Low Beam not working

Submitted: Tuesday, Jun 24, 2014 at 14:08
ThreadID: 108473 Views:3609 Replies:6 FollowUps:14
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Hi I have a 2006 Hilux SR5 and the low beam just stopped working on both sides.
High Beam ok, parkers ok.
Fuse or relay, or something else?
What do you think?

Thanks

Wato
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Reply By: Bob Y. - Qld - Tuesday, Jun 24, 2014 at 14:28

Tuesday, Jun 24, 2014 at 14:28
Wato,

We were in Brissy, on holidays, and about to head to friend's place, to go out for tea. For some reason I checked the lights, and both low beams were out. Raced up to auto sparkies and both low beams had blown.

They said el cheapo globes don't last. Otherwise can't help you at moment,

Bob

Seen it all, Done it all.
Can't remember most of it.

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Reply By: Roughasguts - Tuesday, Jun 24, 2014 at 14:30

Tuesday, Jun 24, 2014 at 14:30
Might be the dipping switch contact worn, or just needs a clean.
Contact cleaner worked on mine.

Cheers
AnswerID: 534923

Reply By: Ross M - Tuesday, Jun 24, 2014 at 15:56

Tuesday, Jun 24, 2014 at 15:56
The headlight relay should be OK if Highs are ON when selected.

Both High and Low beam have separate fuses, check the low beam fuse, if blown it will stop both lights. If blown, you may have to find the shorting fault before just plugging in a new fuse, each new fuse will vaporize quite quickly until the fault is found, if fault present.

Both globes can blow nearly at the same time especially if the voltage regulator in the alt is faulty and charging too high. If too high it will damage other electronic vitals. Lows are always ON and high beam isn't always glowing. Make sure the fully charged battery voltage is checked. 14.2v OK

Can be the combination switch on the RH stalk faulty.



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Reply By: Shaker - Tuesday, Jun 24, 2014 at 16:10

Tuesday, Jun 24, 2014 at 16:10
Always start with the basics, as suggested have checked the globes?

AnswerID: 534931

Follow Up By: wato35 - Tuesday, Jun 24, 2014 at 16:48

Tuesday, Jun 24, 2014 at 16:48
Problem fixed, both globes had blown.

Thanks to all for replying.

Wato
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Follow Up By: Shaker - Tuesday, Jun 24, 2014 at 17:32

Tuesday, Jun 24, 2014 at 17:32
Ha ha! I got caught like that when I was a kid, didn't consider the obvious, spent hours tracking wires, ran a temporary wire to test & found 2 blown globes!

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Follow Up By: HKB Electronics - Tuesday, Jun 24, 2014 at 21:13

Tuesday, Jun 24, 2014 at 21:13
As a matter of interest did you have power bulbs fitted, some of the equivalent higher wattage globes can have a very short life?

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Follow Up By: wato35 - Tuesday, Jun 24, 2014 at 21:16

Tuesday, Jun 24, 2014 at 21:16
Did notice the name on the globes, but I know the auto elec and told him I want ones that will last. 2 globes cost $33 + fitting.
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Reply By: olcoolone - Tuesday, Jun 24, 2014 at 17:13

Tuesday, Jun 24, 2014 at 17:13
I would either look at the globes as mentioned above or the combination switch..... it could even be a broken wire.

On the Hilux (current model) there is a fuse for the left hand light and a fuse for the right hand light..... left hand light fuse does high and low and right hand does high and low so if it was a fuse one side would be out on high and low.

There is no relays (love experts), to control the lights the switching signal comes from the combination switch as an earth signal.

The low beam signal comes out of the stalk as a single black with red trace wire and then divides in to two going to each light...... the high beam signal comes out of the stalk as a single red with yellow trace wire and then divides in to two to each light..... remember these are earth switched.

The positive signal to the light is by a red and a black wire that each goes through a 20 amp fuse direct from the battery before going to the headlight globe.
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Follow Up By: Ross M - Tuesday, Jun 24, 2014 at 18:52

Tuesday, Jun 24, 2014 at 18:52
If no relay, how do the lights become OFF when the stalk switch is operated.
Is it via HEAVY wires right up to the stalk headlight switch? the high /low being different to the headlight switch of course. That means all the current has to go to the stalk switch and then to the lights to be then returned to the stalk switch H/L contacts for earthing to negative???

Low beam and High beam signal doesn't come out of the stalk switch AFAIK because it actually goes into the stalk switch for connection to neg.

Strange there is no relay for the basic heavy switching.
Can you post a circuit diagram of how it is done?

Definitely a deviation from all previous Toyota headlight wiring if that way.
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Follow Up By: olcoolone - Tuesday, Jun 24, 2014 at 20:14

Tuesday, Jun 24, 2014 at 20:14
The current shape Hilux doesn't have headlight relays for some strange reason unlike most of the other Toyota's.

The combi switch is earth and there is constant battery voltage to the globes via fuses.

We have never seen an issue with them unlike other that don't use relays.
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Follow Up By: Member - Stuart P (WA) - Wednesday, Jun 25, 2014 at 07:39

Wednesday, Jun 25, 2014 at 07:39
certainly does, like the 100 series they are embedded into the main fuse box
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Follow Up By: olcoolone - Wednesday, Jun 25, 2014 at 08:50

Wednesday, Jun 25, 2014 at 08:50
"certainly does, like the 100 series they are embedded into the main fuse box"

Where are they?

What is the relay number?

Have you seen them or is it "I think they have"

Maybe the one I owned for 5 years and all the others I have worked on for some strange reason didn't have them.....LOL

Can you show me on the wiring diagram where they are?
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Follow Up By: olcoolone - Wednesday, Jun 25, 2014 at 08:57

Wednesday, Jun 25, 2014 at 08:57
Just dragged up the wiring diagram.... funny no mention on there either..... they must of forgot it....
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Follow Up By: olcoolone - Wednesday, Jun 25, 2014 at 09:38

Wednesday, Jun 25, 2014 at 09:38
Ross here is a link to the Hilux wiring diagram, page 84 is the headlights.

http://vib.prospectiuni.ro/DOC/auto/06_Hilux_Manual_Complete/vigo%20ebook/EWD%20(HILUX_Thailand).pdf
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Follow Up By: Polaris - Wednesday, Jun 25, 2014 at 15:26

Wednesday, Jun 25, 2014 at 15:26
No relay on the original wiring on my KZN130 Surf either. Voltage at the headlight with the light running (and engine running) was a pathetic 10.7 V ! Fitted a relay and the improvement was amazing.
Fitting the relay was a bit of a challenge though - with Toyotas negative switching !
Easiest way to establish if there is a relay and where it is - lift the bonnet and have someone flick from high to low - you will hear the relay clicking if there is one.
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Reply By: Zippo - Tuesday, Jun 24, 2014 at 19:39

Tuesday, Jun 24, 2014 at 19:39
Having seen the other posts and your result (two blown globes) causes me to ask: Have you got one of those "alternator voltage booster diodes" fitted? They will certainly increase the stress on all lamps, especially higher wattage ones.
AnswerID: 534943

Follow Up By: HKB Electronics - Tuesday, Jun 24, 2014 at 22:01

Tuesday, Jun 24, 2014 at 22:01
Sorry but really that doesn't make sense, a normal alternator will put out around 14.4V@24C. A boosted alternator puts out around 14.2V to 14.4V@24C more or less the same as a standard alternator, mind you any temperature compensated alternator can run anywhere between 13.2V to 15V or higher depending on the ambient temperature conditions.

A typical headlight bulb has to deal with these fluctuations but the European standard for headlight globes from memory is an operating voltage around 13.2V

In a typical car setup the headlight wiring will drop around 1V to 1.5V or more hence the thriving market in after market headlight wiring forms.

So in reality the bulb will generally be running at around 13.2V or less, ie it's design voltage.

With regards to higher wattage ones, I assume you mean higher equivalent wattage types, their is a reason standard bulbs produce less output, it is called lifespan! Higher equivalent output bulbs run hotter, hotter equates to shorter life spans. That is why they are rated at 25%, 50% & 75% more equivalent power. You will also note one or two manufactures now offer longer life lower power versions.

Simply fact is if you want maximum life then use standard globes.

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Follow Up By: Zippo - Tuesday, Jun 24, 2014 at 22:15

Tuesday, Jun 24, 2014 at 22:15
A booster diode on a 2006 alternator will be higher than the standard 14.4-ish figure. That's what I was getting at. No, not a clever combination but that doesn't rule it out.

Higher wattage lamps i.e. headlights which are generally run with hotter filaments (rather than say instrument lights) and are more prone to premature filament failure. Even you should be aware of that.
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Follow Up By: HKB Electronics - Tuesday, Jun 24, 2014 at 23:09

Tuesday, Jun 24, 2014 at 23:09
The booster diode is not intended for use on a standard alternator under normal conditions though some users do run them for varying reasons.

It is mainly designed for use on high compensation, low voltage output types to restore the output voltage to normal levels as you would have found out if you bothered to do some research!

And just for your information there are 2006 and earlier models running high compensation type alternators.

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