Ron, Will have a look at those.



Axle.
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Reply By: grant t1 - Sunday, Jun 22, 2014 at 19:56

Sunday, Jun 22, 2014 at 19:56
If it helps, when I'm on my motorcycle travelling at night, I change over to yellow safety glasses,stops all the glare and dos'nt interfer with clear vision.
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Follow Up By: Nomadic Navara - Monday, Jun 23, 2014 at 00:42

Monday, Jun 23, 2014 at 00:42
I found that too. The Cancer Council sell yellow wrap around sunglass type glasses for night driving. They work wonders.
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Reply By: Idler Chris - Sunday, Jun 22, 2014 at 19:56

Sunday, Jun 22, 2014 at 19:56
Driving at night means that if any issues arise you have to deal with at night and at the end of the day when you are tired. Secondly if you are driving, then you have not had a happy hour, not something thats likely to happen to this little wood duck. Thirdly, if your eyes are failing you are probably retired, so what do you want to drive at night for anyway?
If you have k's that just must be covered then best to go to bed early and get on the road at sun up when you are much freasher IMHO.
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Reply By: Member - Beatit (QLD) - Sunday, Jun 22, 2014 at 20:09

Sunday, Jun 22, 2014 at 20:09
Thanks Axle for highlighting what seems to be a relatively common problem or so it seems! I have been aware that night driving has become less pleasurable for me for a couple of years but have just compensated by doing more daytime driving. Night driving had so much going for it and one of the main benefits was the lack of traffic.

Even though my optometrist says my eyesight is fine for driving I'm finding glasses help my nigh time driving.

Kind regards
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Follow Up By: Axle - Sunday, Jun 22, 2014 at 20:22

Sunday, Jun 22, 2014 at 20:22
Thanks Beatit, any particular glasses?

Axle.
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Follow Up By: Member - Beatit (QLD) - Sunday, Jun 22, 2014 at 20:35

Sunday, Jun 22, 2014 at 20:35
No, just prescription glasses that seem to sharpen the image when driving. Just little things that I suddenly realised were not so clear, such as street signs and directions that are just that little hard to see in the dark lit up by headlights.

Kind regards
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Reply By: Bob Y. - Qld - Sunday, Jun 22, 2014 at 20:32

Sunday, Jun 22, 2014 at 20:32
Axle,

Just another one of the things that suck with the advancing years, eh!

I retired again about 5 weeks ago, and prior to that was doing 25-30 hours/week at night, with the odd "all nighter" thrown in, to test all systems. Use to get terrible eye strain when the trucks only had a pair of Hella 4000's with halogen globes. Then they started fitting 40" LED light bars, with the halogens, and that was a vast improvement. Bit later, all the 4000's got HID inserts and life got pretty good.

The new trucks this year have a pair of Peak Explorers LEDs, plus the Hellas. Just don't get eyestrain anymore, don't get any stress from not being able to see clearly and have checked clear vision ahead, between Mt Isa & Camooweal, at in excess of a kilometre. Okay, at that distance one probably can't see what's on the road, but you're going to see it a lot earlier than if the vehicle was running normal high beam, or Halogen spotties. The LEDs give a good spread as well, probably over 20 metres each side, from edge of highway.

The worst low beam lights were 'vanners who obviously hadn't upgraded their rear suspension, and should have been camped up anyway, trying to digest that bottle of red. Plenty of drivers "forget" to dip, done it myself, but a quick flash gets everyone on a level playing field.

Driving in the rain, no fog line and trucks with headlights that have one side on low and other on high, can go on the list too. Now keen to try these yellow glasses........

Bob

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Follow Up By: Ron N - Sunday, Jun 22, 2014 at 20:48

Sunday, Jun 22, 2014 at 20:48
Bob, if there's one thing I hate with a vengeance, it's those bloody halogen projector headlights, when they are badly adjusted, or the vehicle is overloaded. They ought to be banned.

Cheers, Ron.
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Follow Up By: Bob Y. - Qld - Monday, Jun 23, 2014 at 08:50

Monday, Jun 23, 2014 at 08:50
Axle,

Forgot to mention, prescription glasses at night, and heavy overcast conditions, with eye drops for when air con dries the eyes.


Ron,

Yeah, and those bloody fog lights too.

Bob

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Follow Up By: Bob Y. - Qld - Monday, Jun 23, 2014 at 09:36

Monday, Jun 23, 2014 at 09:36
And keep the lights and windscreen clean too.

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Follow Up By: Slow one - Monday, Jun 23, 2014 at 19:08

Monday, Jun 23, 2014 at 19:08
Bob Y,

I know what you mean by bug guts on the windscreen, clean is good.

When I did big hours at night I always had a set of sunglasses on my head and would use them when I got hit by badly adjusted headlights, which was often. I always found my eyes were not sore in the morning as the sun came up.

Now I don't see as well at night and try not to drive if I don't have to.

Hey your old Toll mate doing the Landsborough/ Barkley highway run could afford to lose about 60 kg, I really felt sorry for him, when I saw him struggling to walk back to his rig.
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Follow Up By: Bob Y. - Qld - Tuesday, Jun 24, 2014 at 16:12

Tuesday, Jun 24, 2014 at 16:12
Ha ha, couple of big boys in the group alright, Slow.

Maybe their partners like the big, cuddly bear? Me, I like being nearly slim :-)

Bob

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Reply By: RoyHarvey - Sunday, Jun 22, 2014 at 22:54

Sunday, Jun 22, 2014 at 22:54
Hi Axle, I certainly notice that my vision is not as good as it used to be and driving at night seems to require extra caution / concentration particularly in the wet. For me glasses are a big help.

This is an interesting topic for me because apart from the general glare issues of night driving I have been paying some attention to individual vehicles.
In my observation over 90% of vehicles have 'inoffensive' headlights. That is well aimed and not excessively bright.

Amongst the other 10% however I believe there are many with offensively bright globes fitted. (They have noticeably more glare than the surrounding vehicles.)

Also lately I have been noticing a number of cars that appear to have the headlights aimed upward. (These are most apparent when they are following on a flat road and light up your roof lining, I'm not including high vehicles, and no it's not generally because they've got a heavy load in the boot.)
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Reply By: Gone Bush (WA) - Sunday, Jun 22, 2014 at 22:55

Sunday, Jun 22, 2014 at 22:55
Totally agree Axle.

But, wait until you start developing cataracts. You will get double vision, especially tail lights.

It's a crime to grow old.



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Follow Up By: Nomadic Navara - Monday, Jun 23, 2014 at 00:39

Monday, Jun 23, 2014 at 00:39
I have a pair of prescription long distance lenses that are tinted yellow. I first used a pair of light yellow wrap around sun glasses. They worked wonders. I can pass all the tests for driving without glasses but the yellow tinted prescription lenses for long distance work much better.

I even find them better than sunglasses on an overcast day.
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Reply By: Les PK Ranger - Sunday, Jun 22, 2014 at 23:14

Sunday, Jun 22, 2014 at 23:14
Agree the halogen upgrades can be a pita, either not properly shaded, adjusted poorly, or as mentioned vehicle overloaded and then they're too high.

I don't know why people want them anyway, my std Ranger low / high beam have a yellow filament light, and that is far better for most driving, esp in cloudy hills driving as it cuts through better.
Less reflection of signs too, which can be a real pain with HIDs.

The last thing I want to do is half blind the person driving towards me in two tonnes of metal that is doing 100km/hr !!
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Reply By: Ron N - Monday, Jun 23, 2014 at 09:52

Monday, Jun 23, 2014 at 09:52
The lights angle suddenly reminded me of the brothers stunt many many years ago, that always makes me chuckle.

He had a late model HJ61 and fitted it out nicely, with the compulsory twin 150 watt Cibies, as well as the already excellent 4 headlights of the Tojo.

He was a bugger for being quick to "punish" oncoming motorists with badly adjusted headlights, or too slow to dip their lights, with a good blast of the Cibies and headlights on high beam.

In fact, I think he relished it. Then one night, he had a bloke come towards him with bright low beam lights that annoyed him - so he flicked the Cibies and high beam on, to teach this bloke a lesson!

All of sudden, all hell broke loose! You'd think someone had loosed off a low-megaton nuke, for a good dose of canned sunshine. It was worse than daylight, I think the trees along the edge of the road caught fire!

This bloke in the 4WD coming towards him, must have had about 8 Cibies, plus about 4 Hella Rallyes, plus 150 watt globes in his headlights. You couldn't see anything, it was like looking directly at a nuclear blast!
We all laughed as the brother had to pull up, he couldn't see the road directly in front of him!

The bloke roared past, and I'm sure we could hear gloating laughter. It was funny in one respect - but it was also a pretty juvenile stunt, as well as dangerous - as blinding another driver could easily cause a major accident.
One thing's for sure, the brother learnt a lesson that night!

Cheers, Ron.
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Reply By: Mudguard - Monday, Jun 23, 2014 at 13:49

Monday, Jun 23, 2014 at 13:49
Hi axle
I do a lot of night runs, and getting close to 60 and was told that at our age we actually need more light to see, now you can go for HIDs, light bars & the like but when those lumens hit on a road sign you'll end up blinded also when you have to dip for on coming traffic say on a corner, You'll go from sunshine to candle in a blink, I run NARVA +120 (% not watts) globe upgrades c/w NARVA 175 100w spread/pencil. Blue vision globe upgrades only last 300hrs +$, and after a while night driving you still feel like you need more light, you're getting tired time to pull over.
cheers
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Follow Up By: Member - Ian H8 - Monday, Jun 23, 2014 at 21:16

Monday, Jun 23, 2014 at 21:16
Maybe we should try to convince our learned main roads engineers that if they would turn their drive in screen size signs on a slight angle away from the oncoming traffic it would be much safer to drive at night because if you are set up for driving on country roads the glare from the signs can blind an unsuspecting or inexperienced driver
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Reply By: Axle - Monday, Jun 23, 2014 at 16:27

Monday, Jun 23, 2014 at 16:27
Thanks fellas for all the info,...Will work my way through it and see what suits me best


Amazing how things can catch up with you so quickly.


Cheers Axle.
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Follow Up By: gbc - Tuesday, Jun 24, 2014 at 09:56

Tuesday, Jun 24, 2014 at 09:56
Grab some cheap yellow tinted safety glasses for a test in the first instance. The extra amount of light they filter in pretty much blinds you during the daytime. A definite must have for night time.
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Reply By: Member - Matt M - Tuesday, Jun 24, 2014 at 09:51

Tuesday, Jun 24, 2014 at 09:51
Can't help with the failing eye sight Axle, the joys of getting on in life I suppose. A couple of interesting issues raised here with night driving in general I though.

Happy to be corrected, but my understanding is that you can't retro fit HID inserts if your lights are not self levelling and don't have washers on them? These lights are great , but poorly adjusted or with a load on board and even on low beam they can be quite blinding. Fog lights? Night time does not automatically equate to reduced visibility, yet you see so many people who just have them on by default and they can be very distracting to oncoming vehicles. There is a reason they are switched separately. Not going to happen, but I would like to see a rule that requires them to be switched such that you have to turn them on each time you drive, if you want them on. We have done the poor old police to death on here recently, but I would like to see people pulled over occasionally and told to turn them off (even without a fine, just a reminder).

One of the downfalls of the HID style lights are that they do reflect badly from road signs. Perhaps there will be a new reflective material developed at some point to account for the proliferation of newer style lights, but one thing that amazes me is the sheer number of signs on the side of the road. Driving in built up areas you expect it and usually on low beam anyhow. Similarly once you get truly remote they are rarer, but in the rural areas around towns/cities, the number and variety are staggering. Most of the time (particularly on a familiar road) you simply don't notice them, but try actually counting them sometime. I know they are there to warn of everything from what weeds I should be spraying to how many wombats I can expect in the next 500 metres but there comes a point when you need to strike a balance between providing necessary information to drivers and actually allowing them to concentrate on the road itself and what is happening around it.

My favourite is, 'Don't tailgate. Kangaroos can randomly jump in front of vehicles'. Anyone who hasn't worked that out in Australia shouldn't have a licence in the first place.

Grumpy and going blind.

Matt.
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Follow Up By: Mudguard - Wednesday, Jun 25, 2014 at 09:31

Wednesday, Jun 25, 2014 at 09:31
Yep that's why I down graded my driving lights you need to have enough to see whats in front of you to stop safely at your touring speed not lighting up the next town.I need to see the roos at 50m not 900m
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Reply By: Echucan Bob - Tuesday, Jun 24, 2014 at 15:31

Tuesday, Jun 24, 2014 at 15:31
I have noticed at age 60 that red tail lights and red reflectors seem to distort like I'm looking through a kaleidoscope - ie there are four images of each object. It makes it hard to discern tail lights from red reflectors about a kilometer ahead. What has helped is wearing some weak reading glasses (+0.5 diopters).

The best thing to help my night driving has been to upgrade all my high beams and spots to HID. Instead of my rheumy old eyes peering through the dimly lit gloom cast by the oem halogens, its like driving on a sunny day.

The upshot of both the foregoing is that some people have experienced a retina smoking burst of radiation by glancing at their rear view mirror when I have mistaken their tail lights for road side reflectors.

Bob
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Reply By: discovery1652/4 - Tuesday, Jun 24, 2014 at 19:52

Tuesday, Jun 24, 2014 at 19:52
never had good eyes and always wear glasses.i have regular eyechecks with new glasses when required.12months ago coming home at night wet and rainy a busy narrow road and i was continually dazzled by head lights and all in all it t was a horror drive.i am 75 and the next day i made an appointment with specsavers for new glasses. i was told that i had bad cattaracts.after having themdone you have no idea how much my eyesight has improved,everything is so vivid and clear.i still avoid night driving when it is wet but normal night time driving is no problem. i had the replacement lens and no tthe laser treatment.so i wonder if some people are not aware of catarract causing there failing eyesight and not so much their age
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