LPG storage

Submitted: Tuesday, Sep 02, 2014 at 14:51
ThreadID: 109371 Views:1957 Replies:5 FollowUps:14
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I have always stored my LPG cylinders in the garage but is this safe or should I be leaving them outside especially in the event that there is a leakage ?
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Reply By: Freshstart - Tuesday, Sep 02, 2014 at 16:21

Tuesday, Sep 02, 2014 at 16:21
Ours are on the back verandah, out of the garage etc and hidden from view. I wouldn't store them in any room unless it has been made for that specific purpose. Nor inside a car.

Good idea to get them out of the garage.
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Reply By: Member - sdr00y (Beecroft,NSW) - Tuesday, Sep 02, 2014 at 16:38

Tuesday, Sep 02, 2014 at 16:38
It may depend upon your garage as to where you store it. If there is a leak LPG is heavier than air so will pool in low areas. Most garages are fairly level but the gas may flow out and away safely. Other garages, say in a basement of a block of units, may find drains or may just sit and pool in the whole basement.

Storing the cylinder outside in the weather brings with it other issues such as rust which will cause a leak. A dry well protected garage would normally be the best place to store a cylinder, away from little people who may turn on the cylinder, should be good.

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Follow Up By: Lee B1 - Tuesday, Sep 02, 2014 at 16:55

Tuesday, Sep 02, 2014 at 16:55
I won't store petrol or LPG in an enclosed Garage. In the case of a fire your insurance company may try to use this as a way to avoid liability.
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Follow Up By: Member - sdr00y (Beecroft,NSW) - Friday, Sep 05, 2014 at 22:46

Friday, Sep 05, 2014 at 22:46
Lee B1, an lpg cylinder and proper container of petrol are no more a cause of a fire in a garage than the fuel tank in a car, mower, or small tins of fuel for mower, whipper snipper, chainsaw etc. The garage would be the expected place to store these items in a domestic situation and insurance companies know that.

If these containers were such a problem insurance companies would state such on your policy.

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Reply By: Member -Pinko (NSW) - Tuesday, Sep 02, 2014 at 17:27

Tuesday, Sep 02, 2014 at 17:27
I once was involved in rescuing two guys from a cellar beneath a large garage.
They were sticking cork flooring to the concrete with a volatile adhesive.
Both were unconscious and could be seen from the top of the stairwell.
Since this was a rural area backup was long time off.
A decision was made to take some deep breaths and two of us would sculldrag them outside one at a time.
In the forty or so minutes it took for backup to arrive the two tradies were just coming around with oxygen therapy.
The Risk:
The fireies stated if the light switch happened to be activated the tiny spark would have ignited the volatile atmoshphere and all four of us would have gone to heaven .
Not worth the risk John.
Go to Bunnings and buy a couple of large plastic garbage bins then hole saw a hole in the bottom and stand them on a couple of house bricks outside somewhere
Living is a journey,it depends on where you go !
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Follow Up By: Member - bbuzz (NSW) - Tuesday, Sep 02, 2014 at 17:57

Tuesday, Sep 02, 2014 at 17:57
How good are the plastic screw in bungs that Qld have made compulsory for LPG containers not hooked up to an appliance?

I make sure that bottle is turned off tightly and has a bung in it.

bill
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Follow Up By: John S17 - Tuesday, Sep 02, 2014 at 18:12

Tuesday, Sep 02, 2014 at 18:12
Can you tell me more about the bungs bbuzz? What exactly are they and where can I get them .
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Follow Up By: Shaker - Tuesday, Sep 02, 2014 at 18:15

Tuesday, Sep 02, 2014 at 18:15
Bunnings have them.


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Follow Up By: disco driver - Tuesday, Sep 02, 2014 at 18:29

Tuesday, Sep 02, 2014 at 18:29
My understanding is that those bungs are NOT designed to seal the outlet, they are just to keep the dirt, spiders etc out when the cylinder is not connected to the system.

Disco.
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Follow Up By: Member - bbuzz (NSW) - Tuesday, Sep 02, 2014 at 20:39

Tuesday, Sep 02, 2014 at 20:39
BCF have them too.
I got mine for free in Qld as I turned up for a refill without them. Was a while ago so maybe it was an introductory offer!

I am sure you could find an O-ring or similar to make a seal.

bill
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Follow Up By: Shaker - Tuesday, Sep 02, 2014 at 21:44

Tuesday, Sep 02, 2014 at 21:44
You can also buy brass ones that do seal!

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Follow Up By: Les PK Ranger - Wednesday, Sep 03, 2014 at 07:46

Wednesday, Sep 03, 2014 at 07:46
Thread tape should do the trick on both plastic or brass bungs.
Always store and transport lpg cylinders upright so the relief valve will operate should the get too hot / build up pressure..
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Reply By: Bludge - Tuesday, Sep 02, 2014 at 18:46

Tuesday, Sep 02, 2014 at 18:46
John,

I think you got the answer above, the NSW Fire rules (click here)

The Queensland rule are here (click here)

So outside and out of the sun is the way, if not in use, turn off and put a plug in it (QLD rule) keep away from other fuels.
TonyV

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Follow Up By: John and Regina M - Tuesday, Sep 02, 2014 at 19:14

Tuesday, Sep 02, 2014 at 19:14
Then ring yr insurance company and see what they say about the storage of lpg not attached to an appliance.

Most will not cover you if they are implicated in the fire.
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Follow Up By: Shaker - Wednesday, Sep 03, 2014 at 08:21

Wednesday, Sep 03, 2014 at 08:21
So the insurance companies think the rubber connection hose won't burn on a fire? If the bottle is not connected it will definitely be turned OFF. I have never read so much garbage about gas storage, what about workshops that have oxy acetylene welding sets???
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Follow Up By: MUZBRY- Life member(Vic) - Wednesday, Sep 03, 2014 at 08:53

Wednesday, Sep 03, 2014 at 08:53
Gday Shaker
Arn't oxy and ascet bottles supposed to be stored outside in a locked cage ?
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Follow Up By: Bludge - Wednesday, Sep 03, 2014 at 09:13

Wednesday, Sep 03, 2014 at 09:13
John and Regina,

" Most will not cover you if they are implicated in the fire."

You should include all petroleum products, petrol, 2-stroke, kerosene, some paints, white spirit, turps or any flammable product that may be in the shed or garage.

Maybe even the house :)




There will be millions of LPG gas cylinders in Australia.
Many attached to houses where town (piped) gas is not available, some very close to cities as well as in the suburbs, rural areas, just about every service station does LPG refills, so has stand alone tanks, as well as LPG for vehicles, most Camping stores have LPG refill stations, domestic BBQ's, caravans, campervans and camper trailers, boats and the list goes on.
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Follow Up By: Shaker - Wednesday, Sep 03, 2014 at 17:10

Wednesday, Sep 03, 2014 at 17:10
Acetylene bottles have to be transported in locked cage in the open back of a vehicle (utility), but there is no requirement to store them outside in a workshop or panel shop environment.

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Reply By: BunderDog - Thursday, Sep 04, 2014 at 15:07

Thursday, Sep 04, 2014 at 15:07
Really can't see why Australia can't use the International Standard LPG Cylinders with the safety valve. Until an appliance is screwed to the cylinder NO GAS will come out even if the valve is full on. Even has a safety float internally which will cut off the gas flow if tipped over.
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