Stretchy rubber cord for rooftop tent

Submitted: Tuesday, Jul 08, 2014 at 09:48
ThreadID: 108644 Views:1963 Replies:6 FollowUps:11
This Thread has been Archived
Anyone know where on line I can source some of the stretchy fabric covered rubber cord that clips between the walls of our ARB roof top tent? Have several that are now broken and a trip coming up very shortly.
Back Expand Un-Read 0 Moderator

Reply By: AlbyNSW - Tuesday, Jul 08, 2014 at 10:06

Tuesday, Jul 08, 2014 at 10:06
Boating chandlery like Whitworths (have an online store as well) or even BCF have it. Cant remember if I have seen it at Bunnings but worth a shot.

You could also check with motor/ boat trimmers as they use it on ute tarps and boat covers
AnswerID: 535649

Reply By: Member - Frank P (NSW) - Tuesday, Jul 08, 2014 at 10:14

Tuesday, Jul 08, 2014 at 10:14
Simza,

It's called bungy cord, pronounced bunjee, so you know what to ask for.

Bunnings have it in different sizes, sold by the metre.
FrankP

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message
Moderator

AnswerID: 535650

Follow Up By: Member - Simza - Tuesday, Jul 08, 2014 at 10:24

Tuesday, Jul 08, 2014 at 10:24
Just called ARB as well and apparently a set of 4 is $1.77 including clips!! Amazing. About to go to agent and double check pricing and if right thats the way to go.
0
FollowupID: 819549

Reply By: Bludge - Tuesday, Jul 08, 2014 at 14:47

Tuesday, Jul 08, 2014 at 14:47
The correct term for the elastic stuff is Shock Cord :)
TonyV

Cairns FNQ.

Member
My Profile  My Position  Send Message

AnswerID: 535676

Follow Up By: Member - Frank P (NSW) - Tuesday, Jul 08, 2014 at 15:49

Tuesday, Jul 08, 2014 at 15:49
I guess if you put an end on it it becomes a bungy cord :-)

And the last lot I bought from Bunnings would have been sheathed rubber rope? Single solid core wrapped in fabric.

:-)
FrankP

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message
Moderator

1
FollowupID: 819572

Follow Up By: Bludge - Tuesday, Jul 08, 2014 at 17:37

Follow Up By: The Bantam - Tuesday, Jul 08, 2014 at 18:25

Tuesday, Jul 08, 2014 at 18:25
If buying it off the roll..the vast majority of the time it will be sold as shock cord.

Most boating chandleries will have it is several sizes...and all sorts of fittings to go with.

cheers
1
FollowupID: 819593

Follow Up By: gbc - Wednesday, Jul 09, 2014 at 06:22

Wednesday, Jul 09, 2014 at 06:22
If you get about 10 metres and a couple of tonneau buttons you can also whip up a very handy washing line/clothes airer/storer system on the underside of the bed part that folds out. Good for drying towels overnight and storing day clothes while sleeping. There are a million uses for the stuff.
1
FollowupID: 819628

Follow Up By: Nomadic Navara - Wednesday, Jul 09, 2014 at 13:47

Wednesday, Jul 09, 2014 at 13:47
Quote "Only ever referred to them as Occy straps or shock cord, those names have been around a lot longer than bungy's ;)"

I reckon that the statement indicates you are one of the dribblies and not one of the wrinklies.
PeterD
Retired radio and electronics technician

Lifetime Member
My Profile  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 819645

Reply By: Nomadic Navara - Wednesday, Jul 09, 2014 at 13:43

Wednesday, Jul 09, 2014 at 13:43
Let's clear up nomenclature AND spelling - bungee. Start off looking at this site. The earliest I remember it was after the war, they were used mainly in light aircraft suspension. Even the DC3 has some to initiate the wheel extension. It was also used in anti shock applications leading the the alternate name of shock cord.

Around the end of the 60s there was a device called an octopus strap introduced. It consisted of a small steel ring with 8 bungee cords attached. Each cord was terminated with a hook of the same type as were used on the bungee straps. The device was sold as a means of securing a load in a box trailer. These were supplanted by cargo nets also constructed from bungee cord. Around the time of the decline of octopus strap sales the uneducated great unwashed transferred he name octopus strap to bungee straps. this was later shortened to occy strap. I detest this term as it is inaccurate and does not refer to the original item that bore the name.


PeterD
Retired radio and electronics technician

Lifetime Member
My Profile  Send Message

AnswerID: 535734

Follow Up By: Zippo - Wednesday, Jul 09, 2014 at 18:28

Wednesday, Jul 09, 2014 at 18:28
http://www.clarkrubber.com.au/shock-cord.html - the 6mm is around $2/metre.
1
FollowupID: 819663

Reply By: Member - Frank P (NSW) - Wednesday, Jul 09, 2014 at 13:57

Wednesday, Jul 09, 2014 at 13:57
Bludge,

What have we done???

:-)
FrankP

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message
Moderator

AnswerID: 535736

Follow Up By: Bludge - Wednesday, Jul 09, 2014 at 17:30

Wednesday, Jul 09, 2014 at 17:30
Frank P,

According to Wikipedia, "Occy strap / Octopus strap in Australian common usage", so it should be used, unfortunately Peter D does not like this. If I were living in America I would agree and leave it.

So you know Frank, Peter and I have locked horns before, so this response does not surprise me.

We are in Australia and we should not change words that have become part of our vocabulary and in "common use", to use overseas terminology, Shopping trolley becomes a Cart, shopping centres are now Malls, zee instead of zed, diaper instead of nappy, stroller not pushchair even down to "have an nice day", lets keep our Australian language and the culture that made it what it is....

Now because we are in Australia and have many words that mean something to Australians but can be strange to others I thought I had better look at Wiktionary the Australian version

I note that Occy is present but not the word Bungee.

So suggesting that Occy strap should be called a Bungee, should we also change, Thongs or Jandles if you are from New Zealand, to Flip Flops, Jug to Kettle, insist that a root is something a tree grows on plants.

After all, "at the end of the day", if we "do the math" and use the "least worst option", we could "leverage" the "normalcy" and "gotten" our own words for things, shouldn't we use them?

I note that the Australian word "whinge" is now common usage in the UK.

Please note that all this is meant to be in good humour.
TonyV

Cairns FNQ.

Member
My Profile  My Position  Send Message

1
FollowupID: 819659

Follow Up By: Member - Frank P (NSW) - Wednesday, Jul 09, 2014 at 17:58

Wednesday, Jul 09, 2014 at 17:58
Thanks mate. I think I'll let you have the last word and leave it at that. We're way off-topic and had our bit of fun :-)
Safe travels and

Cheers

FrankP

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message
Moderator

1
FollowupID: 819660

Follow Up By: Nomadic Navara - Wednesday, Jul 09, 2014 at 18:11

Wednesday, Jul 09, 2014 at 18:11
Quote - "Now because we are in Australia and have many words that mean something to Australians but can be strange to others I thought I had better look at Wiktionary the Australian version

"I note that Occy is present but not the word Bungee."

So what are you telling us? I had a look at your link and it lead me to "Appendix:Australian English vocabulary." A quick look at this shows that the list is just a list of colloquial terms. Colloquial terms are language that the low life feed off. If you enter the realm of the commercial world you should use the correct technical terms if you wish to receive the correct terms. The OP was after the correct terms to source to secure the items he wants.
PeterD
Retired radio and electronics technician

Lifetime Member
My Profile  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 819661

Follow Up By: Bludge - Wednesday, Jul 09, 2014 at 19:05

Wednesday, Jul 09, 2014 at 19:05
Thanks Frank ;-)
TonyV

Cairns FNQ.

Member
My Profile  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 819665

Reply By: mikehzz - Wednesday, Jul 09, 2014 at 17:37

Wednesday, Jul 09, 2014 at 17:37
I can't figure out if I want to be (or am), a dribbly or a wrinkly...
AnswerID: 535743

Sponsored Links

Popular Products (13)